This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

abbot

abbot

abbot Sentence Examples

  • It was a different Howie Abbot who took the news.

    64
    20
  • After having spent forty years in a cave at the foot of mount Sinai, he became abbot of the monastery.

    34
    15
  • Abbot, though a layman, received the degree of S.

    22
    21
  • In August 1177 we know that he was abbot of the monastery of Corazzo, near Martirano.

    21
    20
  • In August 1177 we know that he was abbot of the monastery of Corazzo, near Martirano.

    21
    20
  • This stands on the site where, in 1618, the Protestants attempted to build a church, the forcible prevention of which by Abbot Wolfgang Solander was the immediate cause of the protest of the Bohemian estates and the "defenestration" of the ministers Martinic and Slavata, which opened the Thirty Years' War.

    11
    7
  • This stands on the site where, in 1618, the Protestants attempted to build a church, the forcible prevention of which by Abbot Wolfgang Solander was the immediate cause of the protest of the Bohemian estates and the "defenestration" of the ministers Martinic and Slavata, which opened the Thirty Years' War.

    11
    7
  • These materials were used by a continuator who wrote in the middle of the 15th century, and who is identified with Walter Bower,' abbot of the monastery of Inchcolm.

    11
    10
  • to Wibald, abbot of Stablo and Corvey.

    9
    6
  • While still young he became a monk, and studied grammar and theology first at Exeter, then at Nutcell near Winchester, under the abbot Winberht.

    9
    11
  • The abbot of Fecamp seems to have originally held a market.

    8
    3
  • The abbot of Fecamp seems to have originally held a market.

    8
    3
  • In 1520 Luther's De Captivitate Babylonica converted him into a zealous supporter of the Reformer's views, to which he won over the abbot among others.

    8
    5
  • The manor belonged at an early date to the abbot of Westminster.

    8
    6
  • The first known instance of a mitred abbot is Egelsinus of St Augustine's, Canterbury, who received the honour from Pope Alexander II.

    7
    5
  • The first known instance of a mitred abbot is Egelsinus of St Augustine's, Canterbury, who received the honour from Pope Alexander II.

    7
    5
  • He was then persuaded by Abbot Herluin to open a school in the xvi.

    5
    2
  • He was successively councillor of the parlement of Grenoble, secretary to the king, almoner to Marie de' Medici, abbot of Aulnay and finally, in 1606, bishop of Sees.

    5
    4
  • Having assumed the monastic habit in the monastery of Deerhurst, he pased thence to Bath, where he became an anchorite and ultimately abbot, distinguishing himself by his piety and the austerity of his life.

    5
    4
  • At the university of Greifswald he gained much distinction as a humanist, and in 1504 was appointed by the abbot of the Praemonstratensian monastery at Belbuck rector of the town school at Treptow.

    5
    4
  • On the separation of the offices of bishop and abbot in 1122, the abbot's fee was carved out of the bishop's manor, but did not include the town.

    5
    4
  • Barrows, Ezra Abbot (Cambridge, Mass., 1884).

    5
    4
  • The abbot seems to have held a market from very early times, and charters for the holding of markets and fairs were granted by various sovereigns from Edward I.

    5
    7
  • The abbot seems to have held a market from very early times, and charters for the holding of markets and fairs were granted by various sovereigns from Edward I.

    5
    7
  • It was later granted to the earls of Salisbury, who seem to have allowed it to fall into disrepair, for in 1315 and in 1319 the abbot of Sherborne was appointed to inquire into its condition.

    4
    3
  • ST GILES (GIL, GILLES), the name given to an abbot whose festival is celebrated on the 1st of September.

    4
    3
  • From the 14th century to the middle of the 16th, Ubertin of Casale (in his Arbor Vitae crucifixae), Bartholomew of Pisa (author of the Liber Conformitatum), the Calabrian hermit Telesphorus, John of La Rochetaillade, Seraphin of Fermo, Johannes Annius of Viterbo, Coelius Pannonius, and a host of other writers, repeated or complicated ad infinitum the exegesis of Abbot Joachim.

    4
    5
  • From the 14th century to the middle of the 16th, Ubertin of Casale (in his Arbor Vitae crucifixae), Bartholomew of Pisa (author of the Liber Conformitatum), the Calabrian hermit Telesphorus, John of La Rochetaillade, Seraphin of Fermo, Johannes Annius of Viterbo, Coelius Pannonius, and a host of other writers, repeated or complicated ad infinitum the exegesis of Abbot Joachim.

    4
    5
  • Although he was the father of two children by Charlemagne's daughter, Bertha, one of them named Nithard, we have no authentic account of his marriage, and from 790 he was abbot of St Riquier, where his brilliant rule gained for him later the renown of a saint.

    3
    2
  • In 1066 he became the first abbot of St Stephen's at Caen, a house which the duke had been enjoined to found as a penance for his disobedience to the Holy See.

    3
    2
  • Although he was the father of two children by Charlemagne's daughter, Bertha, one of them named Nithard, we have no authentic account of his marriage, and from 790 he was abbot of St Riquier, where his brilliant rule gained for him later the renown of a saint.

    3
    2
  • I was born in the territory of the said monastery, and at the age of seven I was, by the care of my relations, given to the reverend Abbot Benedict (Biscop), and afterwards to Ceolfrid, to 'be educated.

    3
    3
  • apart, they were intended to form a single monastery under a single abbot, and so Bede speaks of them in the passage given above.

    3
    4
  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.

    3
    4
  • George Abbot (Archbishop) >>

    3
    5
  • Gherardo, however, did not say, as has been supposed, that Joachim's books were the new gospel, but merely that the Calabrian abbot had supplied the key to Holy Writ, and that with the help of that intelligentia mystica it would be possible to extract from the Old and New Testaments the eternal meaning, the gospel according to the Spirit, a gospel which would never be written; as for this eternal sense, it had been entrusted to an order set apart, to the Franciscan order announced by Joachim, and in this order the ideal of the third age was realized.

    3
    5
  • George Abbot (Archbishop) >>

    3
    5
  • Gherardo, however, did not say, as has been supposed, that Joachim's books were the new gospel, but merely that the Calabrian abbot had supplied the key to Holy Writ, and that with the help of that intelligentia mystica it would be possible to extract from the Old and New Testaments the eternal meaning, the gospel according to the Spirit, a gospel which would never be written; as for this eternal sense, it had been entrusted to an order set apart, to the Franciscan order announced by Joachim, and in this order the ideal of the third age was realized.

    3
    5
  • EZRA ABBOT (1819-1884), American biblical scholar, was born at Jackson, Waldo county, Maine, on the 28th of April 1819.

    2
    2
  • Milo drew largely upon the Vita Herluini, composed by Gilbert Crispin, abbot of Westminster.

    2
    2
  • EZRA ABBOT (1819-1884), American biblical scholar, was born at Jackson, Waldo county, Maine, on the 28th of April 1819.

    2
    2
  • In my nineteenth year I was admitted to the diaconate, in my thirtieth to the priesthood, both by the hands of the most reverend Bishop John (of Hexham), and at the bidding of Abbot Ceolfrid.

    2
    3
  • JOACHIM OF FLORIS (c. 1145-1202), so named from the monastery of San Giovanni in Fiore, of which he was abbot, Italian mystic theologian, was born at Celico, near Cosenza, in Calabria.

    2
    3
  • JOACHIM OF FLORIS (c. 1145-1202), so named from the monastery of San Giovanni in Fiore, of which he was abbot, Italian mystic theologian, was born at Celico, near Cosenza, in Calabria.

    2
    3
  • Burton was evidently a mesne borough under the abbot, who held the court of the manor and received the profits of the borough according to the charter of Henry I.

    2
    4
  • At the head of the Roman Catholic hierarchy are the archbishops of Scutari (with three suffragans), Prizren and Durazzo; the mitred abbot of St Alexander is the spiritual chief of the Mirdites.

    2
    4
  • In the west end of the town is Pinkie House, formerly a seat of the abbot of Dunfermline, but transformed in 1613 by Lord Seton.

    2
    4
  • In the i 1 th century this new form of devotion was extolled by some of the most ardent reformers in the monastic houses of the west, such as Abbot Popon of Stavelot, St Dominic Loricatus (so called from his practice of wearing next his skin an iron lorica, or cuirass of thongs), and especially Cardinal Pietro Damiani.

    2
    4
  • (Pierre Roger), pope from the 7th of May 1342 to the 6th of December 1352, was born at Maumont in Limousin in 1291, the son of the wealthy lord of Rosieres, entered the Benedictine order as a boy, studied at Paris, and became successively prior of St Baudil, abbot of Fecamp, bishop of Arras, chancellor of France, archbishop of Sens and archbishop of Rouen.

    2
    4
  • Matthew edited anew the works of Abbot John de Cella and Roger of Wendover, which in their altered form constitute the first part of his most important work, the Chronica majora.

    2
    4
  • (c. 850-913), archbishop of Mainz, belonged to a Swabian family, and was probably educated at the monastery of Reichenau, of which be became abbot in 888.

    2
    4
  • This Hatto built the church of St George on the island of Reichenau, was generous to the see of Mainz and to the abbeys of Fulda and Reichenau, and was a patron of the chronicler Regino, abbot of Priim.

    2
    4
  • Armed with it he passed safely into heathen Germany and began a systematic crusade, baptizing, overturning idols, founding churches and monasteries, and calling from England a band of missionary helpers, monks and nuns, some of whom have become famous: St Lull, his successor in the see at Mainz; St Burchard, bishop of Wurzburg; St Gregory, abbot at Utrecht; Willibald, his biographer; St Lioba, St Walburge, St Thecla.

    2
    4
  • An extreme school, the Aktistetae or Gaianists (Gaianus was bishop of Alexandria c. 550) even held that from the moment the Logos assumed the body the latter was untreated, the human being transmuted into the divine nature; and the Adiaphorites went still further; denying, like Stephen Barsudaili, an Edessan abbot, all distinction of essence not even between the manhood and the Godhead in Christ, but between the divine and the human, and asserting that "all creatures are of the same essence with the Creator."

    2
    4
  • 1268), Benedictine abbot of Notre Dame de la Grasse (1224) and bishop of Marseilles (1229), twice visited the Holy Land (1239 and 1260), where he helped the Templars build the great castle of Safet.

    2
    4
  • It is to be supposed that Richard de Bury sometimes brought undue pressure to bear on the owners, for it is recorded that an abbot of St Albans bribed him to secure his influence for the house by four valuable books, and that de Bury, who procured certain coveted privileges for the monastery, bought from him thirty-two other books, for fifty pieces of silver, far less than their normal price.

    2
    5
  • He is said to have been a slave and to have been appointed king at the command of St Cuthbert, who appeared to Eadred the abbot of Carlisle in a dream.

    1
    3
  • On the 13th of April 1396 he obtained ratification of the parsonage of St Stephen's, Walbrook, presented on the 30th of March by the abbot of Colchester, no doubt through his brother Robert, who restored the church and increased its endowment.

    1
    3
  • in the second half of the 13th century, partly (so far as relates to the Cid) from the above, partly from contemporary Arabic histories, and partly from tradition; the Cronica del Cid, first published in 1512, by Juan de Velorado, abbot of the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, which is a compilation from the last, interlarded with new fictions due to the piety of the compiler; lastly, various Arabic manuscripts, some of contemporary date, which are examined and their claims weighed in the second volume of Professor Dozy's Recherches sur l'histoire politique et litteraire de l'Espagne pendant le moyen dge (Leiden, 1849).

    1
    3
  • sbot) is borne among the Syrians only by the patriarch, in all the other rites by all bishops, in the Greek 1 Among curious exceptions is the pastoral staff still carried by the Lutheran abbot of Lokkum.

    1
    3
  • He received his education in Nicaea at a monastery of which he later became the abbot, though not in orders.

    1
    3
  • He is said to have been a slave and to have been appointed king at the command of St Cuthbert, who appeared to Eadred the abbot of Carlisle in a dream.

    1
    3
  • in the second half of the 13th century, partly (so far as relates to the Cid) from the above, partly from contemporary Arabic histories, and partly from tradition; the Cronica del Cid, first published in 1512, by Juan de Velorado, abbot of the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, which is a compilation from the last, interlarded with new fictions due to the piety of the compiler; lastly, various Arabic manuscripts, some of contemporary date, which are examined and their claims weighed in the second volume of Professor Dozy's Recherches sur l'histoire politique et litteraire de l'Espagne pendant le moyen dge (Leiden, 1849).

    1
    3
  • A monastery existed here in the 8th century, of which St Aldhelm was abbot at the time of his being made bishop of Sherborne in A.D.

    1
    4
  • The former abbot's house at Seyney Park is a half-timbered building of the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • Robert Reid, who ruled from 1526 to 1540, was its greatest abbot.

    0
    0
  • In 978 Bishop Wulfsey introduced the stricter form of Benedictine rule into his cathedral of Sherborne, and became the first abbot.

    0
    0
  • In an appendix to the Bosworth Psalter, edited by Mr Edmund Bishop and Abbot Gasquet (1908), Mr Leslie A.

    0
    0
  • He was discovered there one day by Flavius, the king of the Goths, who built a monastery on the place, of which he was the first abbot.

    0
    0
  • This symbolism is expressed in the words used, at least since the 10th century, by the consecrator in delivering the pastoral staff at the consecration of a bishop and the benediction of an abbot.

    0
    0
  • Close by are the remains of St Mary's Priory, which comprise a large Perpendicular gatehouse, refectory, precinct wall, abbot's gate and still-house.

    0
    0
  • ROBERT OF TORIGNI (c. 1110-1186), medieval chronicler, was prior of Bee in 1149, and in 1154 became abbot of Mont St.

    0
    0
  • Charles Abbot Colchester >>

    0
    0
  • The Roman Catholic Church has 4 archbishops; Esztergom (Gran), Kalocsa, Eger (Erlau) and Zagrab (Agram), and 17 diocesan bishops; to the latter must be added the chief abbot of Pannonhalma, who likewise enjoys episcopal rights.

    0
    0
  • The regular clergy were if possible worse than the secular, with the exception of the Paulicians, the sole religious order which steadily resisted the general corruption, of whose abbot, the saintly Gregory, was the personal friend of Matthias.

    0
    0
  • Having become an Augustinian canon, he was appointed abbot of Cirencester in 1213.

    0
    0
  • SILVESTER II., pope from 999 till 1003, and previously famous, under his Christian name of Gerbert, first as a teacher and afterwards as archbishop successively of Reims and Ravenna, was an Aquitanian by birth, and was educated at the abbey of St Gerold in Aurillac. Here he seems to have had Gerald for his abbot and Raymond for his instructor, both of whom were among the most trusted correspondents of his later life.

    0
    0
  • Everywhere - at Rome, at Treves, at Moutier-en-Der, at Gerona in Spain, at Barcelona - he had friends or agents to procure him copies of the great Latin writers for Bobbio or Reims. To the abbot of Tours he writes that he is "labouring assiduously to form a library," and "throughout Italy, Germany and Lorraine (Belgica) is spending vast sums of money in the acquisition of MSS."

    0
    0
  • To these may be added a very short disquisition on the same subject addressed to Adalbold, and a similar one, on one of his own spheres, addressed to Constantine, abbot of Micy.

    0
    0
  • He became in 1005 the first abbot of Eynsham or Ensham, near Oxford, another foundation of ZEthelma r's.

    0
    0
  • The last mention of Alfric Abbot, probably the grammarian, is in a will dating from about 1020.

    0
    0
  • Mores made him abbot of St Augustine's at Dover, and finally archbishop of Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • Hamilton, Rolls Series, 1870, p. 406) suggested that he was abbot of Malmesbury and bishop of Crediton.

    0
    0
  • They had endowed it with the manor and hundred of Faversham; this grant caused many disputes between the abbot and men of Faversham concerning the abbot's jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • Faversham was probably a member of Dover from the earliest association of the Cinque Ports, certainly as early as Henry III., who in 1252 granted among other liberties of the Cinque Ports that the barons of Faversham should plead only in Shepway Court, but ten years later transferred certain pleas to the abbot's court.

    0
    0
  • In this reign also the abbot appointed the mayor, but from the reign of Edward I.

    0
    0
  • he was elected by the freemen and then installed by the abbot.

    0
    0
  • A mysterious conversion had been effected in him by an austere Cistercian abbot.

    0
    0
  • About 940 the manor is said to have been given to the abbey of Ely by Oswy and Leoflede; the abbot held it in 1086; and it became attached to the see of Ely with the other possessions of the monastery.

    0
    0
  • There are several portraits of Lord Hood by Abbot in the Guildhall and in the National Portrait Gallery.

    0
    0
  • Returning to Normandy he was presented to the king by Jacques of Matignon; after he had abjured Protestantism, being again presented by Philip Desportes, abbot of Tiron, as a young man without equal for knowledge and talent, he was appointed reader to the king.

    0
    0
  • At this time Eata was abbot there, and Boisel, who is mentioned as his instructor, prior, in which office Cuthbert succeeded him about 661, having previously spent some time at the monastery of Ripon with Eata.

    0
    0
  • He had two natural sons, known as the abbot of St Far and the abbot of St Albin.

    0
    0
  • The cross of Tuam, re-erected in modern times, bears inscriptions in memory of Turlogh O'Conor, king of Ireland, and O'Hoisin, successively (1128) abbot of St Jarlath's Abbey and archbishop (1152) of Tuam, when the see was raised.

    0
    0
  • In the nth century Desiderius, abbot of Monte Casino, sent to Constantinople for workers in mosaic.

    0
    0
  • This industry must have won some reputation, for in 758 the abbot of Jarrow appealed t3 the bishop of Mainz to send him a worker in glass.

    0
    0
  • It is recorded that in the 7th century the abbot of Wearmouth in England obtained artificers in glass from France; and there is a tradition that in the 11th century glass-workers migrated from Normandy and Brittany and set up works at Altare near Genoa.

    0
    0
  • In 675 Benedict Biscop, abbot of Wearmouth, was obliged to obtain glass-workers from France, and in 758 Cuthbert, abbot of Jarrow, appealed to the bishop of Mainz to send him artisans to manufacture " windows and vessels of glass, because the English were ignorant and helpless."

    0
    0
  • He found favour at the Frankish court, was made abbot of Fleury and of Saint-Aignan, and in 781 became bishop of Orleans.

    0
    0
  • Hilduin, abbot of St-Denis in the first half of the 9th century, identified Denis of Paris with Denis (Dionysius) the Areopagite (mentioned in Acts xviii.

    0
    0
  • Abbot, by Robert Gordon's gaugings of the Irrawaddy, and by Allen J.

    0
    0
  • The portcullis gate and a tower are all that remain of it; of the abbey which was at one time the finest in Wales, there still exist the external walls, with parts of the chapel, vaulted chapter-house, refectory and abbot's house.

    0
    0
  • It existed as a town as early as the 11th century, and in 1259 it was sold by the abbot of Fulda to the bishop of Minden, afterwards passing under the protection of the dukes of Brunswick.

    0
    0
  • He soon gained recognition as a learned and successful teacher, and the younger Adalhard, St Anskar the apostle of Sweden, Odo bishop of Beauvais and Warinus abbot of Corvei in Saxony may be mentioned among the more distinguished of his pupils.

    0
    0
  • Between 842 and 846 he was chosen abbot, but as a disciplinarian he was more energetic than successful, and about 851 he resigned the office.

    0
    0
  • On the other side, the great men coveted the wide estates of bishop and abbot, and were ready without persuasion to annex portions of them to their own on the easy terms of this tenure, not always indeed observed by the holder, or able to be enforced by the Church.

    0
    0
  • A knight might hold directly of the king, a count of a viscount, a bishop of an abbot, or the king himself of one of his own vassals, or even of a vassal's vassal, and in return his vassal's vassal might hold another fief directly of him.

    0
    0
  • He held a portion of a foreign sovereign, the emperor, and other portions of the duke of Burgundy, of two archbishops, of four bishops, and of the abbot of St Denis.

    0
    0
  • in November 1245 he visited the abbey of Cluny and was presented by the abbot with gifts, the value of which surprised even the papal officials.

    0
    0
  • Educated at Meung and at Angers, he entered the Benedictine abbey of Bourgueil, and in 1079 became abbot of this place, but his time was devoted to literary pursuits rather than to his official duties.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the monastery of Reichenau, near Constance, where he had for his teachers Tatto and Wettin, to whose visions he devotes one of his poems. Then he went on to Fulda, where he studied for some time under Hrabanus Maurus before returning to Reichenau, of which monastery he was made abbot in 838.

    0
    0
  • This last poem, like the two preceding ones written in hexameters, was composed at the command of "Father" Adalgisus, and based upon the prose narrative of Heto, abbot of .Reichenau from 806 to 822.

    0
    0
  • At the time he sent it to Grimald Walafrid had, as he himself tells us, hardly passed his eighteenth year, and he begs his correspondent to revise his verses, because, "as it is not lawful for a monk to hide anything from his abbot," he fears he may be beaten with deserved stripes.

    0
    0
  • Through the machinations of enemies he was again expelled from the royal presence; but shortly afterwards Edmund revoked the sentence and made him abbot of Glastonbury.

    0
    0
  • In 1530 he was elected abbot of the Augustinian monastery at Spoleto, and in 1533 prior of the convent of St Peter ad Aram at Naples.

    0
    0
  • He was a priest named KakuyU, but better known as the abbot of Toba, who lived in the 12th century.

    0
    0
  • Francois de Rochefort, abbot of St Mesmin, instructed Francis and his sister Marguerite in Latin and history; Louise herself taught them Italian and Spanish; and the library of the château at Amboise was well stocked with romances of the Round Table, which exalted the lad's imagination.

    0
    0
  • Through Jacques Colure (or Colin), abbot of St Ambrose in Bourges, he obtained a tutorship in the family of a secretary of state.

    0
    0
  • The latter were no doubt deliberately exaggerated, and yet a comparison between the head of Fox in Sayer's plate "Carlo Khan's triumphal entry into Leadenhall," and in Abbot's portrait, shows that the caricaturist did not depart from the original.

    0
    0
  • It was restored to use in 1882 by a French Benedictine community, the fine Perpendicular abbot's tower remaining, while other parts have been rebuilt on the original lines.

    0
    0
  • 1088, abbot of St Peter's, Regensburg), was an Irishman by birth, and called Moelbrigte, or servant of Bridget.

    0
    0
  • The first occurrence of the completed form is in a treatise (Scarapsus) of the Benedictine missionary Pirminius, abbot of Reichenau (c. A.D.

    0
    0
  • They tend in any case to prove that the Quicumque comes to us from the school of Lerins, of which Honoratus was the first abbot, and to which Caesarius also belonged.

    0
    0
  • Angilbert, abbot of St Riquier (c. 814), records that it was sung by his school in procession on rogation days.

    0
    0
  • In 1461 the abbot of Buckfastleigh obtained a Saturday market at Kingsbridge and a three-days' fair at the feast of St Margaret, both of which are still held.

    0
    0
  • The manor remained in possession of the abbot until the Dissolution, when it was granted to Sir William Petre.

    0
    0
  • This epoch was introduced in Italy in the 6th century, by Dionysius the Little, a Roman abbot, and began to be used in Gaul in the 8th, though it was not generally followed in that country till a century later.

    0
    0
  • Before long the school connected with the monastery became famous, and among its earlier scholars it numbered Sturm, abbot of Fulda, and Megingod, second bishop of Wiirzburg.

    0
    0
  • When Boniface found himself unable to continue the supervision of the society himself, he entrusted the office to Wigbert of Glastonbury, who thus became the first abbot of Fritzlar.

    0
    0
  • We cannot regard the appearance at Rome of the personage who related these marvels in presence of the pope as a mere popular fiction: it rests on two authorities apparently independent (one of them a letter from Odo of Reims, abbot of St Remy from 1118 to 1151), for their discrepancies show that one was not copied from the other, though in the principal facts they agree.

    0
    0
  • He became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, where he made the acquaintance of Anselm, at that time visiting England as abbot of Bec. The intimacy was renewed when Anselm became archbishop of Canterbury in 1093; thenceforward Eadmer was not only his disciple and follower, but his friend and director, being formally appointed to this position by Pope Urban II.

    0
    0
  • Patrick Hamilton became titular abbot in 1517, and after his martyrdom the abbey was added to the bishopric of Ross.

    0
    0
  • Jansen ended by attaching himself strongly to the latter party, and presently made a momentous friendship with a like-minded fellow-student, Du Vergier de Hauranne, afterwards abbot of Saint Cyran.

    0
    0
  • ST HILARION (c. 290-371), abbot, the first to introduce the monastic system into Palestine.

    0
    0
  • In 1072 he had presided over the great Kentish suit between the primate and Bishop Odo, and about the same time over those between the abbot of Ely and his despoilers, and between the bishop of Worcester and the abbot of Ely, and there is some reason to think that he acted as a Domesday commissioner (1086), and was placed about the same time in charge of Northumberland.

    0
    0
  • Hugh the Abbot succeeded him in the countship of Anjou as in most of his other duties, and on his death (886) it passed to Odo, the eldest son of Robert the Strong, who, on his accession to the throne of France (888), probably handed it over to his brother Robert.

    0
    0
  • Under the auspices of Charlemagne and Louis the Pious he initiated a scheme for federating into one great order, with himself as abbot general, all the monasteries of Charles's empire, and for enforcing throughout a rigid uniformity in observance.

    0
    0
  • Here it will suffice to say that the most distinctive features of the Cluny system were (1) a notable increase and prolongation of the church services, which came to take up the greater part of the working day; (2) a strongly centralized government, whereby the houses of the order in their hundreds were strictly subject to the abbot of Cluny.

    0
    0
  • established an international Benedictine College in Rome for theological studies, and conferred on its abbot the title of "Abbot Primate," with precedence among Black Monk abbots.

    0
    0
  • (who had made him cardinal-priest and abbot of Monte Cassino) he was chosen to succeed him.

    0
    0
  • In 1580, after ten years' successful defence of his position, Kenryo, the eleventh "abbot," was obliged to surrender; and in 1583 the victorious Hideyoshi made Osaka his capital.

    0
    0
  • Letronne inclines to identify him with Dicuil or Dichull, abbot of Pahlacht, born about 760.

    0
    0
  • ST MAXIMUS (c. 580-662), abbot of Chrysopolis, known as "the Confessor" from his orthodox zeal in the Monothelite (q.v.) controversy, or as "the monk," was born of noble parentage at Constantinople about the year 580.

    0
    0
  • Like the pax ecclesiae it found ardent champions in the regular clergy, especially in Odilo (962-1049), the fifth abbot of Cluny, and soon spread over all France.

    0
    0
  • In Rome he met again his former superior, the abbot of Pomposa, who seems to have repented of his conduct, and to have induced Guido to return to Pomposa; and here all authentic records of Guido's life cease.

    0
    0
  • He came of a free peasant stock, his father being amtmann of the village; his mother, Margaret Meili, was the sister of the abbot of Fischingen in Thurgau.

    0
    0
  • Owing to his intelligence and ability he was transferred, not later than 796, from Fulda to the palace of Charlemagne by abbot Baugulf; and he soon became very intimate with the king and his family, and undertook various important duties, one writer calling him domesticus palatii regalis.

    0
    0
  • bestowed on Einhard and his wife the domains of Michelstadt and Mulinheim in the Odenwald, and in the charter conveying these lands he is called simply Einhardus, but, in a document dated the 2nd of June of the same year, he is referred to as abbot.

    0
    0
  • His wife, who had been his constant helper, and whom he had not put away on becoming an abbot, died in 836, and after receiving a visit from the emperor, Einhard died on the 14th of March 840.

    0
    0
  • It was founded under the tolerant Archbishop George Abbot (1562-1633), and would have been content with toleration such as the French and Dutch churches in England enjoyed.

    0
    0
  • The manor, with a market and tolls, was among the possessions confirmed in 972 by King Edgar to the abbot of Peterborough, to whom it still belonged in 1086.

    0
    0
  • The abbot of Peterborough about the 13th century confirmed to his men of Oundle freedom from tallage, "saving to himself pleas of portmanmoot and all customs pertaining to the market," and they agreed to pay 8 marks, 12S.

    0
    0
  • Setting out shortly after Christmas, he had a meeting with abbot Hugo of Cluny at Besancon, where he was joined by the young monk Hildebrand, who afterwards became Pope Gregory VII.; arriving in pilgrim garb at Rome in the following February, he was received with much cordiality, and at his consecration assumed the name of Leo IX.

    0
    0
  • The first religious settlement in Surrey, a Benedictine abbey, was founded in 666 at Chertsey (Cerotesei, Certesey), the manor of which belonged to the abbot until 1539, since when it has been a possession of the crown.

    0
    0
  • The increase of copyhold under Abbot John de Rutherwyk led to discontent, the tenants in 1381 rising and burning the rolls.

    0
    0
  • Ferries over the Redewynd were subjects of royal grant in 1340 and 1399; the abbot built a new bridge over the Bourne in 1333, and wholly maintained the bridge over the Thames when it replaced the 14th century ferry.

    0
    0
  • After this period of formation his fame began to spread abroad, and the monks of a neighbouring monastery induced him to become their abbot; but their lives were irregular and dissolute, and on his trying to put down abuses they attempted to poison him.

    0
    0
  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).

    0
    0
  • The most remarkable chapters, in which St Benedict's wisdom stands out most conspicuously, are those on the abbot (2, 3, 2 7, 64) The abbot is to govern the monastery with full and unquestioned patriarchal authority; on important matters he must consult the whole community and hear what each one, even the youngest, thinks; on matters of less weight he should consult a few of the elder monks; but in either case the decision rests entirely with him, and all are to acquiesce.

    0
    0
  • A garrison and military governor subordinate to the abbot were also installed.

    0
    0
  • Entering the Cistercian cloister Bolbonne, and graduating doctor of theology at Paris, he became in 1311 abbot of Fontfroide, in 1317 bishop of Pamiers and in 1326 of Mirepoix.

    0
    0
  • After the Conquest the great ecclesiastical landholders claimed exemption from the jurisdiction of the shire, and in 1279 the abbot of Battle claimed to have his own coroner in the hundred of Wye.

    0
    0
  • Having finished the verse of the 34th Psalm where it is written, "They who seek the Lord shall want no manner of thing that is good," he said, "Here I must stop: - what follows let Baithen write"; indicating, as was believed, his wish that his cousin Baithen should succeed him as abbot.

    0
    0
  • The earliest biography was written by one of his successors, Cuminius, who became abbot of Iona in 657.

    0
    0
  • Much more important is the enlargement of that work by Adamnan, who became abbot of Iona in 679.

    0
    0
  • The Institutionum historiae ecclesiasticae libri appeared in 1726, and in the same year he was appointed by the duke of Brunswick abbot of Marienthal, to which dignity and emolument the abbacy of Michaelstein was added in the following year.

    0
    0
  • In 1257 a market was granted to the abbot of Crowland and in 1308 to John, earl of Brittany.

    0
    0
  • His disciple, Abbot Walaf rid Strabo of Reichenau (d.

    0
    0
  • A large number of the reformed monasteries attached themselves to the congregation of Cluny, thus assuring the influence of reformed monasticism upon the Church, and securing likewise its independence of the diocesan bishops, since the abbot of Cluny was subordinate of the pope alone.

    0
    0
  • ARNO, ARN or Aquila (c. 750-821), bishop and afterwards archbishop of Salzburg, entered the church at an early age, and after passing some time at Freising became abbot of Elnon, or St Amand as it was afterwards called, where he made the acquaintance of Alcuin.

    0
    0
  • Near it is the goats' whey cure establishment of Heinrichsbad, and the two castles of Rosenberg and Rosenburg, ruined in 1403 when the land rose against its lord, the abbot of St Gall.

    0
    0
  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

    0
    0
  • Abbot Gilles li Muisis, for instance, records how, at the Jubilee of 1300, all the Papal Penitentiaries were in doubt about it, and appealed to the Pope.

    0
    0
  • The chief abbot has the rank of a bishop, and is a member of the Upper House of the Hungarian parliament, while in spiritual matters he is subordinate immediately to the Roman curia.

    0
    0
  • Matthew of Vendome, abbot of St Denis, an old servant of Louis IX., acted as Philip's counsellor, so the chroniclers state, throughout the reign; but he is only a shadowy figure, and it is difficult to reconcile the statement that "everything was done according to his will" with the known facts.

    0
    0
  • Through the invitation of Charles the Great, he became associated with the revival of learning which marks the reign of that monarch, by presiding over the School of the Palace (782-790), and by exercising a healthy influence as abbot of St Martin's at Tours (796-804).

    0
    0
  • His pupil, Walafrid Strabo, the abbot of Reichenau (d.

    0
    0
  • One of the most prominent personages of the century was Gerbert of Aurillac, who, after teaching at Tours and Fleury, became abbot of Bobbio, archbishop of Reims, and ultimately pope under the name of Silvester II.

    0
    0
  • During the same half-century, iElfric, the abbot of Eynsham (d.

    0
    0
  • Learning flourished at Monte Cassino under the rule of the Abbot Desiderius (afterwards Pope Victor III.).

    0
    0
  • When used by St Benedict in the singular number it seems (according to the commentator Menard) to denote the abbot himself.

    0
    0
  • At a later date in the order of St Benedict the title was applied to the monk next in authority to the abbot, though this usage was not adopted technically until the r3th century.

    0
    0
  • The first prior acted as vicar in all matters in the absence of the abbot, and was generally charged with the details of the discipline of the monastery.

    0
    0
  • (From copy belonging to Robert de Bello, abbot of St Augustine's, Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • In the 1 1th century a similar task was undertaken by Lanfranc, archbishop of Canterbury (1069-1089); in the 12th century by Stephen Harding (1109), third abbot of Citeaux, and by Cardinal Nicolaus Maniacoria (1150), whose corrected Bible is preserved in the public library at Dijon.

    0
    0
  • Bengel, abbot of Alpirspach (a Lutheran community), published in 1734, at Tubingen, an edition of the New Testament which marks the beginning of a new era.

    0
    0
  • 1582), abbot of Bassefontaine, bishop of Vannes and afterwards of Limoges, fulfilled important diplomatic missions in Germany, Hungary, England, the Low Countries and Switzerland under Francis I.

    0
    0
  • iipxwv, a ruler, and µav5pa, a fold or monastery), a title in the Greek Church applied to a superior abbot, who has the supervision of several abbots and monasteries, or to the abbot of some specially great and important monastery, the title for an ordinary abbot being hegumenos.

    0
    0
  • He was abbot of Inchcolm (in the Firth of Forth) from 1418, was one of the commissioners for the collection of the ransom of James I., king of Scots, in 1423 and 1424, and in 1433 one of the embassy to Paris on the business of the marriage of the king's daughter to the dauphin.

    0
    0
  • the abbot was lord in full.

    0
    0
  • Dr George Abbot, dean of Winchester.

    0
    0
  • There is a tradition that on one occasion the abbot of Beverley, anxious to investigate the case for himself, visited Mother Shipton's cottage disguised, and that no sooner had he knocked than the old woman called out "Come in, Mr Abbot, for you are not so much disguised but the fox may be seen through the sheep's skin."

    0
    0
  • He then became abbot of Bardney, and, according to Eddius, recommended Wilfrid to Coenred on his return from Rome. !Ethelred died at Bardney in 716.

    0
    0
  • (Bernardo Paganelli), pope from the 15th of February 1145 to the 8th of July 1153, a native of Pisa, was abbot of the Cistercian monastery of St Anastasius at Rome when suddenly elected to succeed Lucius II.

    0
    0
  • (often separately entitled Descriptio Insularum Aquilonis; Adam's is the earliest extant reference to Vinland, c. 1070): we have also notices of Vinland in the Libellus Islandorum of Ari Frodi (c. 1120), the oldest Icelandic historian; in the Kristni Saga (repeated in Snorri Sturlason's Heimskringla); in Eyrbyggia Saga (c. 1250); in Gretti Saga (c. 1290); and in an Icelandic chorography of the 14th century, or earlier, partly derived from the famous traveller Abbot Nicolas of Thing-eyrar (j'1159).

    0
    0
  • His assumed memoir was printed for English readers in 1597 by William Ponsonby under the title of a Historie of the Great Emperor Tamerlan, drawn from the ancient monuments by Messire Jean du Bec, Abbot of Mortimer; and another version of the same book is to be found in the Histoire du Grand Tamerlan, by De Sainctyon, published at Amsterdam in 1678.

    0
    0
  • abba, father), a monastery, or conventual establishment, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess.

    0
    0
  • A priory only differed from an abbey in that the superior bore the name of prior instead of abbot.

    0
    0
  • Canterbury, Ely, Norwich, &c., where the archbishop or bishop occupied the abbot's place, the superior of the monastery being termed prior.

    0
    0
  • They were subject to an abbot, and observed a common rule.

    0
    0
  • at Rome, in which is placed the seat of the hegumenos or abbot.

    0
    0
  • The outer school, with its headmaster's house against the opposite wall of the church, stands outside the convent enclosure, in close proximity to the abbot's house, that he might have a constant eye over them.

    0
    0
  • The buildings devoted to hospitality are divided into three groups, - one for the reception of distinguished guests, another for monks visiting the monastery, a third for poor travellers and pilgrims. The first and third are placed to the right and left of the common entrance of the monastery, - the hospitium for distinguished guests being placed on the north side of the church, not far from the abbot's house; that for the poor on the south side next to the farm buildings.

    0
    0
  • Abbot's house.

    0
    0
  • The abbot's house formed a small courtyard at the west entrance, close to the inner gateway.

    0
    0
  • Considerable portions of this remain, including the abbot's parlour, celebrated as "the Jerusalem Chamber," his hall, now used for the Westminster King's Scholars, and the kitchen and butteries beyond.

    0
    0
  • goo, a reformed Benedictine abbey was founded by William, duke of Aquitaine and count of Auvergne, under Berno, abbot of Beaume.

    0
    0
  • Passage to abbot's house.

    0
    0
  • The abbot's residence (K), still partly standing, adjoined the entrance-gate.

    0
    0
  • Owing its real origin, as a distinct foundation of reformed Benedictines, in the year 1098, to Stephen Harding (a native of Dorsetshire, educated in the monastery of Sherborne), and deriving its name from Citeaux (Cistercium), a desolate and almost inaccessible forest solitude, on the borders of Champagne and Burgundy, the rapid growth and wide celebrity of the order are undoubtedly to be attributed to the enthusiastic piety of St Bernard, abbot of the first of the monastic colonies, subsequently sent forth in such quick succession by the first Cistercian houses, the far-famed abbey of Clairvaux (de Clara Valle), A.D.

    0
    0
  • Immediately on the right of entrance was the abbot's house (G), in close proximity to the guest-house (F).

    0
    0
  • Old abbot's lodg E.

    0
    0
  • Detached from the great mass of the monastic edifices was the original abbot's house (N),with its dining-hall (P).

    0
    0
  • However important the abbot's occupations might be, he at once hastened to receive him whom heaven had sent.

    0
    0
  • After a short prayer, the abbot committed the guest to the care of the brother hospitaller, whose duty it was to provide for his wants and conduct the beast on which he numerary monks.

    0
    0
  • P. Abbot's hall.

    0
    0
  • At H, also outside the monastic buildings proper, was the abbot's house, and annexed to it the guest-house.

    0
    0
  • These have been identified either with the hospitium or with the abbot's house, but they occupy the position in which the infirmary is more usually found.

    0
    0
  • We may also call attention to the greatly lengthened choir, commenced by Abbot John of York, 1203-1211, and carried on by his successor, terminating, like Durham Cathedral, in an eastern transept, the work of Abbot John of Kent, 1220-1247, and to the tower (D), added not long before the dissolution by Abbot Huby, 1494-1526, in a very unusual position at the northern end of the north transept.

    0
    0
  • The abbot's house, the largest and most remarkable example of this class of buildings in the kingdom, stands south to the east of the church and cloister, from which it is divided by the kitchen court (K), surrounded by the ordinary domestic offices.

    0
    0
  • Abbot's House >>

    0
    0
  • There were also three submanors, one given by the first Aubrey de Vere early in the 12th century to the Abbot of Abingdon, whence the present parish church is called St Mary Abbots; while in another, Knotting Barnes, the origin of the name Notting Hill is found.

    0
    0
  • Maildulphus, a Scottish or Irish monk, who came into England about 635, built a hermitage near the site of the modern Malmesbury (Maildulphi-urbs, Maldelmesburh, Malmesbiri) and gathered disciples round him, thus forming the nucleus of the later abbey of which Aldhelm his pupil became the first abbot.

    0
    0
  • GUILLAUME D ESTOUTEVILLE' (1403-1483), French ecclesiastic, was bishop of Angers, of Digne, of Porto and Santa Rufina, of Ostia and Velletri, archbishop of Rouen, prior of Saint Martin des Champs, abbot of Mont St Michel, of St Ouen at Rouen, and of Montebourg.

    0
    0
  • At the age of fourteen he received the Benedictine habit in the monastery of Liessies in Hainaut, of which he became abbot in 1530.

    0
    0
  • The " coenobian " monasteries (Kow60ea), each under the rule of an abbot (iiyouµEvos), are subjected to severe discipline; the brethren are clothed alike, take their meals (usually limited to bread and vegetables) in the refectory, and possess no private property.

    0
    0
  • The great monastery of Rossikon, which is said to number about 3000 inmates, has been under a Russian abbot since 1875; it is regarded as one of the principal centres of the Russian politico-religious propaganda in the Levant.

    0
    0
  • In 1800 he became a member of the Academy of the Catholic Religion, founded by Pius VII., to which he contributed a number of memoirs on theological and philosophical questions and in 1805 was made abbot of San Gregorio on the Caelian Hill.

    0
    0
  • JOHN FECKENHAM (c. 1515-1584), English ecclesiastic, last abbot of Westminster, was born at Feckenham, Worcestershire, of ancestors who, by their wills, seem to have been substantial yeomen.

    0
    0
  • A certain king, Alchfrith, is said to have given the site of the town to Eata, abbot of Melrose, to found a monastery, but before it was completed Eata was deposed for refusing to celebrate Easter according to the Roman usage, and St Wilfrid was appointed the first abbot.

    0
    0
  • It was under his conduct that Theodore of Tarsus came from Rome to Canterbury in 669, and in the same year Benedict was appointed abbot of St Peter's, Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • Thereupon he was given in charge to the abbot of Westminster, and, persisting in his refusal, was four days afterwards committed to the Tower.

    0
    0
  • Upon St Serf's, the largest, which commemorates the patron saint of Fifeshire, are the ruins of the Priory of Portmoak - so named from St Moak, the first abbot - the oldest Culdee establishment in Scotland.

    0
    0
  • On an isolated hill close by stand the extensive ruins of the castle of Starkenburg, built by the abbot, Ulrich von Lorsch, about 1064 and destroyed during the Seven Years' War, and another hill, the Landberg, was a place of assembly in the middle ages.

    0
    0
  • Besides editing the works of John Donne, he published several volumes of his own verse, The School of the Heart (1835), The Abbot of Muchelnaye (1841), and a number of hymns, the best-known of which are "Forward!

    0
    0
  • Gregory himself, in his last moments, seems to have felt that it was impossible to maintain them, for Didier, abbot of Monteregularly enthroned on the 24th of the same month.

    0
    0
  • the papal state was surrounded on every side by German soldiers, and but for the premature death of the emperor, whom Abbot Joachim of Floris called the " hammer of the world," the temporal power of the popes might perhaps have been annihilated.

    0
    0
  • deputing a cardinal to Monte Cassino to elect an abbot of his choosing.

    0
    0
  • More important was the appointment in 1907 of a commission, under the presidency of Abbot Gasquet, to attempt the restoration of the pure text of the Vulgate as St Jerome wrote it.

    0
    0
  • ABBOT'S HOUSE.

    0
    0
  • Abbot's hall.

    0
    0
  • P. Abbot's gateway.

    0
    0
  • gave permission to Fulrad, abbot of St Denis, to be assisted by six deacons at mass, and these are empowered to wear "the robe of honour of the dalmatic."

    0
    0
  • About the year 1337 this hesychasm, which is obviously related to certain well-known forms of Oriental mysticism, attracted the attention of the learned and versatile Barlaam, a Calabrian monk, who at that time held the office of abbot in the Basilian monastery of St Saviour's in Constantinople, and who had visited the fraternities of Mount Athos on a tour of inspection.

    0
    0
  • Building began in earnest about 1135, and was continued steadily until the middle of the 13th century, after which the only important erection was Abbot Huby's tower (c. 1 500).

    0
    0
  • Adalberon wrote a satirical poem in the form of a dialogue dedicated to Robert, king of France, in which he showed his dislike of Odilo, abbot of Cluny, and his followers, and his objection to persons of humble birth being made bishops.

    0
    0
  • In 1196 the abbot granted the vill of Ulverstone with the inhabitants to Gilbert Fitz-Reinfred, who granted it a charter by which he raised it to the rank of a free borough.

    0
    0
  • The second half of the 8th century seems to have been a time of very general decadence; but about the year Boo Theodore, destined to be the only other creative name in Greek monachism, became abbot of the monastery of the Studium in Constantinople.

    0
    0
  • Before it was known that the chronicle ascribed to Ingulf of Croyland is really a fiction of the 13th or 14th century, the knighting of Heward or Hereward by Brand, abbot of Burgh 1 Comparative Politics, p. 74.

    0
    0
  • (Guillaume Grimoard or Grimaud de Beauvoir), pope from the 28th of October 1362 to the 19th of December 1 3 70, was born in 1309 near Lozere in Languedoc, and entered the Benedictine priory of Chiriac. After receiving orders he became successively professor of canon law at Avignon and Montpellier, vicar-general of the dioceses of Clermont and Uzes, abbot of St Germain d'Auxerre, abbot of St Victor at Marseilles,.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →