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abiding

abiding

abiding Sentence Examples

  • "He's only abiding by the judge's direction," Cynthia answered.

  • And yet, notwithstanding all this, and partly because of all this, real and distinct Norman influence has been far more extensive and far more abiding in England than it has been in Sicily.

  • The abiding tradition of the Cretan aborigines, as preserved by Herodotus (vii.

  • The impression made by him in parliament is in some danger of being forgotten, because he was not instrumental in carrying any great measure that might serve as an abiding memorial.

  • As an exegete and biblical critic no less than as a grammarian he has left his abiding mark.

  • The most important fact in his history is his confession, recorded by Orosius, that he saw the inability of his countrymen to rear a civilized or abiding kingdom, and that consequently his aim should be to build on Roman foundations and blend the two nations into one.

  • Henry was too young to have carried away any abiding impressions, yet throughout his life his character, dress and bearing were far more Spanish than French.

  • The following are the more important works - some of them were rewritten and in a measure recast, and the date given is not necessarily that of the first appearance of the book, but of its more complete and abiding form:.

  • The abiding interest in Korner is patriotic and political rather than literary.

  • In that manner his influence, as represented by the text of many a statute regulating the relations between Austria and Hungary, is one of an abiding character.

  • It may be said generally that Catharism formed the abiding background of medieval heresy.

  • But Anabaptism was not to remain an abiding force on the continent; and though colonies of its exiles settled in England, they did not produce the Congregationalism which sprang up there under Elizabeth.

  • It will then apply the tests thus gained to the narratives special to this Gospel; and point out the book's special difficulties and limits, and its abiding appeal and greatness.

  • 26, 27); the sign which follows is but the pictorial representation of this abiding truth.

  • Scott's The Fourth Gospel (1906) gives a lucid, critical and religiously tempered account of the Gospel's ideas, aims, affinities, difficulties and abiding significance.

  • arbitrari, to examine or judge), a term derived from the nomenclature of Roman law, and applied to an arrangement for taking, and abiding by, the judgment of a selected person in some disputed matter, instead of carrying it to the established courts of justice.

  • Her whole life, public and private, was an abiding lesson in the paramount importance of character.

  • He regarded the abiding life of Rome as "the central truth of European history," the bond of its unity, and he undertook his History of Sicily (1891-1894) partly because it illustrated this unity.

  • In this idea Paul also shared, but he carried the matter farther than most of his contemporaries and saw in the Spirit the abiding power and ground of the Christian life.

  • The opening pages of his commentaries on the Iliad and the Odyssey dwell with enthusiasm on the abiding influence of Homer on the literature of Greece.

  • There is also a spiritual chewing of the body of Christ, not such that by it we understand the very food to be changed into spirit, but such that, the body and blood of the Lord abiding in their essence and peculiarity, they are spiritually communicated to us, not in any corporeal way, but in a spiritual, through the Holy Spirit which applies and bestows on us those things which were prepared through the flesh and blood of the Lord betrayed for our sake to death, to wit, remission of sins, liberation and life eternal, so that Christ lives in us and we in him...

  • But These Very Digressions' Give The Book Its Intimate And Abiding Charm; For They Keep The Reader In Close Personal Touch With Every Side Of Canadian Life, With Songs And Tales And Homely Forms Of Speech, With The Best Features Of Seigniorial Times And The Strong Guidance Of An Ardent Church, With Voyageurs, Coureurs De Bois, Indians,., Soldiers, Sailors And All The Strenuous Adventurers Of A Wild, New, Giant World.

  • But the abiding value of his work lies in his preservation of facts in Roman history, religion, antiquities and language, which but for him might have perished.

  • an abiding title to fame.

  • Essential modifications could not, of course, be at once effected or even indicated in a power whose life-blood is tradition, and whose main strength has always lain in calmly abiding the issue of events and in temporizing.

  • His mind was cultivated; he was a discriminating patron of literature, and Westminster Abbey is an abiding memorial of his artistic taste.

  • Owing to his pure biblical style he had an abiding influence on subsequent liturgical writers.

  • On the other hand, at Messina there were few or none, and we hear of both Saracen and Greek villeins, the latter doubtless abiding as they were in Saracen times.

  • The rest of Palermo was soon granted; the Semitic capital became the abiding head of Sicily.

  • The attack on the empire had, however, no abiding results.

  • As a historian, indeed, he left no abiding work; the multiplicity of his interests prevented him from concentrating on any one subject.

  • In Leipzig Goethe also had time for what remained one of the abiding interests of his life, for art; he regarded A.

  • She is not mentioned in Homer, although the hearth is recognized as a place of refuge for suppliants; this seems to show that her worship was not universally acknowledged at the time of the Homeric poems. In post-Homeric religion she is one of the twelve Olympian deities, but, as the abiding goddess of the household, she never leaves Olympus.

  • These poorer people - who were not, however, "poor whites" - developed an abiding hostility towards the oligarchy.

  • The journey to Italy made by the king in 1154 was the precursor of five other expeditions which engaged his main energies for thirty years, during which the subjugation of the peninsula was the central and abiding aim of his policy.

  • In the numberless transitions that, whilst connecting, separate the spell and the prayer we observe as the accompaniment of every mood from extreme imperiousness to extreme humility an abiding will and desire to help the action out.

  • For with the same thou hast anointed priests, kings, and prophets and martyrs with this thy chrism, perfected by thee, 0 Lord, blessed, abiding within our bowels in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ."

  • The abiding result of his tutorship is a code of carefully graduated moral lessons - the Fables, the Dialogues of the Dead (a series of imaginary conversations between departed heroes), and finally Telemaque, where the adventures of the son of Ulysses in search of a father are made into a political novel with a purpose.

  • It is under the abiding influence of the Holy Ghost, and therefore cannot err in matters of faith.

  • History is thus represented by Hegel, for example, as the realization of the idea of freedom, or rather as the reconciliation of individual freedom and the play of cultured interests with the stable objectivity of law and an abiding consciousness of the greater whole in which we move.

  • The absence of water and of large trees is one of the most abiding impressions of the traveller.

  • The assurance of its own unique value that such wisdom involved they held to be an abiding possession for those who had attained it; 3 and without this assurance no act could be truly wise or virtuous.

  • The bliss to which the soul attains, by the extinction of desire, in the supreme home, is not absorption in the Lord, but union with Him in abiding individuality.

  • "He's only abiding by the judge's direction," Cynthia answered.

  • abide, being a law abiding citizen you get robbed £ 60 just for going slightly over the speed limit.

  • abide permanently penalize the vast majority of law abiding motorists for the sake of a few speed merchants?

  • abideh moment reveals the next with veiled clarity, refusing entry to the future, always abiding in the present.

  • abideempty towering stone church, swept clear of all ornament, pure and empty, with nothing abiding there.

  • And he who does not speak of God may abide in Him if he is abiding in love.

  • Quite simply they were not abiding by Googles guidelines for SEO.

  • abiding cultural fascination with Hitler.

  • abiding memory of the time?

  • abiding affection for the city.

  • abiding passion than clothes - music.

  • abiding impression was of his flexibility of thought.

  • That includes abiding by the highest standards of human rights set by the European Convention of Human Rights.

  • He possessed a deep knowledge of France and her history, an abiding affection for the Commonwealth and especially the USA.

  • basilisk's eyes are not reptilian but human, their expression an ancient and abiding love.

  • The Tories ' abiding belief that taxes are wrong springs from a moral certainty that the state itself does moral harm.

  • Common graces and moral virtues, these are of no long continuance; the soul must have an abiding work, an immortal work.

  • One of my abiding childhood memories is sitting in front of the television with a plate of orange iced cupcakes, watching Scooby-Doo.

  • This abiding fascination gives us a unique platform from which to contribute to commercial architecture.

  • loony just like to pop on and say hello to any fellow loonies, lefties or law abiding liberals.

  • Why permanently penalize the vast majority of law abiding motorists for the sake of a few speed merchants?

  • Here we meet the essential Richard Dawkins: inspirational in both his unswerving attention to rationalism and his abiding passions.

  • The basilisk's eyes are not reptilian but human, their expression an ancient and abiding love.

  • Indeed, the cornerstone of State sovereignty provides an abiding subtext to assertions of rights of transit.

  • It is a measure of the abiding affection for this apparently throwaway pop group that they are still well remembered nine years on.

  • In the Roman Church the bishop blesses the oil of the sick used in extreme unctions on Holy Thursday at the Chrismal Mass,' using the following prayer of the sacramentaries of Gelasius and Hadrian: "Send forth, we pray Thee, 0 Lord, Thy holy spirit, the Paraclete from Heaven, into this fatness of oil, which Thou hast deigned to produce from the green wood for refreshment of mind and body; and through Thy holy benediction may it be for all that anoint, taste, touch, a protection of mind and body, of soul and spirit, unto the easing away of all pain, all weakness, all sickness of mind and body; wherefore Thou hast anointed priest, kings and prophets and martyrs with thy chrism, perfected by Thee, 0 Lord, blessed and abiding in our bowels in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ."

  • God can be personal and doubtless is (though he has no Non-ego to define himself against) through contrast of passing conscious states with the abiding Ego.

  • And yet, notwithstanding all this, and partly because of all this, real and distinct Norman influence has been far more extensive and far more abiding in England than it has been in Sicily.

  • The abiding tradition of the Cretan aborigines, as preserved by Herodotus (vii.

  • The impression made by him in parliament is in some danger of being forgotten, because he was not instrumental in carrying any great measure that might serve as an abiding memorial.

  • As for the innumerable other poems, dramas and tales which have been founded on the legend of the Cid, from the days of Guillen de Castro and Diamante to those of Quintana and Trueba, they serve merely to prove the abiding popularity of the national hero in his native land.

  • As an exegete and biblical critic no less than as a grammarian he has left his abiding mark.

  • The most important fact in his history is his confession, recorded by Orosius, that he saw the inability of his countrymen to rear a civilized or abiding kingdom, and that consequently his aim should be to build on Roman foundations and blend the two nations into one.

  • Henry was too young to have carried away any abiding impressions, yet throughout his life his character, dress and bearing were far more Spanish than French.

  • The following are the more important works - some of them were rewritten and in a measure recast, and the date given is not necessarily that of the first appearance of the book, but of its more complete and abiding form:.

  • The abiding interest in Korner is patriotic and political rather than literary.

  • In that manner his influence, as represented by the text of many a statute regulating the relations between Austria and Hungary, is one of an abiding character.

  • It may be said generally that Catharism formed the abiding background of medieval heresy.

  • But Anabaptism was not to remain an abiding force on the continent; and though colonies of its exiles settled in England, they did not produce the Congregationalism which sprang up there under Elizabeth.

  • It will then apply the tests thus gained to the narratives special to this Gospel; and point out the book's special difficulties and limits, and its abiding appeal and greatness.

  • 26, 27); the sign which follows is but the pictorial representation of this abiding truth.

  • The difficulties, limitations and temporary means special to the book are closely connected with its ready appeal and abiding power; let us take both sets of things together, in three couples of interrelated price and gift.

  • Scott's The Fourth Gospel (1906) gives a lucid, critical and religiously tempered account of the Gospel's ideas, aims, affinities, difficulties and abiding significance.

  • arbitrari, to examine or judge), a term derived from the nomenclature of Roman law, and applied to an arrangement for taking, and abiding by, the judgment of a selected person in some disputed matter, instead of carrying it to the established courts of justice.

  • Her whole life, public and private, was an abiding lesson in the paramount importance of character.

  • He regarded the abiding life of Rome as "the central truth of European history," the bond of its unity, and he undertook his History of Sicily (1891-1894) partly because it illustrated this unity.

  • In this idea Paul also shared, but he carried the matter farther than most of his contemporaries and saw in the Spirit the abiding power and ground of the Christian life.

  • The opening pages of his commentaries on the Iliad and the Odyssey dwell with enthusiasm on the abiding influence of Homer on the literature of Greece.

  • There is also a spiritual chewing of the body of Christ, not such that by it we understand the very food to be changed into spirit, but such that, the body and blood of the Lord abiding in their essence and peculiarity, they are spiritually communicated to us, not in any corporeal way, but in a spiritual, through the Holy Spirit which applies and bestows on us those things which were prepared through the flesh and blood of the Lord betrayed for our sake to death, to wit, remission of sins, liberation and life eternal, so that Christ lives in us and we in him...

  • But These Very Digressions' Give The Book Its Intimate And Abiding Charm; For They Keep The Reader In Close Personal Touch With Every Side Of Canadian Life, With Songs And Tales And Homely Forms Of Speech, With The Best Features Of Seigniorial Times And The Strong Guidance Of An Ardent Church, With Voyageurs, Coureurs De Bois, Indians,., Soldiers, Sailors And All The Strenuous Adventurers Of A Wild, New, Giant World.

  • But the abiding value of his work lies in his preservation of facts in Roman history, religion, antiquities and language, which but for him might have perished.

  • an abiding title to fame.

  • Essential modifications could not, of course, be at once effected or even indicated in a power whose life-blood is tradition, and whose main strength has always lain in calmly abiding the issue of events and in temporizing.

  • His mind was cultivated; he was a discriminating patron of literature, and Westminster Abbey is an abiding memorial of his artistic taste.

  • Sometimes the good find their abiding home with the gods; sometimes a number of heavens of varying degrees of blessedness is recognized (see F.

  • Owing to his pure biblical style he had an abiding influence on subsequent liturgical writers.

  • On the other hand, at Messina there were few or none, and we hear of both Saracen and Greek villeins, the latter doubtless abiding as they were in Saracen times.

  • The rest of Palermo was soon granted; the Semitic capital became the abiding head of Sicily.

  • The attack on the empire had, however, no abiding results.

  • Many are the pet names, the poetic epithets bestowed upon it - the harbour of refuge, the cool cave, the island amidst the floods, the place of bliss, emancipation, liberation, safety, the supreme, the transcendent, the uncreated, the tranquil, the home of peace, the calm, the end of suffering, the medicine for all evil, the unshaken, the ambrosia, the immaterial, the imperishable, the abiding, the farther shore, the unending, the bliss of effort, the supreme joy, the ineffable, the detachment, the holy city, and many' others.

  • As a historian, indeed, he left no abiding work; the multiplicity of his interests prevented him from concentrating on any one subject.

  • In Leipzig Goethe also had time for what remained one of the abiding interests of his life, for art; he regarded A.

  • She is not mentioned in Homer, although the hearth is recognized as a place of refuge for suppliants; this seems to show that her worship was not universally acknowledged at the time of the Homeric poems. In post-Homeric religion she is one of the twelve Olympian deities, but, as the abiding goddess of the household, she never leaves Olympus.

  • This incident it simply did not fall within the scope of Acts (see below) to narrate, since it had no abiding effect on the Church's extension.

  • These poorer people - who were not, however, "poor whites" - developed an abiding hostility towards the oligarchy.

  • The journey to Italy made by the king in 1154 was the precursor of five other expeditions which engaged his main energies for thirty years, during which the subjugation of the peninsula was the central and abiding aim of his policy.

  • In the numberless transitions that, whilst connecting, separate the spell and the prayer we observe as the accompaniment of every mood from extreme imperiousness to extreme humility an abiding will and desire to help the action out.

  • For with the same thou hast anointed priests, kings, and prophets and martyrs with this thy chrism, perfected by thee, 0 Lord, blessed, abiding within our bowels in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ."

  • The abiding result of his tutorship is a code of carefully graduated moral lessons - the Fables, the Dialogues of the Dead (a series of imaginary conversations between departed heroes), and finally Telemaque, where the adventures of the son of Ulysses in search of a father are made into a political novel with a purpose.

  • It is under the abiding influence of the Holy Ghost, and therefore cannot err in matters of faith.

  • History is thus represented by Hegel, for example, as the realization of the idea of freedom, or rather as the reconciliation of individual freedom and the play of cultured interests with the stable objectivity of law and an abiding consciousness of the greater whole in which we move.

  • The absence of water and of large trees is one of the most abiding impressions of the traveller.

  • The assurance of its own unique value that such wisdom involved they held to be an abiding possession for those who had attained it; 3 and without this assurance no act could be truly wise or virtuous.

  • The bliss to which the soul attains, by the extinction of desire, in the supreme home, is not absorption in the Lord, but union with Him in abiding individuality.

  • Indeed, the cornerstone of State sovereignty provides an abiding subtext to assertions of rights of transit.

  • It is a measure of the abiding affection for this apparently throwaway pop group that they are still well remembered nine years on.

  • Mankiw has had an abiding intellectual fascination with A W Phillips '1958 postulation of a trade-off between wage inflation and unemployment.

  • Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night, He indeed is " Auspicious " called, described as a sage at peace.

  • Abiding by the dictionary's definition of gourmet, there are thousands of fine foods that fit the bill.

  • Abiding by this will likely help you get the 5 servings of fruits and vegetables recommended daily!

  • Abiding by those rules insures that the park is a success and encourages cities to expand to other park facilities.

  • This often involves abiding by stringent federal and local regulations, learning ever-evolving technologies, and adapting to new trends in building and interior design.

  • In fact, if a contact lens provider does not require a prescription-even for plano lenses-they are not abiding by FDA guidelines.

  • Aside from the other Scary Movie films, you may remember her from Law Abiding Citizen, First Sunday, The Elder Son, The Other Brother, or in 25 episodes of Ally McBeal.

  • Abiding by the meaning of tantra, which is "expansion," a follower of Shakti focuses on the dynamic aspect of divinity, the Cosmic Mother.

  • At first, he created them simply to give to family and friends and to express his artistic talents and abiding faith.

  • There is also no doubt that these ladies have a deep and abiding passion for the game of American football.

  • Copyright infringement is an often fuzzy topic among even the most law abiding citizen.

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