Aberdeen sentence example

aberdeen
  • at Aberdeen, Monroe county, on the 13th of February 1899, and 107° F.
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  • There was also a small sheet of white paper listing 11.2 gallons of gas purchased in Aberdeen, Maryland, a mileage figure and the amount of the purchase.
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  • of Aberdeen by the Great North of Scotland railway.
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  • The university of Aberdeen conferred upon him the honorary degree of D.D.
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  • 26 1829, the youngest son of the 4th Earl of Aberdeen.
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  • Many condemnations followed, and hundreds of politicals were immured in hideous dungeons, a state of things which provoked Gladstones famous letters to Lord Aberdeen, in which Bourbon rule was branded for all time as the negation of God erected into a system of government.
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  • It is certain that he was a secular priest, and that he composed his history in the latter part of the 14th century; and it is probable that he was a chaplain in the cathedral of Aberdeen.
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  • of Aberdeen by rail, on the Great North of Scotland railway.
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  • He held the chair of Natural Philosophy in Marischal College, Aberdeen, from 1856 till the fusion of the two colleges there in 1860.
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  • In July of the same year he proceeded to the north to debate on the " Covenant " with the famous Aberdeen doctors; but he was not well received by them.
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  • ALEXANDER ARBUTHNOT (1538-1583), Scottish ecclesiastic and poet, educated at St Andrews and Bourges, was in 1569 elected principal of King's College, Aberdeen, which office he retained until his death.
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  • In 1908 a state tuberculosis sanatorium was opened near Aberdeen, Moore county.
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  • Reid graduated at Aberdeen in 1726, and remained there as librarian to the university for ten years, a period which he devoted largely to mathematical reading.
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  • In 1737 he was presented to the living of Newmachar near Aberdeen.
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  • In 1752 the professors of King's College, Aberdeen, elected him to the chair of philosophy, which he held for twelve years.
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  • The foundation of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society (the "Wise Club"), which numbered among its members Campbell, Beattie, Gerard and Dr John Gregory, was mainly owing to the exertions of Reid, who was secretary for the first year (1758).
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  • Many of the subjects of discussion were drawn from Hume's speculations; and during the last years of his stay in Aberdeen Reid propounded his new point of view in several papers read before the society.
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  • Hamilton's edition of Reid also contains an account of the university of Glasgow and a selection of Reid's letters, chiefly addressed to his Aberdeen friends the Skenes, to Lord Kames, and to Dr James Gregory.
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  • Before this time, however, he had become earl of Aberdeen on his grandfather's death in 1801, and had travelled over a large part of the con iinent of Europe, meeting on his journeys Napoleon Bonaparte and other persons of distinction.
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  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."
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  • Returning home he was created a peer of the United Kingdom as Viscount Gordon of Aberdeen (1814), and made a member of the privy council.
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  • During the ensuing thirteen years Aberdeen took a less prominent part in public affairs, although he succeeded in passing the Entail (Scotland) Act of 1825.
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  • As a Scotsman, Aberdeen was interested in the ecclesiastical controversy which culminated in the disruption of 1843.
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  • During the short administration of Sir Robert Peel in 1834 and 1835, Aberdeen had filled the office of secretary for the colonies, and in September 1841 he took office again under Peel, on this occasion as foreign secretary; the five years during which he held this position were the most fruitful and successful of his public life.
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  • Although united on free trade and in general on questions of domestic reform, a cabinet which contained Lord Palmerston and Lord John Russell, in addition to Aberdeen, was certain to differ on questions of foreign policy.
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  • The tortuous negotiations which preceded the struggle need not be discussed here, but in defence of Aberdeen it may be said that he hoped and strove for peace to the last.
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  • Palmerston, supported by Russell and well served by Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, British ambassador at Constantinople, favoured a more aggressive policy, and Aberdeen, unable to control Palmerston, and unwilling to let Russell go, cannot be exonerated from blame.
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  • Treat?ng this as a vote of want of confidence Aberdeen at once res'gned office, and the queen bestowed upon him the order of the Garter.
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  • Aberdeen was a distinguished scholar with a retentive memory and a wide knowledge of literature and art.
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  • Aberdeen was a model landlord.
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  • He wrote An Inquiry into the Principles of Beauty in Grecian Architecture (London, 1822), and the Correspondence of the Earl of Aberdeen has been printed privately under the direction of his son, Lord Stanmore.
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  • was conferred upon Brewster by Marischal College, Aberdeen; in 1815 he was made a member of the Royal Society of London, and received the Copley medal; in 1818 he received the Rumford medal of the society; and in 1816 the French Institute awarded him one-half of the prize of three thousand francs for the two most important discoveries in physical science made in Europe during the two preceding years.
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  • In Aberdeen the Quakers took considerable hold, and were there joined by .some persons of influence and position, especially Alexander Jaffray, sometime provost of Aberdeen, and Colonel David Barclay of Ury and his son Robert, the author of the Apology.
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  • England asserted by the Aberdeen Act (1845) the right of seizing suspected craft in Brazilian waters.
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  • JOHN HILL BURTON (1809-1881), Scottish historical writer, the son of an officer in the army, was born at Aberdeen on the 22nd of August 1809.
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  • He signed the Covenant, and was told off to suppress the opposition to the popular cause which arose around Aberdeen and in the country of the Gordons.
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  • Three times, in July 1638, and in March and June 1639, Montrose entered Aberdeen, where he succeeded in effecting his object, on the second occasion carrying off the head of the Gordons, the marquess of Huntly, as a prisoner to Edinburgh, though in so doing, for the first and last time in his life, he violated a safeconduct.
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  • At Tippermuir and Aberdeen he routed Covenanting levies; at Inverlochy he crushed the Campbells, at Auldearn, Alford and Kilsyth his victories were obtained over well-led and disciplined armies.
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  • His strategy at Dundee and Inverlochy, his tactics at Aberdeen, Auldearn and Kilsyth furnished models of the military art, but above all his daring and constancy marked him out as the greatest soldier of the war, Cromwell alone excepted.
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  • He protests against Peel's Income Tax Bill of 1842; against the Aberdeen Act 1843, as conferring undue power on church courts; against the perpetuation of diocesan courts for probate and administration; against Lord Stanley's absurd bill providing compensation for the destruction of fences to dispossessed Irish tenants; and against the Parliamentary Proceedings Bill, which proposed that all bills, except money bills, having reached a certain stage or having passed one House, should be continued to next session.
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  • JOHN ABERCROMBIE (1780-1844), Scottish physician, was the son of the Rev. George Abercrombie of Aberdeen, where he was born on the 10th of October 1780.
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  • In 1511 he accompanied the queen to Aberdeen and commemorated her visit in verse.
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  • 58, and Arundel 285,285, in the British Museum; in the Reidpath MS. in the university library of Cambridge; and in the Aberdeen Register of Sasines.
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  • His elder brother James, who just outlived him, was Conservative M.P. for Glasgow and Aberdeen Universities from 1880 to 1906.
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  • Lord Ripon became leader in the House of Lords; and Lord Elgin (colonial secretary), Lord Carrington(agriculture), Lord Aberdeen (lord lieutenant of Ireland), Sir Henry Fowler (chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster), Mr Sidney Buxton (postmaster-general), Mr L.
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  • Allardyce (Aberdeen, 1895-1896); James Hogg, The Jacobite Relics of Scotland (Edinburgh, 1819-1821); and F.
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  • of Aberdeen, from which there is a branch line, of which it is the terminus, of the Great North of Scotland railway.
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  • It follows a generally easterly course, roughly parallel with that of the Dee, and a few miles to the south of it, falling into the North Sea close to Old Aberdeen, after a run of 82 m.
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  • He was the first tenant farmer to represent a Scottish constituency, and was returned to parliament, unopposed, as Liberal member for the western division of Aberdeen in 1868.
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  • of Kirkwall; and steamers sail at regular intervals from the harbour to Wick, Aberdeen and Leith.
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  • In 1855 he refused from Lord Palmerston an office not connected with foreign affairs, was elected lord rector of Aberdeen university, and on 15th June moved a resolution in the House of Commons (defeated by a large majority) declaring that in public appointments merit had been sacrificed to private influence and an adherence to routine.
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  • The southern coast in particular is deeply indented; and there two bold peninsulas, extending for several miles into the sea, form two capacious natural harbours, namely, Deep Water Bay, with the village of Stanley to the east, and Tytam Bay, which has a safe, well-protected entrance showing a depth of 10 to 16 fathoms. An in-shore island on the west coast, called Aberdeen, or Taplishan, affords protection to the Shekpywan or Aberdeen harbour, an inlet provided with a granite graving dock, the caisson gate of which is 60 ft.
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  • There is a railway station at Bridge of Banff communicating, via Inveramsay, with Aberdeen, and another at the harbour, communicating with Portsoy and Keith.
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  • of Aberdeen.
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  • Among other missionary labours of his later years, he helped the Free Church mission on Lake Nyassa, travelled to Syria to inspect a mission at Lebanon, and assisted Lady Aberdeen and Lord Polwarth to establish the Gordon Memorial Mission in Natal.
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  • Owing to the opposition of Lord Aberdeen, however, the presentation was cancelled.
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  • Immediately after the meeting of parliament Gladstone was promoted to the under-secretaryship for the colonies, where his official chief was Lord Aberdeen.
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  • Lord Aberdeen became prime minister, and Gladstone chancellor of the exchequer.
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  • of Aberdeen), and many distinguished men in church and state were his personal friends.
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  • He was one of those who took a middle course in the non-intrusion controversy, holding that the fitness of those who were presented to parishes should be judged by the presbyteries - the principle of Lord Aberdeen's Bill.
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  • Blackmore (Aberdeen, 1845), p. xxv.
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  • See also Historical Notices of St Fillan's Crozier, by Dr John Stuart (Aberdeen, 1877).
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  • In 1893 he went to Aberdeen, and finally in 1895 to the chair of logic at Glasgow, which he held till his death on the 5th of February 1902.
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  • ALEXANDER BAIN (1818-1903), Scottish philosopher and educationalist, was born on the 11th of June 1818 in Aberdeen, where he received his first schooling.
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  • In 1860 he was appointed by the crown to the new chair of logic and English in the university of Aberdeen (created on the amalgamation of the two colleges, King's and Marischal, by the Scottish Universities Commission of 1858).
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  • Up to this date neither logic nor English had received adequate attention in Aberdeen, and Bain devoted himself to supplying these deficiencies.
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  • All these works, from the Higher English Grammar downwards, were written by Bain during his twenty years' professoriate at Aberdeen.
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  • His last years were spent in privacy at Aberdeen, where he died on the 18th of September 1903.
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  • But he also took a keen interest and frequently an active part in the political and social movements of the day; and so highly did the students of Aberdeen rate his practical ability, that, after his retirement from the chair of logic, they twice in succession elected him lord rector of the university, each term of office extending over three years.
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  • Davidson of Aberdeen University, who further contributed to Mind (April 1904) a review of Bain's services to philosophy.
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  • In 1909 he was appointed principal of the University of Aberdeen.
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  • degrees from Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins, Aberdeen, St.
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  • He was the author of The Religious Aspects of Philosophy (1885); California (1886, in the American Commonwealth Series) The Feud of Oakfield Creek (1887, a novel); The Spirit of Modern Philosophy (1892); The Conception of God (1895); Studies of Good and Evil (1898); The World and the Individual (2 vols., 1900-1, Gifford Lectures at the university of Aberdeen); The Conception of Immortality (1900); Outlines of Psychology (1903); Herbert Spencer: An Estimate and Review (1904); The Philosophy of Loyalty (1908); Race Questions, Provincialism and Other American Problems (1908);' William James and Other Essays on the Philosophy of Life (1911); Bross Lectures on the Sources of Religious Insight (1912); The Problem of Christianity (2 vols., 1913, lectures before Manchester College, Oxford); War and Insurance (1914); The Hope of the Great Community (1916, war addresses) and the posthumously published Lectures on Modern Idealism (1919).
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  • at Aberdeen in the northern part of the James River Valley to 25° at Rapid City, in the Black Hills district.
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  • at Aberdeen.
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  • In 1900 there were seven cities having 3000 or more inhabitants: Sioux Falls with 10,266; Lead, 6210;6210; Yankton, 4125; Aberdeen, 4087; Mitchell, 40J5; Deadwood, 3498; and Waterton, 3352.1 1 In 1905, according to a state census, there were nine cities with 3000 or more inhabitants, showing some changes in order of size: In 1906 the total number of communicants of different religious denominations in the state was 161,951, of whom 61,014 were Roman Catholics, 45,018 Lutherans, 16,143 Methodists, 8599 Congregationalists, 7055 Protestant Episcopalians, 6990 Presbyterians and 6198 Baptists.
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  • The judicial department consists of the supreme court, circuit courts, county courts, justices of the peace, and police Sioux Falls, 12,283; Lead, 8052; Aberdeen, 5841; Mitchell, 5719; Watertown, 5164;5164; Deadwood, 4364; Yankton, 4189; Huron, 3783;3783; Brookings, 3265.
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  • The leading state institutions are the state university (1882) at Vermilion, the agricultural college (1884) and the agricultural experiment station at Brookings, the state school of mines (1886) at Rapid City, and normal schools at Spearfish, Madison, Aberdeen and Springfield.
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  • The Norwegian Lutherans have a normal school at Sioux Falls, and the Roman Catholics have schools of higher grade at Sioux Falls, Deadwood and Aberdeen.
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  • And for administration and history see Hagerty, The Territory of Dakota (Aberdeen, 1889); E.
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  • Sir Robert was ready to form a cabinet in which the duke of Wellington, Lords Lyndhurst, Aberdeen and Stanley, and Sir James Graham would have served; but he stipulated that the mistress of the robes and the ladies of the bedchamber appointed by the Whig administration should be removed, and to this the queen would not consent.
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  • This gave infinite pain to the queen, and at length she wrote to Lord Aberdeen on the subject.
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  • - Description: The State of North Dakota: The Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract (Aberdeen, S.D., 1889), prepared by Frank H.
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  • Of his writings he gives an account in his Catalogus lucubrationum, composed first in January 1523 and enlarged in September 1524; and also in a letter to Hector Boece of Aberdeen, written in 1530.
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  • After completing the usual course at King's College, Aberdeen, young Chalmers studied law in Edinburgh for several years.
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  • In 1852 he was elected bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane, and was consecrated in Aberdeen early next year.
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  • Educated at Repton, whence he proceeded to Aberdeen University, he became in 1817 vicar of Little Horwood, Buckinghamshire, and devoted his spare time to literature and particularly to the study of Anglo-Saxon.
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  • JOHN STRACHAN (1778-1867), first bishop of Toronto, son of John Strachan and Elizabeth Finlayson his wife, was born at Aberdeen, Scotland, on the 12th of April 1778.
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  • He managed, by undertaking private teaching and with the aid of a bursary, to go to the university of Aberdeen, where he took his M.A.
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  • from his alma mater, Aberdeen University.
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  • C. Eeles, Reservation of the Holy Eucharist in the Scottish Church (Aberdeen, 1899); Bishop J.
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  • He took his degree at Aberdeen University, and migrated thence to London, studying at Highbury College for the Congregational ministry.
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  • of Aberdeen, with stations on the Great North of Scotland and Highland railways.
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  • The following governorsgeneral have represented the crown since the federation of the provinces, with the year of their appointment: Viscount Monck, 1867; Sir John Young (afterwards Baron Lisgar), 1868; the earl of Dufferin, 1872; the marquess of Lorne (afterwards duke of Argyll), 1878; the marquess of Lansdowne, 1883; Lord Stanley of Preston (afterwards earl of Derby), 1888; the earl of Aberdeen, 1893; the earl of Minto, 1898; Earl Grey, 1904.
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  • It consists of two quarters, the old town picturesquely situated on the south bank of the Carron and the new on the land between this stream and the Cowie, the two being connected by the bridge which carries the main road from the south to Aberdeen.
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  • distant, a favourite residential resort of Aberdeen citizens, begins at Stonehaven.
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  • James Nicol (1769-1819), the poet, was minister of Traquair, and his son James Nicol (1810-1879), the geologist and professor of natural history in Aberdeen University, was born in the manse.
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  • ALEXANDER WHYTE (1837-), Scottish divine, was born at Kirriemuir in Forfarshire on the 13th of January 1837, and was educated at the university of Aberdeen and at New College, Edinburgh.
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  • He was in 1762 ordained minister of the church of Kirkcudbright, a position which he soon resigned; in 1767 the degree of doctor in divinity was conferred on him by Marischal College, Aberdeen.
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  • Churches of this order were founded in Paisley, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leith, Arbroath, Montrose, Aberdeen, Dunkeld, Cupar, Galashiels, Liverpool and London, where Michael Faraday was long an elder.
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  • He was educated at the New Academy and afterwards at the Marischal College, in Aberdeen, where his father was manager of the Commerical Bank.
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  • After attending classes at Edinburgh University (1825-1826), Blackie spent three years at Aberdeen as a student of theology.
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  • In 1890 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Aberdeen gave him its honorary LL.D., and in 1899 he was appointed Gifford lecturer by that university, but declined on grounds of health.
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  • He assisted in the reconstruction of Aberdeen University in 1575, and in order that he might do for St Andrews what he had done for Glasgow, he was appointed principal of St Mary's College, St Andrews, in 1580.
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  • In a letter of safe-conduct dated 1357, allowing him to go to Oxford for study, he is described as archdeacon of Aberdeen.
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  • The only biographical evidence of his closing years is his signature as a witness to sundry deeds in the "Register of Aberdeen" as late as 1392.
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  • According to the obit-book of the cathedral of Aberdeen, he died on the 13th of March 1395.
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  • From the south the city is entered by the North British railway and the Caledonian railway (which also runs west to St Fillans, east to Dundee and north-west to Aberdeen); and from the north by the Highland railway, the three systems utilizing a general station in the south-west of the town.
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  • of Aberdeen and 444 m.
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  • It formerly had an extensive trade with the ports of the Baltic, the Levant and America, and was once a sub-port to Aberdeen, but was made independent in 1832.
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  • Sometimes the bags are made of enormous size, as at Aberdeen breakwater, where the contents of each bag weighed 50 tons.
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  • He was sent in 1753 to King's College, Aberdeen, removing two years later to Marischal College.
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  • At the age of thirteen he entered King's College, Aberdeen, where the first prize in mathematics and physical and moral sciences fell to him.
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  • On the 25th of March 1783 he was chosen their bishop by ten episcopal clergymen of Connecticut, meeting in Woodbury; as he could not take the British oath of allegiance, Seabury was shut out from consecration by the English bishops, and he was consecrated by Scotch bishops at Aberdeen on the 14th of November 1784.
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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.
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  • In 1779 he was presented to the chair of natural philosophy at Aberdeen University.
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  • Having taken Forts George and Augustus, and after varying success against the supporters of the government in the north, he at last prepared to face the duke of Cumberland, who had passed the early spring at Aberdeen.
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  • In 1736 both the universities at Aberdeen gave him the degree of D.D.
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  • 31 1864 at Aberdeen, son of John Marshall Lang, sometime moderator of the Church of Scotland, and educated at Glasgow University until 1882, when he won a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford.
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  • degree from Aberdeen University, and in 1883 he was moderator of the general assembly of his church.
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  • WILLIAM ELPHINSTONE (1431-1514), Scottish statesman and prelate, founder of the university of Aberdeen, was born in Glasgow, and educated at the university of his native city, taking the degree of M.A.
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  • of England; in 1483 he was appointed bishop of Aberdeen, although his consecration was delayed for four years; and he was sent on missions to England, both before and after the death of Richard III.
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  • Although he attended the meetings of parliament with great regularity he did not neglect his episcopal duties, and the fabric of the cathedral of Aberdeen owes much to his care.
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  • Early in 1488 the bishop was made lord high chancellor, but on the king's death in the following June he vacated this office, and retired to Aberdeen.
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  • Having been made keeper of the privy seal in 1492, and having arranged a dispute between the Scotch and the Dutch, the bishop's concluding years were mainly spent in the foundation of the university of Aberdeen.
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  • The papal bull for this purpose was obtained in 1494, and the royal charter which made old Aberdeen the seat of a university is dated 1498.
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  • Moir (Aberdeen, 1894); Fasti Aberdonenses, edited by C. Innes (Aberdeen, 1854); and A.
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  • Laing (Aberdeen, 1878).
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  • His early life has been the subject of many conjectures; but apparently he graduated M.A., probably at King's College, Aberdeen, and taught as a schoolmaster at Montrose.
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  • He studied at Aberdeen, and, after passing his law examinations in Edinburgh, he quickly took a leading position at the Scottish bar, being made a Lord of Session in 1767 with the title of Lord Monboddo.
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  • In 1878 he was elected Lord Rector of Aberdeen and in 1880 of Edinburgh University, where he gave an eloquent address upon Patriotism.
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  • The burghs in which the largest proportion of Scottish-born persons lived in 1901 were Kirkcaldy (with 95'997 in every loo of its inhabitants), Aberdeen (with 94'997), Perth (with 94.44 2) and Kilmarnock (with 94.046).
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  • The counties in which the highest percentages of illegitimate births were found were Wigtown, Dumfries, Kirkcudbright and Peebles in the south; Elgin, Banff and Aberdeen in the north-east, and Caithness in the north; the shires showing the lowest percentages were Clackmannan, Dumbarton and Shetland.
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  • In virtue of a Continuation Class code, technical and specialized education is given in day and, chiefly, evening classes in various centres, the principal being the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh; the Edinburgh and East of Scotland College of Agriculture; the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College; the Glasgow School of Art; the Glasgow Athenaeum Commercial College; the West of Scotland Agricultural College; the Dundee Technical Institute; Gray's School of Art, Aberdeen; the Edinburgh Royal Institution School of Art, and the Edinburgh School of Applied Art; but wellequipped classes are held in most of the large towns, and several county councils maintain organizers of technical instruction.
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  • As regards agricultural education, the county is found to be in most cases too small an area for efficient organization, and consequently several counties combine to support, for instance, the East of Scotland Agricultural College - a corporation consisting of the agricultural department in the University, the Heriot-Watt College and the Veterinary College in Edinburgh, - the West of Scotland Agricultural College, Glasgow, and the agricultural department in Aberdeen University.
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  • There are four universities in Scotland, namely (in the order of foundation), St Andrews (1411), Glasgow (1450), Aberdeen (1494) and Edinburgh (1582), in which are the customary faculties of arts, divinity, law, medicine and science.
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  • The United Free Church maintains colleges at Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and there is a Roman Catholic college at Blairs near Aberdeen, besides a monastery and college at Fort Augustus.
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  • In Perth, Fife, Forfar and Aberdeen the average was 30%; but in nearly all the counties, towards the end at least of the period of depression, the coexistent demand and competition for farms were observable.
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  • The breeds include the Ayrshire, noted milkers and specially adapted for dairy farms (which prevail in the south-west), which in this respect have largely supplanted the Galloway in their native district; the polled Angus or Aberdeen, fair milkers, but valuable for their beef-making qualities, and on this account, as well as their hardihood, in great favour in the north-east, where cattlefeeding has been carried to perfection; and the West Highland or Kyloe breed, a picturesque breed with long horns, shaggy coats and decided colours-black, red, dun, cream and brindle-that thrives well on wild and healthy pasture.
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  • Inverness, Aberdeen and Perth are naturally the best wooded shires.
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  • The Scottish seaboard is divided for administrative purposes into twenty-seven fishery districts, namely, on the east coast, Eyemouth, Leith, Anstruther, Montrose, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, Fraserburgh, Banff, Buckie, Findhorn, Cromarty, Helmsdale, Lybster, Wick (15); on the north, Orkney, Shetland (2); on the west, Stornoway, Barra, Loch Broom, Loch Carron and Skye, Fort William, Campbeltown, Inverary, Rothesay, Greenock, Ballantrae (10).
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  • The most prolific districts are Shetland in the north, Fraserburgh, Peterhead, Wick, Aberdeen and Anstruther in the east, and Stornoway in the west.
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  • Over the principal rivers at this early period there were bridges near the most populous places, as over the Dee near Aberdeen, the Esk at Brechin, the Tay at Perth and the Forth near Stirling.
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  • The counties in which the manufacture is now most largely carried on are Forfar, Perth, Fife and Aberdeen, but Renfrew, Lanark, Edinburgh and Ayr are also extensively associated with it.
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  • It should be added that on the figures of import and export value in 1909, Aberdeen had changed places with Methil, and Burntisland with Granton.
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  • On the east coast the leading yards are at Leith, Kirkcaldy, Grangemouth, Dundee, Peterhead and Aberdeen, which, in the days of sailing ships, was renowned for its clippers built for the tea trade.
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  • For parliamentary purposes some counties have been united, as Clackmannan and Kinross, Elgin and Nairn, Orkney and Shetland, and Peebles and Selkirk, and others divided, as Aberdeen, Ayr, Lanark, Perth and Renfrew, while others retain in certain respects their old subdivision, Lanarkshire for assessment purposes being still partitioned into the upper, middle and lower wards.
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  • The counties are thirty-three in number, Ross and Cromarty constituting one, while Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee are each a county of a city.
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  • Only Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Greenock, Aberdeen and Paisley have private and local acts, conferring powers exceeding the general law, to deal with, e.g.
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  • The corporation of the burghs consists of the provost (or lord provost, in the cases of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee), bailies and councillors, with certain permanent officials, of whom the town clerk is the most important.
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  • In the winter of 1307 and in 1308 Bruce ruined Buchan, a Comyn territory, and won the castles of Aberdeen and Forfar, while Edward Bruce cleared the English out of Galloway.
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  • from the university of Aberdeen, and had been made an honorary member of the Society of Antiquaries, in the institution of which he had taken a very active part.
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  • He was appointed regent, or professor, of philosophy in the college of Montaigu; and there he was a contemporary of Erasmus, who in two epistles has spoken of him in the highest terms. When William Elphinstone, bishop of Aberdeen, was laying his plans for the foundation of the university of Aberdeen (King's College) he made Boece his chief adviser; and the latter was persuaded, after receipt of the papal bull erecting the university (1494), to be the first principal.
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  • He was in Aberdeen about 150o when lectures began in the new buildings, and he appears to have been well received by the canons of the cathedral, several of whom he has commemorated as men of learning.
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  • The emoluments of his office were poor, but he also enjoyed the income of a canonry at Aberdeen and of the vicarage of Tullynessle.
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  • Under the date of 14th July 1527, we find a "grant to Maister Hector" of an annual pension of £50, to be paid by the sheriff of Aberdeen out of the king's casualties; and on the 26th of July 1529 was issued a "precept for a lettre to Mr Hector Boys, professor of theology, of a pension of £50 Scots yearly, until the king promote him to a benefice of loo marks Scots of yearly value; the said pension to be paid him by the custumars of Aberdeen."
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  • at Aberdeen; and on this occasion the magistrates voted him a present of a tun of wine when the new wines should arrive, or, according to his option, the sum of £ 20 to purchase bonnets.
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  • He died at Aberdeen, and was buried before the high altar at King's College, beside the tomb of his patron Bishop Elphinstone.
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  • See also Balfour Stewart, Report of the British Association, Aberdeen, 1859, 200, a description of the type of instrument used in the older observatories; E.
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  • The Scottish Benefices Act of Lord Aberdeen, 1843, gave the people power to state objections personal to a presentee, and bearing on his fitness for the particular charge to which he was presented, and also authorized the presbytery in dealing with the objections to look to the number and character of the objectors.
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  • The church continued till lately to carry on normal schools for the training of teachers in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen; but these, along with the normal schools of the United Free Church, were recently made over to the state.
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  • The working of Lord Aberdeen's Act had given rise to many unedifying scenes and to lengthy struggles over disputed settlements, and it was early felt that some change at least was necessary in Aboli- the law.
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  • There are six dioceses (two archbishops, one of Edinburgh and St Andrews and the other of Glasgow; and four suffragans, Aberdeen, Argyll and the Isles, Dunkeld and Galloway), with, in 1909, 550 priests; 398 churches, chapels and stations; and a Roman Catholic population estimated at about 519,000.
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  • rector of the Perth grammar school and then (appointed by Cromwell) principal of King's College, Aberdeen, who, with his father and grandfather was a famour Hebraist, but left the Church of Scotland to become an Independent minister.
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  • In Scotland the only one which has survived the convulsions of the i 6th century is that of Aberdeen, a Scottish form of the Sarum Office,' revised by William Elphinstone (bishop 1483-1514), and printed at Edinburgh by Walter Chapman and Andrew Myllar in 1509-1510.
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  • The new Scottish Proprium sanctioned for the Roman Catholic province of St Andrews in 1903 contains many of the old Aberdeen collects and antiphons.
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  • He was educated at home and at Aberdeen University, where he attained the highest academic distinctions, winning among other things the Ferguson mathematical scholarship, which is open to all graduates of Scottish universities under three years' standing.
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  • In 1870 he was appointed and ordained to the office of professor of Oriental languages and Old Testament exegesis at the Free Church College, Aberdeen, and here he began that series of theological investigations which, characterized as they were by learned research and the use of the most scientific methods, were destined to make his name famous.
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  • In 1886 he became university librarian, and in 1889 Adams Professor of Arabic. In1888-1891he delivered, as Burnett lecturer, three courses of lectures at Aberdeen on the primitive religion of the Semites.
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  • He proceeded to Falkland near Perth and passed through Aberdeen, where he saw the mutilated arm of Montrose suspended over the city gate.
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  • Adams's "Commentary" in his Medical Works of Paulus Aegineta (London and Aberdeen, 1834); J.
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  • An Aberdeen printer named Raban was publicly censured for having on his own authority shortened one of the prayers.
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  • WILLIAM FORBES SKENE (1809-1892), Scottish historian and antiquary, was the second son of Sir Walter Scott's friend, James Skene (1775-1864), of Rubislaw, near Aberdeen, and was born on the 7th of June 1809.
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  • The pearl mussel was formerly used as bait in the Aberdeen cod fishery.
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  • After 1882 Hunter took up politics and was elected to parliament for Aberdeen as a Liberal in 1885.
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  • At all times conspicuous for his eloquence, honesty and recalcitrancy, he twice came with especial prominence before the public - in 1838, when, although at the time without a seat in parliament, he appeared at the bar of the Commons to protest, in the name of the Canadian Assembly, against the suspension of the Canadian constitution; and in 1855, when, having overthrown Lord Aberdeen's ministry by carrying a resolution for the appointment of a committee of inquiry into the mismanagement in the Crimean War, he presided over its proceedings.
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  • He was educated at the university of Aberdeen, where he took the degree of M.A.
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  • In 1538 he obtained a dispensation permitting him to hold a benefice, notwithstanding his being a natural son, and in June 1546 he was made an acolyte in the cathedral church of Aberdeen, of which he was afterwards appointed a canon and prebendary.
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  • In 1558 he took orders and was appointed Official of Aberdeen, and inducted into the parsonage and prebend of Oyne.
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  • He returned in her train, and was appointed a privy councillor and professor of canon law in King's College, Aberdeen, and in 1565 one of the senators of the college of justice.
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  • In the same year he was elected F.R.S., and made lord rector of Aberdeen University.
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  • Graaff Reinet (10,083), Middleburg (6137), Cradock (7762), Aberdeen (2553), Steynsburg (2250) and Colesberg (2668) are more centrally situated, while in the east are Graham's Town (13,887), King William's Town (9506), Queenstown (9616), Molteno (2725), Burghersdorp (2894), Tarkastad (2270), Dordrecht (2052), Aliwal North (5566), the largest town on the banks of the Orange, and Somerset East (5216).
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  • See Aberdeen (disambiguation) for articles sharing the title Aberdeen.
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  • ABERDEEN, a royal burgh, city and county of a city, capital of Aberdeenshire, and chief seaport in the north of Scotland.
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  • Though Old Aberdeen, extending from the city suburbs to the southern banks of the Don, has a separate charter, privileges and history, the distinction between it and New Aberdeen can no longer be said to exist; and for parliamentary, municipal and other purposes, the two towns now form practically one community.
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  • Aberdeen's popular name of the "Granite City" is justified by the fact that the bulk of the town is built of granite, but to appreciate its more poetical designation of the "Silver City by the Sea," it should be seen after a heavy rainfall when its stately structures and countless houses gleam pure and white under the brilliant sunshine.
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  • Like most Scottish towns, Aberdeen is well equipped with churches, most of them of good design, but few of special interest.
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  • The see of Aberdeen was first founded at Mortlach in Banffshire by Malcolm II.
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  • transferred the bishopric to Old Aberdeen, and twenty years later the cathedral of St Machar, situated a few hundred yards from the Don, was begun.
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  • The cemeteries are St Peter's in Old Aberdeen, Trinity near the links, Nellfield at the junction of Great Western and Holburn Roads, and Allenvale, very tastefully laid out, adjoining Duthie Park.
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  • Aberdeen University consists of King's College in Old Aberdeen, founded by Bishop Elphinstone in 1494, and Marischal College, in Broad Street, founded in 1593 by George Keith, 5th earl Marischal, which were incorporated in 1860.
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  • The buildings of both colleges are the glories of Aberdeen.
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  • Aberdeen and Glasgow Universities combine to return one member to Parliament.
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  • of Aberdeen, is St Mary's Roman Catholic College for the training of young men intended for the priesthood.
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  • - A defective harbour, with a shallow sand and gravel bar at its entrance, long retarded the trade of Aberdeen, but under various acts since 1773 it was greatly deepened.
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  • Owing to the variety and importance of its chief industries Aberdeen is one of the most prosperous cities in Scotland.
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  • Very durable grey granite has been quarried near Aberdeen for more than 300 years, and blocked and dressed paving "setts," kerb and building stones, and monumental 'and other ornamental work of granite have long been exported from the district to all parts of the world.
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  • The paper-making industry is one of the most famous and oldest in the city, paper having been first made in Aberdeen in 1694.
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  • Aberdeen was an important place as far back as the 12th century.
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  • It was burned by the English king, Edward III., in 1336, but it was soon rebuilt and extended, and called New Aberdeen.
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  • In 1715 the Earl Marischal proclaimed the Old Pretender at Aberdeen, and in 1745 the duke of Cumberland resided for a short time in the city before attacking the Young Pretender.
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  • of the Spalding Club; Cosmo Innes, Registrum Episcopatus Aberdonensis, Spalding Club; Walter Thom, The History of Aberdeen (1811); Robert Wilson, Historical Account and Delineation of Aberdeen (1822); William Kennedy, The Annals of Aberdeen (1818); Orem, Description of the Chanonry, Cathedral and King's College of Old Aberdeen, 1724-1725 (1830); Sir Andrew Leith Hay of Rannes, The Castellated Architecture of Aberdeen; Giles, Specimens of Old Castellated Houses of Aberdeen (1838); James Bryce, Lives of Eminent Men of Aberdeen (1841); J.
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  • Gordon, Description of Both Towns of Aberdeen (Spalding Club, 1842); Joseph Robertson, The Book of Bon-Accord (Aberdeen, 1839) W.
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  • Robbie, Aberdeen: its Traditions and History (Aberdeen, 18 93); C. G.
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  • Munro, Old Landmarks of Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1886); A.
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  • Munro, Memorials of the Aldermen, Provosts and Lord Provosts of Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1897); P. J.
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  • the marriages of these children; and Lord Aberdeen had virtually accepted the principle, which the French government had laid down, that a husband for the queen should be found among the descendants of Philip V., and that her sisters marriage to the duc de Montpensiera son of Louis Philippeshould aot be celebrated till the queen was married and had issue.
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  • His action broke up the entente cordiale which sad been established between Guizot and Lord Aberdeen.
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  • With this view she sent both for Lord Aberdeen, who had held the foreign office under Sir Robert, and tor Lord Lansdowne, who was the Nestor of the Whigs; and with Lord Lansdownes concurrence charged Lord Aberdeen with the task of forming a government.
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  • however, regarded that office as of material importance, and it was entrusted by Lord Aberdeen to an amiable and conscientious nobleman, the duke of Newcastle.
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  • The first session of the Aberdeen administration will be chiefly recollected for the remarkable budget which Gladstone brought forward.
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  • The Aberdeen ministry, however, thought it desirable that it should be represented in the crisis by a strong man at Constantinople; and it selected Lord Stratford de Redcliffe for the post, which he had filled in former years with marked ability.
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  • Its chief, Lord Aberdeen, was dominated by a desire to preserve peace; but he had not the requisite force to control the stronger men.
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  • He thought that he had a claim to the first place in the ministry, and he did not, in consequence, give the full support to Lord Aberdeen which the latter had a right to expect from him.
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  • His resignation was followed by the defeat of the government, and Lord Aberdeen, thus driven from power, was succeeded by Lord Palmerston.
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  • He had secured the support of the Peelites, who had left him after the fall of Lord Aberdeen in 1855, and of the free traders, who had done so much to defeat him in 1837 and 1858.
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  • The development of steam navigation since then had made Australia much more accessible than America was in 1837, and had brought New York, for all practical purposes, nearer to London than Aberdeen was at the commencement of the reign.
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  • It is also situated on the same company's main line to Aberdeen and sends off a branch to Brechin.
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  • The mismanagement of the war broke down the Aberdeen government in 1855, and then Disraeli had the mortification of seeing a fortunate chance of return to office lost by the timidity and distrust of his chief, Lord Derby - the distrust too clearly including the under-valuation of Disraeli himself.
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  • There are cathedrals at Perth, Inverness, Edinburgh and Cumbrae; the sees of Aberdeen, Brechin and Glasgow have no cathedrals.
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  • In 1784 Seabury, the first American bishop, was consecrated at Aberdeen.
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  • GEORGE CROOM ROBERTSON (1842-1892), Scottish philosopher, was born at Aberdeen on the 10th of March 1842.
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  • In the same year he returned to Aberdeen and helped Alexander Bain with the revision of some of his books.
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  • He had been intended for the Presbyterian ministry, but, after passing through Marischal College, Aberdeen, and teaching for a few years, he took orders in the Episcopal Church, and was appointed to the charge of Longside in 1742.
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  • He died at the house of his son, John Skinner, bishop of Aberdeen, on the 16th of June 1807.
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  • George Gordon Aberdeen >>
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  • He soon found another constituency at Oxford, and upon the formation of Lord Aberdeen's coalition ministry became president of the Board of Trade, although debarred by the jealousy of his Whig colleagues from a seat in the cabinet.
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  • Gladstone became prime minister with Lord Aberdeen as lord-lieutenant and Mr John Morley as chief secretary.
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  • Mr Balfour resigned in December 1905 and was succeeded by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Lord Aberdeen becoming lord-lieutenant for the second time, with Mr James Bryce as chief secretary.
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  • Her work was acknowledged by the university of Aberdeen, which bestowed on her the degree of LL.D.
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  • The manufacture of cod-liver oil for pharmaceutical purposes is naturally somewhat limited, as Norway, Newfoundland, and latterly also Japan, are more favourably situated as regards the supply of fresh cod, but the technical liver oils (cod oil, shark-liver oil) are produced in very large quantities in Grimsby, Hull, Aberdeen, and latterly also on the west coasts of the United Kingdom.
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  • He entered the Congregational ministry and held pastorates at Bathgate, West Lothian and at Aberdeen.
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  • He was also given the degrees of doctor of divinity of Edinburgh and Yale, and doctor of laws of Aberdeen.
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  • He delivered the Muir lectures at Edinburgh University (1878-1882), the Gifford lectures at Aberdeen (1892-1894), the Lyman Beecher lectures at Yale (1891-1892), and the Haskell lectures in India (1898-1899).
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  • 1699) of Badifurrow, Aberdeenshire, and after receiving a good education, probably at the university of Aberdeen, became a Presbyterian minister.
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  • active in the campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, he sold Peace News on a street corner in Aberdeen.
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  • alumnusnally established in 1939 to help publish the Aberdeen University Review, the Association helps to keep alumni informed about the University.
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  • Aberdeen Football Club, known as the Dons, was formed in 1903 when the original club amalgamated with Victoria United and Orion.
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  • The diver was evacuated by air ambulance to Aberdeen.
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  • Posted on 17.08.06 at 17:00 duffman After all this time, we find that A.A. doesn't stand for Aberdeen Angus at all.
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  • cargo handled at Aberdeen Airport increased by almost 5% .
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  • Gina uttered: Adie, Aberdeen Quite a difficult one this as DH is a confirmed carnivore.
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  • championship qualifier against France in Aberdeen.
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  • Aberdeen Orpheus choir Choir, Aberdeenshire, Scotland A mixed-voice choir with a wide repertoire from Scottish folk songs to classical choral works.
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  • It follows a study by Aberdeen University which shows girls as young as 10 are being prescribed the contraceptive.
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  • He was assisted by two permanent deacons of the Aberdeen Diocese, the Revs.
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  • defenceou know that, Aberdeen Council are rushing through a sea defense project having done NO Environmental Impact Survey?
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  • B - and would be to the severe detriment of this important Conservation Area and the visual amenity of this part of Aberdeen.
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  • disembarking from the ferry from Lerwick in Aberdeen.
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  • educated at the universities of Aberdeen, where he studied modern languages, and London.
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  • We came to Aberdeen at half an hour past eleven.
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  • Richard joins Whitburn from Bon Accord Band in Aberdeen, where he played principal euphonium for a number of years.
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  • evacuated by air ambulance to Aberdeen.
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  • gaol Aberdeen, the county jail was housed in an ancient, square tower.
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  • genealogical research at the Aberdeen Family History Shop.
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  • heritable proprietor of subjects at 11 Orchard Walk, Aberdeen (" the subjects " ).
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  • From 25th August to 30th October 1915 he was in the Scottish General Hospital, Aberdeen being treated for an inguinal hernia.
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  • Hot topics in molecular and cellular immunology: current research at the cutting edge in Aberdeen and beyond.
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  • impersonate anyone from the Aberdeen Journals Ltd or The Beehive with the intent to mislead others.
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  • Falsely impersonate anyone from the Aberdeen Journals Ltd or The Beehive with the intent to mislead others.
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  • inappropriate in the context of the Old Aberdeen conservation area.
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  • In a further question concerning cancer waiting time targets and proposed ward changes, at Aberdeen royal infirmary.
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  • Only Andy Booth (left) from Aberdeen, with a 2-1 win over Tim Miles of Worthing, prevented a landslide.
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  • ABERDEEN 19 Jul 2006 The roundabouts in Aberdeen are particularly lethal today, be safe Update - 19 Jul 2006 What!
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  • The best bait for me was fresh lugworm, whipped onto 1/0 Aberdeen patterns with shirring elastic.
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  • Gareth Hutchison and Kevin McLeish have been scoring freely and Berwick's sole setback was 3-0 at Aberdeen in the CIS Cup last midweek.
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  • Dr. Lisa Colton traveled up to the University of Aberdeen to give a paper at their research seminar, relating to 13th-century French motets.
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  • negotiable sep 14th 13 Paper Boys / girls Or Adults Aberdeen Journals Ltd Join a Winning Team.
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  • The massive public outcry in Britain was led by Roebuck, the MP for Sheffield and caused Aberdeen's downfall.
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  • Aberdeen Town Council had its own shameful record of witchcraft persecutions.
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  • pews in a church in Aberdeen.
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  • He also became a noted philanthropist and was particularly generous to McGill University in Montreal and Aberdeen University.
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  • I live in Aberdeen and wish to become a police officer how do I go about this?
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  • The rise of the Liberals in Aberdeen underlines the pitfalls of coalition politics at the level of the Parliament.
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  • The ecclesiastical affairs are directed by the presbytery of Alford and synod of Aberdeen; the Earl of Fife is patron.
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  • promontory on the south side of Aberdeen Bay, Where many a stout ship and crew have gone down passing that way.
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  • Aberdeen Journals Limited is the foremost newspaper publisher in the North of Scotland and employs over 550 staff in the local area.
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  • Scotland Under-21s are set to play the UEFA Under-21 Championship qualifier against France in Aberdeen.
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  • Support for the claims of the superior nutritional quality of organic milk has also been provided by an Aberdeen University study.
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  • r r ead the 60 second primer for a quick guide to the four aberdeen airport hotels with parking.
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  • recouped most of the outlay when Hughie Baird returned north of the border in October, joining Aberdeen in an £ 11,000 deal.
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  • regius chair of midwifery at the University of Aberdeen.
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  • The next scheduled sailing is due to leave Aberdeen at 19:00 on Tuesday 14th March sailing for Lerwick.
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  • Aberdeen, too, is showing signs of an increasingly vibrant arts scene.
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  • Aberdeen boasts six shopping malls and plenty of specialty outlets.
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  • sleazy harbor bars around Aberdeen!
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  • The team based at Aberdeen University has developed a method of making the drug soluble for the first time.
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  • sous chef from Aberdeen, is clear on the subject: " Only wild Scottish salmon will do it.
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  • The other bridge is upon the River Dee, about a mile west above New Aberdeen, and has seven very stately fine arches.
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  • Aberdeen tourism Award For outstanding efforts to promote tourism within their area.
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  • traveloguehD, I'm lucky because Aberdeen has original travelogs going back to the 1660s.
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  • For instance, a fourth-year undergraduate option is taught on ' Chinese Society ' at Aberdeen University.
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  • The general appearance of the Aberdeen style is quite widespread across England at the end of the twelfth century.
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  • From 1868 to 1873 he was in charge of a private observatory at Aberdeen, and from 1873-6 of Lord Crawford's observatory at Dunecht, organizing from there the expeditions to Mauritius to observe the transit of Venus in 1874 and to Ascension I.
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  • at Aberdeen, Monroe county, on the 13th of February 1899, and 107° F.
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  • See also McCosh, Scottish Philosophers (1875); Rait, Universities of Aberdeen, pp. 199-203, 223; A.
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  • The 6th earl, George (1841-1870), son of the 5th earl, was drowned at sea, and was succeeded by his brother John Campbell Gordon, 7th earl of Aberdeen (b.
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  • ALEXANDER ANDERSON (c. 1582-1620?), Scottish mathematician, was born at Aberdeen.
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  • Having made careful investigations, Gladstone, on the 7th of April 1851, addressed an open letter to Lord Aberdeen, bringing an elaborate, detailed and horrible indictment against the rulers of Naples, especially as regards the arrangements of their prisons and the treatment of persons confined in them for political offences.
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  • Bute filled the offices of ranger of Richmond Forest, governor of the Charterhouse, chancellor of Marischal College, Aberdeen (1761), trustee of the British Museum (1765), president of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (1780) and commissioner of Chelsea hospital.
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  • (See Basutoland: History.) There had been ministerial changes in England and the ministry then in power - that of Lord Aberdeen - adhered to the determination to withdraw from the Sovereignty.
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  • at Aberdeen in the northern part of the James River Valley to 25° at Rapid City, in the Black Hills district.
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  • Anderson of Aberdeen, in the supplement to his Apollonius Redivivus (Paris, 1612), but by far the best is by Robert Simson, Opera quaedam reliqua (Glasgow, 1776).
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  • From1571-1579Craig was in the north, whither he had been sent to "illuminate those dark places in Mar, Buchan and Aberdeen."
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  • The knights lost heavily, but Donald did not plunder Aberdeen (see Elspeth's ballad of Harlaw, in The Antiquary).
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  • Numerous protests were made by many of the inhabitants of the Orange River Sovereignty against the abandonment of it by the British government, but the duke of Newcastle, who was then colonial secretary in Lord Aberdeen's administration, replied that the decision was in- evitable (see [[Orange Free State]]).
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  • ==Charities== The Royal Infimary, in Woolmanhill, established in 1740, rebuilt in the Grecian style in 1833-1840, and largely extended after 1887 as a memorial of Queen Victoria's jubilee; the Royal Asylum, opened in 1800; the Female Orphan Asylum, in Albyn Place, founded in 1840; the Blind Asylum, in Huntly Street, established in 1843; the Royal Hospital for Sick Children; the Maternity Hospital, founded in 1823; the City Hospital for Infectious Diseases; the Deaf and Dumb Institution; Mitchell's Hospital in Old Aberdeen; the East and West Poorhouses, with lunatic wards; and hospitals devoted to specialized diseases, are amongst the most notable of the charitable institutions.
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  • EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, a Scottish church (see above) in communion with, but historically distinct from, the Church of England, and composed of seven dioceses: Aberdeen and Orkney; Argyll and the Isles; Brechin; Edinburgh; Glasgow and Galloway; Moray, Ross and Caithness; and St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane.
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  • An Edinburgh to Aberdeen push-pull train (above right) sets off across the Tay Bridge.
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  • Or r ead the 60 second primer for a quick guide to the four aberdeen airport hotels with parking.
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  • He recouped most of the outlay when Hughie Baird returned north of the border in October, joining Aberdeen in an £ 11,000 deal.
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  • In 1936, Baird was appointed to the regius chair of midwifery at the University of Aberdeen.
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  • At Aberdeen alone 250 requests for assistance have been dealt with in the February to June 2004 period.
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  • Last year 's winner was Aberdeen DARE hair salon owner John Cooper.
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  • Steve sanders Aberdeen I am very proud to use scots language.
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  • Currently playing with guitarist Alan Beattie in the sleazy harbor bars around Aberdeen !
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  • Hamish, a sous chef from Aberdeen, is clear on the subject: Only wild Scottish salmon will do it.
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  • Aberdeen Tourism Award For outstanding efforts to promote tourism within their area.
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  • For my PhD, I 'm lucky because Aberdeen has original travelogs going back to the 1660s.
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  • Noel Whelan had a tap-in to score the middle of Aberdeen 's three unanswered goals at home to Hibs.
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  • "SIR DAVID GILL (1843-1914), British astronomer, was born in Aberdeenshire June 12 18 4 3 and educated at the university of Aberdeen.
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  • GEORGE HAMILTON GORDON ABERDEEN, 4TH Earl Of (1784-1860), English statesman, was the eldest son of George Gordon, Lord Haddo, by his wife Charlotte, daughter of William Baird of Newbyth, Haddingtonshire, and grandson of George, 3rd earl of Aberdeen.
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  • See Lord Stanmore, The Earl of Aberdeen (London, 1893) C. C. F.
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  • Aberdeen >>
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  • Aberdeen and North of Scotland Agricultural College.
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  • from Aberdeen.
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  • After having been apprenticed to a linendraper, and for three years a clerk in a Dundee business house, he entered the Hoxton (Congregational) Theological College, and in 1804 was appointed to a Congregational chapel in Aberdeen.
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  • Earl of Aberdeen.
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  • In 1717 he was elected professor of mathematics in Marischal College, Aberdeen, as the result of a competitive examination.
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  • He studied at King's college, Aberdeen, where he graduated with distinction in 1849, thence proceeding to Cambridge, where he remained till 1855 without taking a degree.
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  • from the university of Aberdeen.
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  • He was an ardent Liberal in politics, and in 1880 he was elected to parliament for the Tower Hamlets division of London; in 1885 he was returned for South Aberdeen, where he was reelected on succeeding occasions.
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  • His first official appointment was that of under-secretary of state for foreign affairs, in the administration formed by Sir Robert Peel in 1841 - his chief being the earl of Aberdeen.
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  • He declined to accept office under the earl of Derby; but on the formation of the coalition ministry under the earl of Aberdeen in January 18J3, he received the appointment of postmaster-general.
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  • He went in 1780 to college at Aberdeen, where he made a friend of Robert Hall, afterwards the famous preacher.
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  • Communication with the islands is maintained by steamers from Leith and Aberdeen to Lerwick, the capital (twice a week), and to Scalloway, the former capital, and other points (once a week).
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  • Lord Aberdeen made no secret of his dislike for the Turks, and openly expressed his disbelief in the reality of their reforms; and in January 1853 the tsar, in conversation with Sir Hamilton Seymour, the British ambassador at St Petersburg, spoke of the Ottoman Empire as " the Sick Man," and renewed the proposals for a partition made in 1844.
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  • Lord Aberdeen still hoped to secure peace, and the Russian government was informed that no casus belli would arise so long as Russia abstained from passing the Danube or attacking a Black Sea port.
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  • ANDREW BAXTER (1686-1750), Scottish metaphysician, was born in Aberdeen and educated at King's College.
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  • Five years later, with unrestricted reciprocity relegated to the background, and with a platform which demanded tariff revision so adjusted as not to endanger established interests, and which opposed the federal measure designed to restore in Manitoba the separate or Roman Catholic schools which the provincial government had abolished, Laurier carried the country, and in July 1896 he was called by Lord Aberdeen, then governor-general, to form a government.
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  • There is a regular communication by steamer between Stromness and Kirkwall, and Thurso, Wick, Aberdeen and Leith, and also between Kirkwall and Lerwick and other points of the Shetlands.
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  • of Aberdeen by rail.
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  • The greatest of highland hosts met at Ardtornish castle, now a ruin on the sound of Mull: they marched inland and north, defeated the Mackays of Sutherland and were promised the plunder of Aberdeen.
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  • The good Bishop Elphinstone founded the university of Aberdeen in 1495; and in 1496 parliament decreed compulsory education, and Latin, for sons of barons and freeholders.
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  • He would restore the Mass in the North and welcome the queen at Aberdeen if she would land there, but Mary knew the worth of Huntly's word, and preferred such trust as might be ventured on the good faith of her brother.
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  • right, and (with at least a shadow of legal right) he proclaimed unlawful the assembly of Aberdeen (1605).
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  • SIR GEORGE REID (1841-), Scottish artist, was born in Aberdeen on the 31st of October 1841.
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  • He developed an early passion for drawing, which led to his being apprenticed in 1854 for seven years to Messrs Keith && Gibb, lithographers in Aberdeen.
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  • He returned to Aberdeen to paint landscapes and portraits for any trifling sum which his work could command.
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  • His first portrait to attract attention, from its fine quality, was that of George Macdonald, the poet and novelist, now the property of the university of Aberdeen.
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  • PETER TAYLOR FORSYTH (1848-), British Nonconformist divine, was born at Aberdeen in 1848.
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  • He took first-class honours in classics at Aberdeen, subsequently studied at Gottingen (under Ritschl) and at New College, Hampstead, and entered the Congregational ministry.
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  • Candida was written in 1894 for Mr Mansfield, who did not produce it until December 1903; but it was played in Aberdeen in July 1897 by the Independent Theatre Company.
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  • The university of Aberdeen conferred the LL.D.
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  • Thiers in France, and of Lord Aberdeen for Lord Palmerston in England, was a fortunate event for the peace of the world.
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  • Lord Aberdeen and M.
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  • Guizot and Lord Aberdeen.
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  • Indeed, he assured Lord Aberdeen, in 1853,.
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  • Upon the formation of the cabinet of 1853, which was composed by the junction of the surviving followers of Sir Robert Peel with the Whigs, under the earl of Aberdeen, Lord Palmerston accepted with the best possible grace the office of secretary of state for the home office, nor was he ever chargeable with the slightest attempt to undermine that Government.
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  • Upon the resignation of Lord Aberdeen and the duke of Newcastle, the general sentiment of the House of Commons and the country called Palmerston to the head of affairs, and he entered, on the 5th of February 1855, upon the high office, which he retained, with one short interval, to the day of his death.
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  • from Mintlaw station on the Great North of Scotland Railway Company's branch line from Aberdeen to Peterhead.
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  • When health failed him, he retired to Monte Pulciano, where from 1607 to 1611 he acted as bishop. In 1610 he published his De Potestate summiPontificis in rebus temporalibus directed against the posthumous work of William Barclay of Aberdeen, which denied the temporal power of the pope.
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  • WILLIAM ALEXANDER HUNTER (1844-1898), Scottish jurist and politician, was born in Aberdeen on the 8th of May 5844, and educated at Aberdeen grammar school and university.
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  • The area of the city extends to 6602 acres, the burghs of Old Aberdeen and Woodside, and the district of Torry (for parliamentary purposes in the constituency of Kincardineshire) to the south of the Dee, having been incorporated in 1891.
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  • Aberdeen is served by the Caledonian, Great North of Scotland and North British railways (occupying a commodious joint railway station), and there is regular communication by sea with London and the chief ports on the eastern coast of Great Britain and the northern shores of the Continent.
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  • Amongst the more conspicuous secular buildings in the street may be mentioned the Town and County Bank, the Music Hall, with sitting accommodation for 2000 persons, the Trinity Hall of the incorporated trades (originating in various years between 1398 and 1527, and having charitable funds for poor members, widows and orphans), containing some portraits by George Jamesone, a noteworthy set of carved oak chairs, dating from 1574, and the shields of the crafts with quaint inscriptions; the office of the Aberdeen Free Press, one of the most influential papers in the north of Scotland; the Palace Hotel; the office of the Northern Assurance Company, and the National Bank of Scotland.
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  • They are of four stories and contain the great hall with an open timber ceiling and oak-panelled walls; the Sheriff Court House; the Town Hall, with excellent portraits of Prince Albert (Prince Consort), the 4th earl of Aberdeen, the various lord provosts and other distinguished citizens.
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  • in 1906, form one of the most splendid examples of modern architecture in Great Britain; the architect, Alexander Marshall Mackenzie, a native of Aberdeen, having adapted his material, white granite, to the design of a noble building with the originality of genius.
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  • Anderson, Charters, &c., illustrating the History of the Royal Burgh of Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1890); Selections from the Records of Marischal College (New Spalding Club, 1889, 1898-1899); J.
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  • Cadenhead, Sketch of the Territorial History of the Burgh of Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1876); W.
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  • Cadenhead, Guide to the City of Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1897); A.
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  • Smith, History and Antiquities of New and Old Aberdeen (Aberdeen, 1882).
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  • Aberdeen, South Dakota >>
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  • In 1766, when only eighteen, he was candidate for the chair of mathematics in Marischal College, Aberdeen, and, although he was unsuccessful, his claims were admitted to be high.
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  • In July of that year he went with other commissioners to Aberdeen in the vain attempt to induce the university and the presbytery of that city to subscribe the National Covenant, and in the following November sat in the general assembly at Glasgow which abolished episcopacy in Scotland.
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  • In 1640 he was chaplain to the Scottish army and then settled as minister at Aberdeen.
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  • In 1845 the boy, who had been a "herd" on the farm, went for six months to the grammar school at Aberdeen and was there prepared for a university bursary, which was sufficient to pay his fees, but no more.
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  • (Aberdeen), D.D.
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  • Edward pursued his triumphant march as far as Aberdeen and Elgin, without meeting further resistance.
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  • He kept up his campaign throughout the winter, reduced every fortress that held out, and carried his arms as far as Aberdeen and Elgin.
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  • The disputes with the United States were satisfactorily composed; and not only were the differences with France terminated, but a perfect understanding was formed between the two countries, under which Guizot, the prime minister of France, and Lord Aberdeen, the foreign minister of England, agreed to compromise all minor questions for the sake of securing the paramount object of peace.
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  • While agreeing to this compromise, Lord Aberdeen declared that he regarded the Spanish marriages as a Spanish, and not as a European question, and that, if it proved impossible to find a fuitable consort for the queen among the descendants of Philip V., Spain must be free to choose a prince for her throne elsewhere.
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  • Louis Philippe regarded this despatch as a departure rom the principle on which he had agreed with Lord Aberdeen, md at once hurried on the simultaneous marriages of the qUeen vith the French candidate, and of her sister with the duc de ~4ontpensier.
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