This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

ablutions

ablutions Sentence Examples

  • In such moments of baffled inquiry he would leave his books, perform the requisite ablutions, then hie to the mosque, and continue in prayer till light broke on his difficulties.

  • The Holy Spirit, we are told, rested on him, drawn to him by the usual means of the mysticsself-flogging, ablutions and penance.

  • It was paved with large flagstones and in the centre was a beautiful kiosk or pavilion, covered with gold and raised over the reservoir of water for ablutions.

  • Mahommedan religion, consisting generally of a large open court (sahn) surrounded by arcades (liwan), with a fountain (mida-a) in the centre of the court, for the ablutions necessary before prayer.

  • To these ecclesiastical precepts and expiations belong in particular the numerous ablutions, bodily chastisements, love of truth, beneficial works, support of comrades in the faith, alms, chastity, improvement of the land, arboriculture, breeding of cattle, agriculture, protection of useful animals, as the dog, the destruction of noxious animals, and the prohibition either to burn or to bury the dead.

  • Simon to his numerous assembly of disciples on the form of the Deity and on pneumatology; (10) " The Young Man," discourses by young men of superhuman origin on the mysteries of ablutions; and (I I) " The Small Assembly," containing the discourses on the Sephiroth which R.

  • 14), and every precaution was taken on religious occasions to ensure purity by special ablutions and by cleansing the clothes.

  • His bristly black person, and shagged breast quite open and rarely purified by any ablutions, was wrapped in a foul linen nightgown and his bushy hair dishevelled.

  • Water stands in this Gospel for what is still but symbol; thus the water-pots serve here the external Jewish ablutions - old bottles which the " new wine " of the Gospel is to burst (Mark ii.

  • The purport, then, of ablutions is to remove, not dust and dirt, but the - to us imaginary - stains contracted by contact with the dead, with childbirth, with menstruous women, with murder whether wilful or involuntary, with almost any form of bloodshed, with persons of inferior caste, with dead animal refuse, e.g.

  • In general, water, cows' urine and blood of swine are the materials used in ablutions.

  • Some concrete examples will best illustrate the nature of such ablutions.

  • The same care is shown in ritual ablutions in the Bukovina and elsewhere.

  • Ablutions both of persons and things are usually cathartic, that is, intended to purge away evil influences (KaOaipa y, to make KaOapos, pure).

  • The rites, met within all lands, of pouring out water or bathing in order to produce rain from heaven, differ in their significance from ablutions with water and belong to the realm of sympathetic magic.

  • There are certain forms of purification which one does not know whether to describe as ablutions or anointings.

  • The Manichaean had to pray four times a day, each prayer being preceded by ablutions.

  • A court enclosed the whole; near the porch was a laver for the ablutions of intending worshippers.

  • Maundy Thursday is sometimes known as Sheer or Chare Thursday, either in allusion, it is thought, to the "shearing" of heads and beards in preparation for Easter, or more probably in the word's Middle English sense of "pure," in allusion to the ablutions of the day.

  • In the centre of the court is a fountain for ablutions, often surmounted by a dome, and in the prayerchamber a pulpit and a desk for readers.

  • The Berbers, though Mahommedans, do not often observe the prescribed ablutions; they break their fast at Ramadan; and eat wild boar's flesh and drink fig brandy.

  • Chief among these vessels is the iota, or globular bowl, universally used in ceremonial ablutions.

  • They rise early, and after having performed their prayers and ablutions dress themselves in a new suit of clothes, and sally forth to the "fire-temples," to worship the emblem of their divinity, the sacred fire, which is perpetually burning on the altar.

  • Curiously enough, the name "Sabian" was used by theMeccanidolaters to denote Mahomet himself andhisMoslem converts, apparently on account of the frequent ceremonial ablutions which formed a striking feature of the new religion.

  • From all this we conclude that what is poetry to us - akin to the folk-lore of water-sprites, naiads, kelpies, river-gods and water-worship in general - was to Tertullian and to the generations of believers who fashioned the baptismal rites, ablutions and beliefs of the church, nothing less than grim reality and unquestionable fact.

  • It was a Jewish rule that in ablutions the water should run over and away from the parts of the body washed.

  • (2) Contact with the dead entailed a pollution which lasted at least a day and must be washed away by ablutions, before a man is re-admitted to religious cult.

  • To this latter indulgence is to be attributed the apparent indifferentism which leads to their joining Moslems in prayers and ablutions, or sprinkling themselves with holy water in Maronite churches.

  • In ecclesiastical usage the term was given to a shallow stone basin (the French cuvette) placed near the altar in a church, with drains to take away the water used in the ablutions at the mass.

  • Rosalie McLain [18 Jun ]: Do Inca Gods have ablutions?

  • It depicts the Hindu Raja of Jammu performing ritual ablutions prior to worship.

  • He moved toward the bathroom to begin his morning ablutions.

  • In such moments of baffled inquiry he would leave his books, perform the requisite ablutions, then hie to the mosque, and continue in prayer till light broke on his difficulties.

  • The Holy Spirit, we are told, rested on him, drawn to him by the usual means of the mysticsself-flogging, ablutions and penance.

  • It was paved with large flagstones and in the centre was a beautiful kiosk or pavilion, covered with gold and raised over the reservoir of water for ablutions.

  • Mahommedan religion, consisting generally of a large open court (sahn) surrounded by arcades (liwan), with a fountain (mida-a) in the centre of the court, for the ablutions necessary before prayer.

  • To these ecclesiastical precepts and expiations belong in particular the numerous ablutions, bodily chastisements, love of truth, beneficial works, support of comrades in the faith, alms, chastity, improvement of the land, arboriculture, breeding of cattle, agriculture, protection of useful animals, as the dog, the destruction of noxious animals, and the prohibition either to burn or to bury the dead.

  • Simon to his numerous assembly of disciples on the form of the Deity and on pneumatology; (10) " The Young Man," discourses by young men of superhuman origin on the mysteries of ablutions; and (I I) " The Small Assembly," containing the discourses on the Sephiroth which R.

  • 14), and every precaution was taken on religious occasions to ensure purity by special ablutions and by cleansing the clothes.

  • In this way he takes in succession the typical Jewish institutions - Circumcision, Foods, Ablutions, Covenant, Sabbath, Temple - showing their spiritual counterpart in the New People and its ordinances, and that the Cross was prefigured from the first.

  • His bristly black person, and shagged breast quite open and rarely purified by any ablutions, was wrapped in a foul linen nightgown and his bushy hair dishevelled.

  • Water stands in this Gospel for what is still but symbol; thus the water-pots serve here the external Jewish ablutions - old bottles which the " new wine " of the Gospel is to burst (Mark ii.

  • The purport, then, of ablutions is to remove, not dust and dirt, but the - to us imaginary - stains contracted by contact with the dead, with childbirth, with menstruous women, with murder whether wilful or involuntary, with almost any form of bloodshed, with persons of inferior caste, with dead animal refuse, e.g.

  • In general, water, cows' urine and blood of swine are the materials used in ablutions.

  • Some concrete examples will best illustrate the nature of such ablutions.

  • The same care is shown in ritual ablutions in the Bukovina and elsewhere.

  • Ablutions both of persons and things are usually cathartic, that is, intended to purge away evil influences (KaOaipa y, to make KaOapos, pure).

  • The rites, met within all lands, of pouring out water or bathing in order to produce rain from heaven, differ in their significance from ablutions with water and belong to the realm of sympathetic magic.

  • There are certain forms of purification which one does not know whether to describe as ablutions or anointings.

  • The Manichaean had to pray four times a day, each prayer being preceded by ablutions.

  • A court enclosed the whole; near the porch was a laver for the ablutions of intending worshippers.

  • Maundy Thursday is sometimes known as Sheer or Chare Thursday, either in allusion, it is thought, to the "shearing" of heads and beards in preparation for Easter, or more probably in the word's Middle English sense of "pure," in allusion to the ablutions of the day.

  • In the centre of the court is a fountain for ablutions, often surmounted by a dome, and in the prayerchamber a pulpit and a desk for readers.

  • The daily ceremony closed with ablutions, anointings and a bountiful feast of bread, geese, beer and oxen; having taken his fill of these, the god returned to his shrine until the next morning, when the ritual was renewed.

  • The Berbers, though Mahommedans, do not often observe the prescribed ablutions; they break their fast at Ramadan; and eat wild boar's flesh and drink fig brandy.

  • Chief among these vessels is the iota, or globular bowl, universally used in ceremonial ablutions.

  • They rise early, and after having performed their prayers and ablutions dress themselves in a new suit of clothes, and sally forth to the "fire-temples," to worship the emblem of their divinity, the sacred fire, which is perpetually burning on the altar.

  • Curiously enough, the name "Sabian" was used by theMeccanidolaters to denote Mahomet himself andhisMoslem converts, apparently on account of the frequent ceremonial ablutions which formed a striking feature of the new religion.

  • From all this we conclude that what is poetry to us - akin to the folk-lore of water-sprites, naiads, kelpies, river-gods and water-worship in general - was to Tertullian and to the generations of believers who fashioned the baptismal rites, ablutions and beliefs of the church, nothing less than grim reality and unquestionable fact.

  • It was a Jewish rule that in ablutions the water should run over and away from the parts of the body washed.

  • (2) Contact with the dead entailed a pollution which lasted at least a day and must be washed away by ablutions, before a man is re-admitted to religious cult.

  • To this latter indulgence is to be attributed the apparent indifferentism which leads to their joining Moslems in prayers and ablutions, or sprinkling themselves with holy water in Maronite churches.

  • In ecclesiastical usage the term was given to a shallow stone basin (the French cuvette) placed near the altar in a church, with drains to take away the water used in the ablutions at the mass.

Browse other sentences examples →