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abbey

abbey

abbey Sentence Examples

  • In England there was once a famous abbey, called Whitby.

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  • It has been noticed at Woburn Abbey that the antlers are shed and replaced twice a year.

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  • On Inishmore are remains of the abbey of Killenda.

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  • Rottum was once the property of the ancient abbey at Rottum, 8 m.

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  • In those far-off days, an abbey was half church, half castle.

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  • He soon became prior of the abbey of Anchin, near Pecquencourt, and passed much of his time in the valuable library of the abbey, studying ecclesiastical history, especially that of Flanders.

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  • All through the night he sat among the abbey cows, and sang his wonderful song.

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  • The abbey buildings of Clairvaux are the type of the Cistercian abbey.

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  • It was for this reason that I left my fellows in the abbey kitchen and came here to be alone.

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  • The foundation of the abbey of St Maurice (Agaunum) in the Valais is usually ascribed to Sigismund of Burgundy (515).

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  • Woolwich (Wulewich) is mentioned in a grant of land by King Edward in 964 to the abbey of St Peter at Ghent.

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  • Sorau is said to have existed in 840, and to have belonged to the abbey of Fulda till the 12th century.

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  • The foundation was erected into an abbey in 1399, and Abbey Road recalls its site.

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  • These include portions of an Augustinian abbey, founded by St Cronan, early in the 7th century, which are incorporated into the church.

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  • Of a Benedictine abbey there remain a beautiful Perpendicular gateway, and ruins of buildings called the prior's house, mainly Early English, and the guest house, with other fragments.

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  • THOMAS WYKES, English chronicler, was a canon regular of Oseney Abbey, near Oxford.

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  • The name of Mannheim was connected with its present site in the 8th century, when a small village belonging to the abbey of Lorsch lay in the marshy district between the Neckar and the Rhine.

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  • Out of this abbey a diocese grew, to be united with that of Killaloe in the 12th century.

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  • And one ran quickly and told the good abbess, or mistress of the abbey, what strange thing had happened.

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  • And Caedmon, the poor cowherd of the abbey, was the first great poet of England.

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  • Thus Westminster Abbey is sometimes styled the British "Pantheon," and the rotunda in the Escorial where the kings of Spain are buried also bears the name.

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  • Originally a village built for the accommodation of pilgrims to Melrose Abbey (4 m.

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  • from Enniskillen (q.v.), with its ruined abbey, round tower and cross.

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  • In the modern church of St Stephen (1854) are preserved tiles from the former Cistercian abbey of Bordesley, founded in 1138, of which the site may be traced at Bordesley Park, 2 m.

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  • According to local tradition he was buried at Cefn-y-bedd ("the ridge of the grave") close by, but it is more likely that his headless trunk was taken to Abbey Cwmhir.

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  • It was no doubt because of this that, three days before the Yorkist attack at Northampton, he delivered the great seal to the king in his tent near Delapre abbey, a nunnery by Northampton, on the 7th of July 1460 (Rot.

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  • William founded and richly endowed the abbey at Arbroath, and many of the Scottish towns owe their origin to his charters.

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  • One cold night in winter the serving men of the abbey were gathered in the great kitchen.

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  • The mineral springs, which belong to the adjoining abbey of Tepl, are eight in number, and are used both for bathing and drinking, except the Marienquelle, which is used only for bathing.

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  • On the 20th of March 1413, whilst praying in Westminster Abbey he was seized with a fainting fit, and died that same evening in the Jerusalem Chamber.

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  • in Westminster Abbey, the public funeral taking place on the 23rd of November, with great ceremony and on the same scale as that of Philip II.

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  • His favourite residences were Endegeest, Egmond op den Hoef and Egmond the Abbey (west of Zaandam).

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  • are the codex aureus, a copy of the gospels presented to the abbey of St Maximin by Ada, a reputed sister of Charlemagne, and the codex Egberti of the 10th century.

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  • The western towers of Westminster Abbey are usually attributed to Wren, but they were not carried out till 1735-1745, many years after Wren's death, and there is no reason to think that his design was used.

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  • St Rambert, in the arrondissement of Belley, besides being of industrial importance for its manufactures of silk and paper, possesses the remains of a Benedictine abbey, powerful in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries.

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  • Abingdon (Abbedun, Abendun) was famous for its abbey, which was of great wealth and importance, and is believed to have been founded in A.D.

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  • Abundant charters from early Saxon monarchs are extant confirming various laws and privileges to the abbey, and the earliest of these, from King Ceadwalla, was granted before A.D.

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  • The present parish church belonged to an abbey founded in 837 by St Bernard, bishop of Vienne.

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  • The place suffered greatly from the earthquake of 1638, which also destroyed the Benedictine abbey of S Eufemia, founded by Robert Guiscard.

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  • "Vedderburn's" Complainte of Scotlande (1549) has been variously assigned to Robert Wedderburn, to Sir David Lyndsay and to Sir James Inglis, who was chaplain of the Abbey of Cambuskenneth from about 1508 to 1550.

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  • He died on the 6th of December 1352, and was buried in the Benedictine abbey at Auvergne, but his tomb was destroyed by Calvinists in 1562.

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  • At Marseilles (after 410) he founded two religious societies - a convent for nuns, and the abbey of St Victor, which during his time is said to have contained 5000 inmates.

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  • All around him were the cows of the abbey, some chewing their cuds, and others like their master quietly sleeping.

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  • Of a Benedictine abbey dedicated to the same saints there remain a gatehouse and lodge, and a fine doorway.

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  • In 1002 Wulfric, earl of Mercia, founded here a Benedictine abbey, and by charter of 1004 granted to it the town with other large endowments.

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  • Although the abbey ale was mentioned as early as 1295, the brewing industry is comparatively of recent development, having begun about 1708.

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  • Many Anglican bishops (amongst them the archbishop of York and most of his suffragans) felt so doubtful as to the wisdom of such an assembly that they refused to attend it, and Dean Stanley declined to allow Westminster Abbey to be used for the closing service, giving as his reasons the partial character of the assembly, uncertainty as to the effect of its measures and "the presence of prelates not belonging to our Church."

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  • The church of St Mary and St German belonged to a Benedictine abbey founded under a grant from William the Conqueror in 1069 and raised to the dignity of a mitred abbey by Pope Alexander II.

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  • The university pulpit, indeed, was closed to him, but several congregations in London delighted in his sermons, and from 1866 until the year of his death he preached annually in Westminster Abbey, where Stanley had become dean in 1863.

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  • In the 9th and beginning of the 10th centuries the town was repeatedly plundered by the Danes, and in 978 the town and abbey were burned by the men of Ossory.

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  • Educated at the neighbouring Benedictine abbey of Cerne and at Balliol College, Oxford, he graduated in law, and followed that profession in the ecclesiastical courts in London, where he attracted the notice of Archbishop Bourchier.

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  • As an ecclesiastic Morton followed orthodox Lancastrian lines: in 1489 he obtained a papal bull enabling him to visit and reform the monasteries, and he proceeded with some vigour against the abuses in the abbey of St Albans.

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  • An early form of the name is Patricsey or Peter's Island; the manor at the time of the Domesday survey, and until the suppression of the monasteries, belonging to the abbey of St Peter, Westminster.

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  • It owes its name either to its early paper and grist mills (Milton being abbreviated from Milltown) or to Milton Abbey, Dorset, whence members of the Tucker family came, it is supposed, to Milton about 1662.

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  • Oak was thus applied at a very early date; the shrine of Edward the Confessor, still existing in the abbey at Westminster, sound after the lapse of Boo years, is of dark-coloured oak-wood.

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  • in the same direction lies the old and wealthy abbey of Tepl, founded in 1193.

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  • They appear in a document dating from 1341, where they are called "the Auschowitzer springs belonging to the abbey of Tepl;" but it was only through the efforts of Dr Josef Nehr, the doctor of the abbey, who from 1779 until his death in 1820 worked hard to demonstrate the curative properties of the springs, that the waters began to be used for medicinal purposes.

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  • According to various legends Cromwell's last burial place is stated to be Westminster Abbey, Naseby Field or Newburgh Abbey; but there appears to be no evidence to support them, or to create any reasonable doubt that the great Protector's dust lies now where it was buried, in the neighbourhood of the present Connaught Square.

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  • In the reign of Alfred the abbey was destroyed by the Danes, but it was restored by Edred, and an imposing list of possessions in the Domesday survey evidences recovered prosperity.

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  • In 1509 he was ordained priest and became a vicar in the collegiate Marienkirche at Treptow; in 1517 he was appointed lecturer on the Bible and Church Fathers at the abbey school at Belbuck.

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  • are some ruins of the ancient abbey of St Bavon and of a 12th-century octagonal chapel dedicated to St Macharius.

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  • It stands in relation to Danish history somewhat as Westminster Abbey does to English, containing the tombs of most of the Danish kings from Harold I.

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  • by bringing about the marriage of his pupil with Mademoiselle de Blois, a natural but legitimated daughter of the king; and for this service he was rewarded with the gift of the abbey of St Just in Picardy.

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  • One of the recommendations of Egmond the Abbey was the free exercise there allowed to the Catholic religion.

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  • The ruined church at Longpont (13th century) is the relic of an important Cistercian abbey; Urcel and Mont-Notre-Dame have fine churches, the first entirely in the Romanesque style, the second dating from the 12th and 13th centuries, to which period the church at Braisne also belongs.

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  • At Premontre the buildings of the abbey, which was the cradle of the Premonstratensian order, are occupied by a lunatic asylum.

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  • It is, however, with the Benedictine abbey of Bury St Edmunds that he is chiefly associated.

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  • The early abbey was probably destroyed by the Danes in the reign of i z Ethelred the Unready (978-1015), for in 1043 Edward the Confessor founded here a college of secular canons.

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  • A defrocked priest conspiring to blow up the local abbey.

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  • Bolton Abbey >>

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  • The date of the original chapel is unknown, but it was probably an oratory which was an offshoot of Kirkstall Abbey.

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  • Tradition indicates Selby as the birth-place of Henry I., and thus accounts for the high privileges conferred upon the abbey.

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  • William the Conqueror in 1084 celebrated Easter at Abingdon, and left his son, afterwards Henry I., to be educated at the abbey.

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  • Subsequently, on the 23rd of May, their marriage was declared valid and that with Catherine null, and in June Anne was crowned with great state in Westminster Abbey.

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  • On the 10th of March 1751 the prince died in London, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Kinloss Abbey, now in ruins, stands some 22 m.

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  • stayed in the abbey for a short time in 1303 and Queen Mary spent two nights in it in 1562.

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  • To the 12th century belongs the ruined abbey of S.

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  • The abbey church of St Mary the Virgin is a stately cruciform building with central tower, the nave and choir having aisles and clerestory.

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  • The parish church of All Hallows adjoined the abbey church on the west, but was taken down after the Dissolution, when the abbey church was sold to the parish.

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  • Portions of the abbey buildings, including the Lady chapel of the church, now converted into a dwelling-house, are incoporated in those of Sherborne grammar school, founded (although a school existed previously) by Edward VI.

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  • The abbey church was partly burnt in 1437, in a riot due to the monks' refusal to recognize the town's chapel of All Hallowes as the parish church, though they had restricted their use of the abbey church for parochial purposes.

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  • The Reformation made no break in the continuity of the school, which had probably existed in the abbey since the 11th century.

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  • The buildings of the Benedictine abbey, founded in 1066, are now used as a prison.

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  • A mile south are the green mounds marking the site of the abbey of Saulseat, founded for Premonstratensian monks by Fergus, "king" of Galloway, early in the 12th century.

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  • In 1507 he took up his residence in the Benedictine Abbey of St Germain des Pres, near Paris; this was due to his connexion with the family of Brigonnet (one of whom was the superior), especially with William Brigonnet, cardinal bishop of St Malo (Meaux).

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  • A bust of him by Matthew Noble is in Westminster Abbey, and his portrait was painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence.

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  • Near the township of Burnham are slight Early English remains of an abbey founded in 1265.

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  • He was summoned to London, but died on his way at Leicester abbey on November 30, and was buried there on the following day.

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  • For himself he obtained, in addition to his archbishopric and lord chancellorship, the abbey of St Albans, reputed to be the richest in England, and the bishopric first of Bath and Wells, then of Durham, and finally that of Winchester.

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  • An interesting deposit of oolitic magnetic ore occurs in the Dogger (Inferior Oolite) of Rosedale Abbey, in Yorkshire; and a somewhat similar pisolitic ore, of Jurassic age, is known on the continent as chamoisite, having been named from Chamoison (or Chamoson) in the Valais, Switzerland.

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  • Of the three churches (two Evangelical and one Roman Catholic) the most remarkable is the abbey church (Klosterkirche), a late Gothic building dating from 1465-1496, the choir of which contains beautiful 15th century carved choir-stalls and a fine high altar with a triptych (1496).

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  • The Benedictine abbey, founded in 1095, was used after the Reformation as a school, and is now an Evangelical theological seminary.

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  • He died in November 1655 and was buried in Westminster Abbey, but his body was exhumed and maltreated at the Restoration.

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  • One of the most ancient towns in Thuringia, Saalfeld, once the capital of the extinct duchy of Saxe-Saalfeld, is still partly surrounded by old walls and bastions, and contains some interesting medieval buildings, among them being a palace,, built in 1679 on the site of the Benedictine abbey of St Peter, which was destroyed during the Peasants' War.

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  • Saalfeld grew up around the abbey founded in 1075 by Anno, archbishop of Cologne, and the palace built by the emperor Frederick I.

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  • Originally the abbey was a convent, founded in the 12th century, but converted two centuries later into a collegiate church by Archibald, earl of Douglas.

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  • Emboldened perhaps by the windfall of 1813, Bentham in the following year took a lease of Ford Abbey, a fine mansion with a deer-park, in Dorsetshire; but in 1818 returned to the house in Queen's Square Place which he had occupied since the death of his father in 1792.

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  • The village church of Beauchief Abbey, near Dronfield, is a remnant of an abbey founded c. 1175 by Robert Fitzranulf.

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  • Dale Abbey, near Derby, was founded early in the 13th century for the Premonstratensian order.

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  • The abbey church contained famous stained glass, and some of this is preserved in the neighbouring church at Morley.

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  • The Ladder has been translated into several foreign languages - into English by Father Robert, Mount St Bernard's Abbey, Leicestershire (1856).

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  • Facing the castle, on the western side of the pill, stand the considerable remains of Monkton Priory, a Benediction house founded by Earl William Marshal as a cell to the abbey of Seez or Sayes in Normandy, but under Henry VI.

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  • transferred to the abbey of St Albans.

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  • Further incursions made by the Danes in 998 and in 1015 under Canute probably resulted in the destruction of the priory, on the site of which a later house was founded in the 12th century as a cell of the Norman abbey of Lysa, and in the decayed condition of Wareham in 1086, when 203 houses were ruined or waste, the result of misfortune, poverty and fire.

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  • The manor of Ottery belonged to the abbey of Rouen in the time of Edward the Confessor.

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  • The manor of West Ham was settled upon Stratford-Langthorne Abbey, founded by William de Montfichet in 1135 for monks of the Cistercian order.

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  • The abbey stood in the marshes, on a branch of the Lea known as the Abbey Creek, about 2 m.

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  • Of this kind of retribution Scott in The Abbot gives a vivid picture, the Protestants interrupting the mass celebrated by the trembling remnant of the monks in the ruined abbey church, and insisting on substituting the traditional Feast of Fools.

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  • Slight remains are to be seen of an abbey of Canons Regular, founded in the middle of the 6th century by St Comgall, and rebuilt, on a scale of magnificence which astonished the Irish, by St Malachy O'Morgair in the first half of the 12th century.

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  • Abbey (on the quest of the Holy Grail).

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  • The Stundenthalshbhe, a popular resort, is in the neighbourhood, and near Gladbach is Altenberg, with a remarkably fine church, built for the Cistercian abbey at this place.

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  • They rode incessantly to battle over burning sands, in full armour 1 For instance, the abbey of Mount Sion had large possessions, not only in the Holy Land (at Ascalon, Jaffa, Acre, Tyre, Caesarea and Tarsus), but also in Sicily, Calabria, Lombardy, Spain and France (at Orleans, Bourges and Poitiers).

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  • Some of the buildings of the Benedictine abbey, to which this church belonged, remain.

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  • Among other places of interest are Rynsburg, the site of a convent for nobles founded in 1133 and destroyed in the time of Spanish rule; Voorschoten; Wassenaar, all of which were formerly minor lordships; Loosduinen, probably the Lugdunum of the Romans, and the seat of a Cistercian abbey destroyed in 1579; Naaldwyk, an ancient lordship; and 's Gravenzande, which possessed a palace of the counts of Holland in the 12th century, when it was a harbour on the Maas.

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  • At the same period he founded the abbey of Fulda, as a centre for German monastic culture, placing it under the Bavarian Sturm, whose biography gives us so many picturesque glimpses of the time, and making its rule stricter than the Benedictine.

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  • Though the precise locality is occasionally uncertain, the majority of the medieval synods assembled in the chapter-house of old St Paul's, or the former chapel of St Catherine within the precincts of Westminster Abbey or at Lambeth.

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  • on, many of the most vital changes in ecclesiastical discipline were adopted in convocations at St Paul's and in the Abbey.

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  • P. Stanley, Historical Memorials of Westminster Abbey (4th and revised ed., London, 1876), 4 11 -4 1 3, 495-504; H.

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  • Busby died in 1695, in his ninetieth year, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, where his effigy is still to be seen.

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  • As soon as Ignatius had regained strength, he started ostensibly to rejoin the duke of Nagera, but in reality to visit the great Benedictine abbey of Montserrato, a famous place of pilgrimage.

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  • Approaching the abbey he resolved to do as his favourite hero Amadis de Gaul did - keep a vigil all night before the Lady altar and then lay aside his worldly armour to put on that of Christ.

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  • He arrived at the abbey just about the feast of St Benedict (the 21st of March 1522), and there made a confession of his life to a priest belonging to the monastery.

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  • Leaving his mule to the abbey, and giving away his worldly clothes to a beggar, he kept his watch in the church during the night of the 24th-25th of March, and placed on the Lady altar his sword and dagger.

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  • The most important building is the abbey church of La Trinite, dating for the most part from 1175 to 1225.

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  • The hôtel-de-ville with a municipal museum and library occupy the remains of the abbey buildings (18th century).

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  • She was entrusted to the care of the earl of Linlithgow, and after the departure of the royal family to England, to the countess of Kildare, subsequently residing with Lord and Lady Harington at Combe Abbey in Warwickshire.

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  • On the 8th of February 1662 she removed to Leicester House in Leicester Fields, and died shortly afterwards on the 13th of the same month being buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • of the earl of Craven, at Combe Abbey.

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  • It has an imposing Benedictine abbey, once a castle, but converted into a religious house in 1322, when Ottakar I.

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  • Giessen, part of Schmalkalden, Ziegenhain, Nidda and, after a long struggle, Katzenelnbogen were acquired, while in 1432 the abbey of Hersfeld placed itself under the protection of Hesse.

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  • In 808 Charlemagne took the abbey of St-Gilles under his protection, and it is mentioned among the monasteries from which only prayers for the prince and the state were due.

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  • c. 1422), English chronicler, was probably educated at the abbey of St Albans and at Oxford.

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  • The Gesta is a history of the abbots of St Albans from the foundation of the abbey to 1381.

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  • At Bonneval the lunatic asylum occupies the r8th-century buildings of a former Benedictine abbey.

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  • The abbey church belonged to the 13th century, but only a gateway flanked by two massive towers is left.

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  • In the time of the Confessor Winchelsea (Winchenesel, Winchelese, Wynchelse) was included in Rameslie which was granted by him to the abbey of Fecamp. The town remained under the lordship of the abbey until it was resumed by Henry III.

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  • Having crossed to England with Henry, the queen was crowned in Westminster Abbey on the 23rd of February 1421, and in the following December gave birth to a son, afterwards King Henry VI.

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  • They lived in obscurity till 1436, when Tudor was imprisoned, and Catherine retired to Bermondsey Abbey, where she died on the 3rd of January 1437.

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  • Her body was buried in the Lady chapel of Westminster Abbey, and when the chapel was pulled down during the reign of Henry VII., was placed in Henry V.'s tomb.

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  • After seeing his comrades decimated by the plague at Constantinople he resolved to change his mode of life, and, on his return to Italy, after a rigorous pilgrimage and a period of ascetic retreat, became a monk in the Cistercian abbey of Casamari.

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  • He accordingly retired into the solitudes of Pietralata, and subsequently founded with some companions under a rule of his own creation the abbey of San Giovanni in Fiore, on Monte Nero, in the massif of La Sila.

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  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.

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  • The principal remains of the abbey (see Abbey) are the N.

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  • A considerable portion of the abbey was employed for the erection of the king's manor, a palace for the lord president of the north, now occupied as a school for the blind.

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  • During the 14th century there were constant quarrels between the citizens and the abbey of St Mary's about the suburb of Bootham, which the citizens claimed as within the jurisdiction of the city, and the abbey as a separate borough.

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  • In 1353 the king took the borough of York into his own hands, "to avoid any risk of disturbance and possible great bloodshed such as has arisen before these times," and finally in the same year an agreement was brought about by Archbishop Thoresby that the whole of Bootham should be considered a suburb of York except the street called St Marygate, which should be in the jurisdiction of the abbey.

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  • The abbey church of St Pierre, dating chiefly from the 1 3 th century, contains, besides some fine stained glass, twelve representations of the apostles in enamel, executed about 1 547 by Leonard Limosin.

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  • Abbey, The English Church in the 18th Century; and J.

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  • Ahmed Kuprili attacked the Austrians, at first with success, but was routed by Montecuculi at the battle of St Gotthard Abbey and eventually consented to the treaty of Vasvar (Aug.

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  • THE Funeral Of Edward The Confessor At Wes1 Minster Abbey.

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  • Five miles south-east of Tunbridge Wells is Bayham Abbey, founded in 1200, where ruins of a church, a gateway, and dependent buildings adjoin the modern Tudor mansion.

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  • His concluding years were passed at Spinney Abbey in Cambridgeshire; he was unmolested by the government, and he died on the 23rd of March 1674.

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  • Henry died near Gisors on the 1st of December, 1135, in the thirty-sixth year of his reign, and was buried in the abbey of Reading which he himself had founded.

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  • Brechin is a prosperous town, of great antiquity, having been the site of a Culdee abbey.

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  • When fourteen he drew sketches to illustrate a trip to the ruins of Newstead Abbey, which afterwards appeared on the title-page of Moore's Life of Lord Byron.

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  • 675 to Chertsey Abbey by the sub-king Frithwald.

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  • In 1666 he was appointed to the abbey church, Bath; in 1678 he became prebendary of Worcester Cathedral, and acted as chaplain in ordinary to Charles II.

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  • There are some remains of Tor or Torre Abbey, founded for Praemonstratensians by William, Lord Brewer, in 1196.

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  • On Chapel Hill are the remains of a chapel of the 12th century, dedicated to St Michael, and supposed to have formerly belonged to the abbey.

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  • There was a village at Torre even before the foundation of the abbey, and in the neighbourhood of Torre evidence has been found of Roman occupation.

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  • Hermann, who became a monk of the famous abbey of Reichenau, is at once one of the most attractive and one of the most pathetic figures of medieval monasticism.

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  • Skoon; Gaelic, skene, "a cutting"), a parish of Perthshire, Scotland, containing Old Scone, the site of an historic abbey and palace, and New Scone, a modern village (pop. 1585), 2 m.

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  • The abbey was founded in 1115 by Alexander I., but long before this date Scone had been a centre of ecclesiastical activity and the seat of a monastery.

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  • Kenneth is alleged to have brought the Stone of Destiny, on which the Celtic kings were crowned, from Dunstaffnage Castle on Loch Etive, and to have deposited it in Scone, whence it was conveyed to Westminster Abbey (where it lies beneath the Coronation Chair) by Edward I.

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  • Probably the ancient House of Scone, which stood near the abbey, provided the kings with temporary accommodation.

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  • Both the abbey and the house were burned down by the Reformers in 1559, and next year the estates were granted to the Ruthvens.

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  • Holyrood Palace was originally an abbey of canons regular of the rule of St Augustine, founded by David I.

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  • in 1128, and the ruined nave of the abbey church still shows parts of the original structure.

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  • The abbey suffered repeatedly in invasions.

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  • in the British Museum, the present north-west tower of the palace is shown standing apart, and only joined to the abbey by a low cloister.

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  • The royal vault in the Chapel Royal, which had fallen into a dilapidated condition, has been put in order; Clockmill House and grounds have been added to the area of the parade ground, and the abbey precincts generally and the approaches to the King's Park have been improved.

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  • founded the abbey of Holyrood (1128), which from an early date received the court as its guests.

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  • But notwithstanding the attractions of the abbey and the neighbouring chase, the royal palace continued for centuries to be within the fortress,.

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  • Hence, though the village of Canongate grew up beside the abbey of David I., and Edinburgh was a place of sufficient importance to be reckoned one of the four principal burghs as a judicatory for all commercial matters, nevertheless, even so late as 1450, when it became for the first time a walled town, it did not extend beyond the upper part of the ridge which slopes eastwards from the castle.

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  • was celebrated in Holyrood Abbey instead of at Scone, and the widowed queen took up her residence, with the young king, in the castle.

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  • The citizens hastened to construct a second line of wall, enclosing the Cowgate and the heights beyond, since occupied by Greyfriars churches and Heriot's hospital, but still excluding the Canongate, as pertaining to the abbey of Holyrood.

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  • The cathedral, one of the finest examples of Italian Gothic architecture, obviously influenced in plan by the abbey of S.

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  • The ruined Cistercian abbey of S.

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  • He endeavoured to attract to his court the best scholars of Britain and Ireland, and by imperial decree (787) commanded the establishment of schools in connexion with every abbey in his realms. Peter of Pisa and Alcuin of York were his advisers, and under their care the opposition long supposed to exist between godliness and secular learning speedily disappeared.

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  • The richest libraries in Hungary are the National Library at Budapest; the University Library, also at Budapest, and the library of the abbey of Pannonhalma.

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  • ANTE-CHOIR, the term given to the space enclosed in a church between the outer gate or railing of the rood screen and the door of the screen; sometimes there is only one rail, gate or door, but in Westminster Abbey it is equal in depth to one bay of the nave.

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  • The remains of Basingwerk Abbey (Maes glas, green field), partly Saxon and partly Early English, are near the station.

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  • On the other side of the river, connected by a bridge of the 14th century, and another of modern erection, stands the suburb of Carrickbeg, in county Waterford, where an abbey was founded in 1336.

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  • He was educated at St Albans Abbey school, and began to teach as schoolmaster of Dunstable, dependent on St Albans Abbey.

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  • SILVESTER II., pope from 999 till 1003, and previously famous, under his Christian name of Gerbert, first as a teacher and afterwards as archbishop successively of Reims and Ravenna, was an Aquitanian by birth, and was educated at the abbey of St Gerold in Aurillac. Here he seems to have had Gerald for his abbot and Raymond for his instructor, both of whom were among the most trusted correspondents of his later life.

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  • It must have been about this time that Gerbert received the great abbey of Bobbio from the emperor.

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  • He is also found confirming his old rival Arnulf in the see of Reims; summoning Adalbero or Azelmus of Laon to Rome to answer for his crimes; judging between the archbishop of Mainz and the bishop of Hildesheim; besieging the revolted town of Cesena; flinging the count of Angouleme into prison for an offence against a bishop; confirming the privileges of Fulda abbey; granting charters to bishoprics far away on the Spanish mark; and, on the eastern borders of the empire, erecting Prague as the seat of an archbishopric for the Sla y s.

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  • are those of the Barberini Library at Rome (late 16th century), of Middlehill (17th century), and of St Peter's abbey, Salzburg.

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  • The extensive buildings of the Cistercian abbey of Fontfroide, near Bizanet, include a Romanesque church, a cloister, dormitories and a refectory of the 12th century.

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  • A curious polygonal church of the i ith century at Rieux-Minervois, the abbey-church at St Papoul, with its graceful cloister of the 14th century, and the remains of the important abbey of St Hilaire, founded in the 6th century and rebuilt from the 12th to the 15th century, are also of antiquarian interest.

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  • ZEthelwold had carried on the tradition of Dunstan in his government of the abbey of Abingdon, and at Winchester he continued his strenuous efforts.

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  • IElfric no doubt gained some reputation as a scholar at Winchester, for when, in 987, the abbey of Cernel (Cerne Abbas, Dorsetshire) was finished, he was sent by Bishop iElfheah (Alphege), thelwold's successor, at the request of the chief benefactor of the abbey, the ealdorman IEthelmar, to teach the Benedictine monks there.

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  • chiefly spent at Winchester; but his writings for the patrons of Come!, and the fact that he wrote in 998 his Canons' as a pastoral letter for Wulfsige, the bishop of Sherborne, the diocese in which the abbey was situated, afford presumption of continued residence there.

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  • He was buried at the abbey he founded here, of which only a wall and the foundations below ground remain.

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  • An abbey was built by Stephen in 1147, in which he and Matilda were buried.

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  • Wroxton Abbey, 2 m.

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  • Aurillac owes its origin to an abbey founded in the 9th century by St Geraud, and the abbey-church, rebuilt in the 17th century in the Gothic style, is the chief building in the town.

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  • There is a statue of Pope Silvester II., born near Aurillac in 930 and educated in the abbey, which soon afterwards became one of the most famous schools of France.

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  • About 940 the manor is said to have been given to the abbey of Ely by Oswy and Leoflede; the abbot held it in 1086; and it became attached to the see of Ely with the other possessions of the monastery.

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  • Blanche died in 1326, still in confinement, though at the last in the abbey of MIaubuisson.

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  • The result was a difficulty as to burial, which was compromised by hurried interment at the abbey of Scellieres in Champagne, anticipating the interdict of the bishop of the diocese by an hour or two.

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  • Of the same character is the use of incense carried in a perfuming pan before the sovereign at his coronation in the procession from Westminster Hall to the Abbey.

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  • Continuing westward, the most important stream was Tyburn, which rose at Hampstead, and joined the Thames through branches on either side of Thorney Island, on which grew up the great ecclesiastical foundation of St Peter, Westminster, better known as Westminster Abbey.

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  • Hyde Park, to the west, belonged originally to the manor of Hyde, which was attached to Westminster Abbey, but was taken by Henry VIII.

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  • In the survey of London (1598) by John Stow, 125 churches, including St Paul's and Westminster Abbey, are named; of these 89 were destroyed by the great fire.

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  • Other ancient churches outside the City are few; but there may be noted St Margaret's, under the shadow of Westminster Abbey; and the beautiful Ely Chapel in Holborn (q.v.), the only remnant of a palace of the bishops of Ely, now used by the Roman Catholics.

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  • It is the scene from time to time of splendid ceremonies, and contains the tombs of many great men; but in this respect it cannot compete with the peculiar associations of Westminster Abbey.

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  • The Houses of Parliament, with Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's Church, complete the finest group of buildings which London possesses; a group essentially Gothic, for the Houses of Parliament, completed in 1867 from the designs m .

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  • The government offices are principally in Whitehall, the fine thoroughfare which connects Parliament Square, in the angle between the Houses and the Abbey, with Trafalgar Square.

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  • The Minories, a street leading south from Aldgate, takes name from an abbey of nuns of St Clare (Sorores Minores) founded in 1293.

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  • Westminster, facing the Abbey.

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  • Very shortly after (about 1134) the abbey of Stratford Langthorne in Essex was founded by William de Montfichet, who endowed it with all his lordship in West Ham.

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  • This was the Abbey of St Mary Graces, East-Minster or New Abbey without the walls of London, beyond Tower Hill, which Edward III.

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  • did little to connect his name with the history of London, although the erection of the exquisite specimen of florid Gothic at Westminster Abbey has carried his memory down in its popular name of Henry VII.'s chapel.

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  • Pitt was buried on the 22nd of February, and Fox on the 10th of October, both in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The terms of the judgment on a further claim are as follows: " The Court considers and adjudges that the lord mayor has by usage a right, subject to His Majesty's pleasure, to attend the Abbey during the coronation and bear the crystal mace."

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  • An abbey was founded here towards the end of the 5th century, and in the beginning of the 6th an episcopal see by St Jarlath.

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  • The cross of Tuam, re-erected in modern times, bears inscriptions in memory of Turlogh O'Conor, king of Ireland, and O'Hoisin, successively (1128) abbot of St Jarlath's Abbey and archbishop (1152) of Tuam, when the see was raised.

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  • Ethelstan died at Gloucester in 940, and was buried at Malmesbury, an abbey which he had munificently endowed during his lifetime.

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  • of Fareham, are ruins of the beautiful Tudor mansion, Place House, built on the site of a Premonstratensian abbey of the 13th century, of which there are also fragments.

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  • He died in London on the 12th of October 1859, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • c. 1088), German chronicler, was probably a Thuringian by birth and became a monk in the Benedictine abbey of Hersfeld in 1058.

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  • of the Monumenta of a Vita Lulli, Lullus, archbishop of Mainz, being the founder of the abbey of Hersfeld; and of a Carmen de bello Saxonico.

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  • According to tradition Iestynap-Gwrgan, the last prince of Glamorgan, had a residence somewhere near the present town, but Fitzhamon, on his conquest of Glamorgan, gave the district between the Neath and the Tawe to Richard de Granaville (ancestor of the Granvilles, marquesses of Bath), who built on the west banks of the Neath first a castle and then in 112 9 a Cistercian abbey, to whose monks he later gave all his possessions in the district.

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  • The portcullis gate and a tower are all that remain of it; of the abbey which was at one time the finest in Wales, there still exist the external walls, with parts of the chapel, vaulted chapter-house, refectory and abbot's house.

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  • This abbey was the spot where Edward II.

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  • At the dissolution the abbey and the manor of Cadoxton (part of its possessions) were sold to Sir Richard Williams or Cromwell.

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  • Copper smelting has been carried on in or near the town since 1584 when the Mines Royal Society set up works at Neath Abbey; the industry attained huge proportions a century later under Sir Humphrey Mackworth, who from 16 9 5 carried on copper and lead smelting at Melincrythan.

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  • By the first of these (1290) the town was granted a fair on St Margaret's Day (July 20) and as the abbey had extensive sheep walks the trade in wool was considerable.

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  • The older name of Hameln was Hameloa or Hamelowe, and the town owes its origin to an abbey.

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  • Kitzingen possessed a Benedictine abbey in the 8th century, and later belonged to the bishopric of Wiirzburg.

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  • The isolated tower, which is all that remains of the ancient abbey of S.

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  • He died on the 3rd of May 1888, at Abbey Wood, near London.

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  • in November 1245 he visited the abbey of Cluny and was presented by the abbot with gifts, the value of which surprised even the papal officials.

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  • Near the town are the ruins of the abbey of Heisterbach.

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  • Some very old cedars exist also at Syon House, Woburn Abbey, Warwick Castle and elsewhere, which presumably date from the 17th century.

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  • Educated at Meung and at Angers, he entered the Benedictine abbey of Bourgueil, and in 1079 became abbot of this place, but his time was devoted to literary pursuits rather than to his official duties.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the buildings of the celebrated Cistercian abbey of Morimond.

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  • In 1175 an abbey was founded here by Maurice M`Loughlin, king of Ireland.

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  • The abbey was converted in 1543 into a collegiate church for secular priests, and was dissolved by Edward VI., who granted it to Sir Nicholas Bagenal, marshal of Ireland.

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  • Cymbeline, the play he had been reading on the last afternoon, was laid in his coffin, and on the 12th he was publicly buried with great solemnity in Westminster Abbey.

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  • On the 28th of May the coffin, preceded by the two Houses of Parliament and escorted by the chief magnates of the realm, was carried from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey.

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  • The body was buried in the north transept of the abbey, where, on the 19th of June 1900, Mrs Gladstone's body was laid beside it.

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  • It is doubtless to the second half of the life of Vacarius that the composition must be attributed of two works the MS. of which, formerly the property of the Cistercian Abbey of Biddleston, is now in the Cambridge University library.

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  • The cathedral of St Benigne, originally an abbey church, was built in the latter half of the 13th century on the site of a Romanesque basilica, of which the crypt remains.

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  • The site of the abbey buildings is occupied by the bishop's palace and an ecclesiastical seminary.

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  • with the abbey of Bellozane.

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  • by rail, west of Kormend is the small town of Szent Gotthard (pop., 2055, mostly Germans), with a Cistercian abbey, founded by King Bela III.

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  • Fox is buried in Westminster Abbey by the side of Pitt.

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  • He died on the 8th of July 1716, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Between the two towns is Buckfast Abbey, said to have been, before the Conquest, a Benedictine house, and refounded for Cistercians in 1137.

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  • It is situated on the Traisen, a tributary of the Danube, and contains an interesting old abbey church, founded in 1030 and restored in 1266 and again at the beginning of the 18th century.

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  • An abbey dedicated to St Hippolytus was founded here in the 9th century, around which the town developed.

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  • Quickly attaining a prominent position among the Frankish nobles, he appears as rector of the abbey of Marmoutier in 852, and as one of Charles the Bald's missi dominici, in 853; but soon afterwards he was among those who rebelled against Charles, and invited the king's halfbrother, Louis the German, to invade West Francia.

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  • The principal buildings are the Roman Catholic church, which is the pro-cathedral of the diocese of Killaloe; the parish church formed out of the ruins of the Franciscan Abbey, founded in 1240 by Donough Carbrac O'Brien; a school on the foundation of Erasmus Smith, and various county buildings.

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  • The abbey, though greatly mutilated, is full of interesting details, and includes a lofty tower, a marble screen, a chapter-house, a notable east window, several fine tombs and an altar of St Francis.

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  • The interesting ruins of Clare Abbey, founded in 1194 by Donnell O'Brien, king of Munster, are half-way between Ennis and the village of Clare Castle.

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  • O'Brien also founded Killone Abbey, beautifully situated on the lough of the same name, 3 m.

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  • Among other works with which Britton was associated either as author or editor are Historical Account of Redcliffe Church, Bristol (1813); Illustrations of Fonthill Abbey (1823); Architectural Antiquities of Normandy, with illustrations by Pugin (1825-1827); Picturesque Antiquities of English Cities (1830); and History of the Palace and Houses of Parliament at Westminster (1834-1836), the joint work of Britton and Brayley.

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  • His family had held a good position in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire since the 12th century, the name appearing as Sent Cheveroll in the roll of Battle Abbey, and William inherited large estates from his father.

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  • Beaulieu, at the head of the picturesque estuary of the Beaulieu river, which debouches into the Solent, is famous for the ruins of Beaulieu Abbey, founded by King John for Cistercians.

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  • In Westminster Abbey a public memorial to Wolfe was unveiled on the 4th of October 1773.

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  • Near the station are the ruins of the abbey of Cistercian nuns founded by David I.

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  • Abbey and J.

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  • She died at the end of September 1435, and was interred without funeral honours in the abbey of St Denis, by the side of her husband, Charles VI.

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  • The Gothic abbey church dates from the 15th century, but its Romanesque crypt from the 12th.

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  • The pulpit was formerly used in the nave of Westminster Abbey, being presented to Belfast cathedral by the dean and chapter of that foundation.

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  • Of these Whitehouse and White Abbey are the principal on the western shore, and on the eastern, Holywood, which ranks practically as a suburb of Belfast, and, at the entrance to the lough, Bangor.

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  • in the abbey he had founded, where his tomb has been discovered.

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  • This monastery was restored in the reign of Robert Bruce, and became a cell of the abbey of canons regular at Inchaffray.

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  • His body lay in state at Greenwich and after a public funeral was buried in Henry VII.'s chapel at Westminster Abbey, to be disinterred at the Restoration.

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  • He was a spectator of the riot of St Giles's, Edinburgh, on the 23rd of July 1637, endeavoured in vain to avoid disaster by concessions, and on the taking of the Covenant perceived that "now all that we have been doing these thirty years past is thrown down at once."' He escaped to Newcastle, was deposed by the assembly on the 4th of December on a variety of ridiculous charges, and died in London on the 26th of November 1639, receiving burial in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The seigneurs of Bethune, avoues (advocati) of the great abbey of Saint-Vaast at Arras from the I 1 th century, were the ancestors of a great French house whence sprang the dukes of Sully, Charost, Orval, and Ancenis; the marquises of Rosny, Courville and Chabris; the counts of Selles and the princes of Boisbelle and Henrichemont.

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  • Anne died after a long illness on the 2nd of March 1619, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The legend probably originated in a desire to authenticate the relics in the abbey of Saint Denis, supposed to have been brought to Aix by Charlemagne, and is preserved in a 12th-century romance, Le Voyage de Charlemagne a Jerusalem et a Constantinople.'

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  • Stephani Frisingenses (15th century), which formerly belonged to the abbey of Weihenstephan, and is now at Munich, the childhood of Charlemagne is practically the same as that of many mythic heroes.

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  • A notable instance of this was afforded at Newstead, Notts, where the ruined front of Newstead Abbey was lowered several feet without any injury to the structure.

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  • Within four years there rose upon its site a pile of stately buildings under the title of St Benedict's Abbey and school, a monastic and collegiate institution intended for the higher education of the sons of the Roman Catholic nobility and gentry.

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  • Examples of the Romanesque basilica style are the church of Obermiinster, dating from Iwo, and the abbey church of St Emmeran, built in the 13th century, and remarkable as one of the few German churches with a detached belfry.

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  • The beautiful cloisters of the ancient abbey, one of the oldest in Germany, are still in fair preservation.

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  • an abbey here in the middle of the 7th century, and St Boniface established the bishopric about a hundred years later.

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  • by his wife Elizabeth Woodville, and was born, during his father's temporary exile, in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey on the 2nd of November 1470.

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  • are the remains of the Early English abbey of Fearn, founded at Edderton in 1230 by Farquhar, 1st earl of Ross, and transferred hither in 1338.

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  • Patrick Hamilton became titular abbot in 1517, and after his martyrdom the abbey was added to the bishopric of Ross.

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  • Its castle, now ruinous, was built as a hunting-lodge for Malcolm Canmore, but of the abbey which it possessed as early as the reign of Alexander II.

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  • Amesbury Abbey, a beautiful house built by Inigo Jones for the dukes of Queensberry, stands close to the village, in a park watered by the river Avon, here famous for its trout.

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  • The house afterwards acquired such ill repute that in 1177 the nuns were dispersed and the house was attached to the abbey of Fontevrault, by whom it was re-established.

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  • He was buried in Westminster Abbey at the foot of Shakespeare's statue with imposing solemnities.

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  • on his effigy in Westminster Abbey shows a circlet surmounted by four crosses and four fleurs-de-lys alternately, and has two arches rising from it.

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  • However, in 1625-1626 it is definitely recorded that the viscounts carried their coronets in their hands in the coronation procession from Westminster Hall to the Abbey church.

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  • The abbey was demolished in 1850.

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  • The manor of Zuilen on the Vecht, four miles north-west of Utrecht, was partly held in fief from this abbey and partly from the bishops of Utrecht.

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  • The Palais de Justice (18th century) was formerly the town house (refuge) of the abbey of Marchiennes.

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  • Only scanty remains are left of the once celebrated abbey of St Orens.

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  • In the 10th century Count Bernard of Armagnac founded the Benedictine abbey of St Orens, the monks of which, till 1308, shared the jurisdiction over Auch with the archbishops - an arrangement which gave rise to constant strife.

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  • But the influence of Cluny, even on monasteries that did not enter into its organism, was enormous; many adopted Cluny customs and practices and moulded their life and spirit after the model it set; and many such monasteries became in turn centres of revival and reform in many lands, so that during the 10th and 11th centuries arose free unions of monasteries based on a common observance derived from a central abbey.

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  • In Mary's reign some of the surviving monks were brought together, and Westminster Abbey was restored.

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  • Of the monks professed there during this momentary revival, one, Sigebert Buckley, lived on into the reign of James I.; and being the only survivor of the Benedictines of England, he in 1607 invested with the English habit and affiliated to Westminster Abbey and to the English congregation two English priests, already Benedictines in the Italian congregation.

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  • The English congregation is composed of three large abbeys (Downside, Ampleforth and Woolhampton), a cathedral priory (Hereford) and a nunnery (Stanbrook Abbey, Worcester): there are besides in England three or four abbeys belonging to foreign congregations, and several nunneries subject to the bishops.

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  • For a time the church belonged to Fontevrault Abbey in Normandy; but it was made over by Edward IV.

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  • Tintern Abbey >>

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  • Part of the walls and crypt remain of an abbey which dates from the foundation of a college of canons in 670.

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  • The church of St Michael dates from 1750, the abbey church having collapsed in the previous year.

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  • He lies in Westminster Abbey in the same grave as Grote.

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  • There is an archaeological museum in the old abbey buildings.

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  • In the suburb of Moritzberg there is an abbey church founded in 1040, the only pure columnar basilica in north Germany.

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  • In 818 he had given his estate at Michelstadt to the abbey of Lorsch, but he retained Mulinheim, where about 827 he founded an abbey and erected a church, to which he transported some relics of St Peter and St Marcellinus, which he had procured from Rome.

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  • The high-lying moorland of the surrounding district is diversified by picturesque, dales; and Harrogate is not far from many towns and sites of great interest, such as Ripon, Knaresborough and Fountains Abbey.

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  • Hardly any remains are left of a great Benedictine abbey, whose buildings at one time included an area of 4 acres.

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  • Among the abbots the most famous was John de Rutherwyk, who was appointed in 1307, and continued, till his death in 1346, to carry on a great system of alteration and extension, which almost made the abbey a new building.

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  • The first religious settlement in Surrey, a Benedictine abbey, was founded in 666 at Chertsey (Cerotesei, Certesey), the manor of which belonged to the abbot until 1539, since when it has been a possession of the crown.

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  • Chertsey owed its importance primarily to the abbey, but partly to its geographical position.

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  • See Lucy Wheeler, Chertsey Abbey (London, 1905); Victoria County History, Surrey.

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  • The principal villages, towns and places near or through which the way passed are as follow: Winchester, Alresvord, Ropley, Alton, Farnham (here the way follows the present main road), Seale, Puttenham, by the ruined chapel of St Catherine, outside Guildford, near where the road crosses the Wey above Shalford,' and by the chapel of St Martha, properly of " the martyr," now restored and used as a church, Albury, Shere, Gomshall, Dorking (near here the Mole is crossed), along the southern slope of Boxhill to Reigate, then through Gatton Park, Merstham, Otford, Wrotham, after which the Medway was crossed, Burham, past the megalithic monument Kit's Coty House, and the site of Boxley Abbey, the oldest after Waverley Abbey of Cistercian houses in England, and famous for its miraculous image of the infant saint Rumbold, and the still more famous winking rood or crucifix.

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  • In Westminster Abbey the space east of the transept is the presbytery, and the same arrangement is found in Canterbury Cathedral.

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  • The abbey of Corvey, where rested the bones of St Vitus, the patron saint of Saxony, soon became a centre of learning for the country, and the Saxons undertook with the eagerness of converts the conversion of their heathen neighbours.

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  • For a while he worked at the ironworks, Neath Abbey, Glamorgan, and then set.

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  • As many as 700 pairs of golden spurs were collected on the field from the bodies of French knights and hung up as an offering in an abbey church of the town, which has long disappeared.

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  • A strong machicolated and turreted wall surrounds the rock, running along its base on the south, ascending halfway up the cliff on the north, on which side it stands close to the abbey wall, and again descending on the west.

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  • The single street of the island curves from the gateway up to the abbey, ending in flights of steps leading to the donjon or chatelet.

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  • The abbey itself consists of an assemblage of buildings in three storeys upon massive foundations around the church, the most important portion, the Merveille, extending to the north.

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  • During the last thirty years of the Hundred Years' War the abbey offered a persistent resistance to the English.

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  • In the 18th and 19th centuries the abbey was used as a prison for political offenders, serving this purpose until 1863, when an extensive restoration, begun in 1838, was resumed.

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  • No more touching ceremony of the kind had ever been performed in Westminster Abbey.

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  • But it was arranged that the sovereign's procession to the abbey through the streets should be made a finer show than on previous occasions; and it drew to London 400,000 country visitors.

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  • In London the day itself was kept by a solemn service in Westminster Abbey, to which the queen went in state, surrounded by the most brilliant, royal, and princely escort that had ever accompanied a British sovereign, and cheered on her way by the applause of hundreds of thousands of her subjects.

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  • It is now established that he was a tenant of Peterborough Abbey, from which he held lands at Witham-on-the-Hill and Barholme with Stow in the south-western corner of Lincolnshire, and of Crowland Abbey at Rippingale in the neighbouring fenland.

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  • The earliest were the priory of Christ's Church and the abbey of St Peter and St Paul, now called St Augustine's, both at Canterbury, founded by Augustine and the monks who accompanied him to England.

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • Other houses of which there are slight remains are Lesnes abbey, near Erith, and Bilsington priory near Ashford, established in 1178 and 1253 respectively, and both belonging to the Augustinian canons; and the house of Franciscans at Canterbury (1225).

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  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).

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  • A similar series, in which sculptured figures of Christ and the Apostles are associated with the signs, is to be seen in perfect preservation on the chief doorway of the abbey church at Vezelay.

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  • In 1108 he retired into the abbey of St Victor, where he resumed his lectures.

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  • Here the clay of which the hill is formed is gradually giving way, causing landslips and the collapse of buildings, notably of the abbey church of S.

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  • This school used to occupy part of the old abbey of the Cambre, situated in a hollow near the bois and the avenue Louise, but owing to its insanitary position it has been removed to a new building near the Cinquantenaire.

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  • The chief routes are: - Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena (and thence to Coleraine and Londonderry); a line diverging from this at White Abbey to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland; branches from Ballymena to Larne and to Parkmore; and from Coleraine to Portrush.

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  • There are some remains of the ecclesiastic establishments at Bonamargy, where the earls of Antrim are buried, Kells, Glenarm, Glynn, Muckamore and White Abbey.

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  • He at once introduced himself to the distingu13hed French historian and diplomatist Robert Gaguin (1425-1502) and published a small volume of poems; and he became intimate with Johann Mauburnus (Mombaer), the leader of a mission summoned from Windesheim in 1496 to reform the abbey of Chateau-Landon.

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  • Contemporary with him were Hugh of St Victor and his pupil Richard of St Victor, both monks of the abbey of St Victor at Paris, the aim of whose teaching, based on that of the PseudoDionysius, was a mystical absorption of thought in the Godhead and the surrender of self to the Eternal Love.

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  • The Benedictine abbey of St Blasius was founded in 1063 and dissolved at the Reformation.

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  • c. 1048), French chronicler, was a monk of the Benedictine abbey of Fleury.

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  • This Epitoma vitae Roberti regis, which is probably part of a history of the abbey of Fleury, deals rather with the private than with the public life of the king, and its value is not great either from the literary or from the historical point of view.

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  • After the abolition of the States of the Church, he was treated by the French as a state prisoner, and lived for some years at the abbey of Monticelli, solacing himself with music and with bird-shooting, pastimes which he did not eschew even after his election as pope.

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  • Abbey, who painted a series, "The Development of the Law," for the Supreme Court room in the eastern wing and decorated the rotunda.

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  • of the town is situated Csorna, a village with a Premonstratensian abbey, whose archives contain numerous valuable historical documents.

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  • It was founded by King St Stephen, and the original deed from loot is preserved in the archives of the abbey.

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  • The abbey church of SS.

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  • did its early importance, to the abbey.

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  • At the time of the Domesday Survey it was owned by the abbey, which continued to be the overlord until the dissolution.

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  • The right to hold a fair was granted to the abbey by Henry III.

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  • He died in London of typhoid fever on the 27th of June 1883, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Lord Dundonald died in London on the 30th of October 1860, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • His mother, Margaret, granddaughter and heiress of John Holles, duke of Newcastle, brought to her husband Welbeck Abbey and other estates in Nottinghamshire.

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  • He is notable for having constructed the underground halls at Welbeck Abbey, and for his retiring habits of life, which gave occasion for some singular stories.'

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  • L'AUBESPINE, a French family which sprang from Claude de l'Aubespine, a lawyer of Orleans and bailiff of the abbey of St Euverte in the beginning of the 16th century, and rapidly acquired distinction in offices connected with the law.

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  • In England small herds are kept by the duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, and by Mr C. J.

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  • It was attached to a Benedictine priory, founded about the beginning of the 12th century as a cell of St Albans abbey by William de Albini.

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  • In 1448 this foundation became an abbey.

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  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

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  • In 948 Edred gave the church at Wellingborough to Crowland Abbey, and the grant was confirmed by King Edgar in 966.

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  • In Canterbury cathedral and Westminster Abbey it has definitely displaced the older Version.

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  • In 1534 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald, better known as Silken Thomas (so called because of a fantastic fringe worn in the helmet of his followers), a young man of rash courage and good abilities, son of the Lord Deputy Kildare, believing his father, who was imprisoned in the Tower of London, to have been beheaded, organized a rebellion against the English Government, and marched with his followers from the mansion of the earls of Kildare in Thomas Court, through Dame's Gate to St Mary's Abbey, where, in the council chamber, he proclaimed himself a rebel.

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  • He subsequently founded, near the castle, the Benedictine priory of St John, which he endowed and constituted a cell of Battle Abbey.

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  • In obedience to Cardinal de Noailles, archbishop of Paris, he left the Cistercian abbey of Sept-Fonds, to which he had retired, and settled in Paris, where he was placed at the head of the famous seminary of Saint Magloire.

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  • ABBEY (Lat.

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  • A priory only differed from an abbey in that the superior bore the name of prior instead of abbot.

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  • Westminster Abbey is another example of a great Benedictine abbey, identical in its general arrangements, so far as they can be traced, with those described above.

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  • Minster Parallel to the nave, on the south side of the cloister, Abbey.

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  • St Mary's Abbey, York, of which the ground-plan is annexed, exhibits the usual Benedictine arrangements.

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  • St Mary's Abbey, York (Benedictine).

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  • goo, a reformed Benedictine abbey was founded by William, duke of Aquitaine and count of Auvergne, under Berno, abbot of Beaume.

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  • - Abbey of Cluny, from Viollet-le-Duc.

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  • Abbey buildings.

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  • a patriarch, three archbishops, the two generals of the Carthusians and Cistercians, the king (St Louis), and three of his sons, the queen mother, Baldwin, count of Flanders and emperor of Constantinople, the duke of Burgundy, and six lords, visited the abbey, the whole party, with their attendants, were lodged within the monastery without disarranging the monks, 400 in number.

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  • Nearly the whole of the abbey buildings, including the magnificent church, were swept away at the close of the 18th century.

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  • It was adorned with the portraits of the chief benefactors of the abbey, and with Scriptural subjects.

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  • Owing its real origin, as a distinct foundation of reformed Benedictines, in the year 1098, to Stephen Harding (a native of Dorsetshire, educated in the monastery of Sherborne), and deriving its name from Citeaux (Cistercium), a desolate and almost inaccessible forest solitude, on the borders of Champagne and Burgundy, the rapid growth and wide celebrity of the order are undoubtedly to be attributed to the enthusiastic piety of St Bernard, abbot of the first of the monastic colonies, subsequently sent forth in such quick succession by the first Cistercian houses, the far-famed abbey of Clairvaux (de Clara Valle), A.D.

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  • general arrangement and distribution of the various buildings, which went to make up one of these vast establishments, may be gathered from that of St Bernard's own abbey of Clairvaux, which is here given.

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  • It will be observed that the abbey precincts are surrounded by a strong wall, fur nished at intervals with watch-towers and other defensive works.

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  • The large fish-ponds, an indispensable adjunct to any ecclesiastical foundation, on the formation of which the monks lavished extreme care and pains, and which often remain as almost the only visible traces of these vast establishments, were placed outside the abbey walls.

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  • As an example, we give the groundplan of Kirkstall Abbey, which is one of the best pre Abbeyall served.

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  • The abbey mill was situated about 80 yards to the north-west.

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  • Fountains Abbey, first founded A.D.

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  • g Abbey.

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  • - Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire (Cistercian).

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  • buildings of the abbey stretching down to and even across the stream.

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  • - Ground-plan of Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire.

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  • The annexed plan of the Abbey of St Augustine's at Bristol, now the cathedral church of that city, shows the arrangement of the buildings, which departs very little from the ordinary Benedictine type.

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  • The remains of the ancient abbey of St Corneille are used as a military storehouse.

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  • It was enriched by Charles the Bald with two castles, and a Benedictine abbey dedicated to Saint Corneille, the monks of which retained down to the 18th century the privilege of acting for three days as lords of Compiegne, with full power to release prisoners, condemn the guilty, and even inflict sentence of death.

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  • It contains a fine abbey church of the 12th century and in the cemetery connected with it are many tombstones of the 13th and, 4th centuries.

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  • 1300), French chronicler, was a monk in the abbey of St Denis.

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  • About 1285 he was placed in charge of the abbey library as custos cartarum, and he died in June or July 1300.

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  • The town owes its origin to a Benedictine abbey, which was founded in the 7th century, and at one time it was a free city of the empire.

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  • In support of this argument it is to be noted that the forged document first appears at the abbey of St Denis, where Stephen spent the winter months of 754.

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  • The church of St Andrew is a spacious transitional Norman and Early English building, with later additions, and was formerly a chapel of ease to Waverley Abbey, of which a crypt and fragmentary remains, of Early English date, stand in the park attached to a modern residence of the same name.

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  • The church of St Mary and St Aldhelm, standing high, is a majestic fragment consisting of the greater part of the nave (with aisles) of a Benedictine abbey church.

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  • Maildulphus, a Scottish or Irish monk, who came into England about 635, built a hermitage near the site of the modern Malmesbury (Maildulphi-urbs, Maldelmesburh, Malmesbiri) and gathered disciples round him, thus forming the nucleus of the later abbey of which Aldhelm his pupil became the first abbot.

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  • Round the abbey the town of Malmesbury grew up, and by the time of the Domesday Survey it had become one of the only two Wiltshire boroughs.

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  • In the middle ages Malmesbury possessed a considerable cloth manufacture, and at the Dissolution the abbey was bought by a rich clothier and fitted with looms for weaving.

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  • The fine remains of Bolton Abbey lie in the Wharfe valley, 5 m.

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  • In the latter edition a continuation, the Annales Furnesienses (1190-1298), composed by a monk of Furness Abbey, Lancashire, is also given.

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  • St Peter's chapel formerly served as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Armagh; and in the abbey of the Dominican nuns there is still preserved the head of Oliver Plunkett, the archbishop who was executed at Tyburn in 1681 on an unfounded charge of treason.

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  • Of the Dominican monastery (1224) there still exists the stately Magdalen tower; while of the Augustinian abbey of St Mary d'Urso (1206) there are the tower and a fine pointed arch.

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  • Preaching at the Abbey gave him a valued opportunity of dealing with social questions.

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  • He was consecrated on the 1st of May at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Thompson (of York), Hort being the preacher, and enthroned at Durham cathedral on the 15th of May.

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  • Here also Owen Glendower unfurled the banner of Welsh independence; from here, in 1401, he harassed the country, sacking Montgomery, burningWelshpool, and destroying Cwm Hir (long "combe," or valley) abbey, of which some columns are said to be now in Llanidloes old church..

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  • The annual increase in girth is often considerable even in large trees; the fine larch near the abbey of Dunkeld figured by Strutt in his Sylva Britannica increased 22 ft.

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  • The interest of the place centres in its abbey, which since 1804 has been utilized and abused as a central house of detention for convicts.

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  • The second court of the abbey contains a remarkable building, the Tour d'Evrault (12th century), which long went under the misnomer of chapelle funeraire, but was in reality the old kitchen.

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  • Street in 1860, is remarkable; the richness of the work within increases from west to east, culminating in a choir arcade decorated with work among the finest of its period extant; the period is that of the choir of Westminster Abbey, and from a comparison of building materials, choir arcades and sculpture of foliage, a common architect has been suggested.

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  • Hewas buried in Coniston churchyard by his own express wish, the family refusing.the offer of a grave in Westminster Abbey.

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  • de Felice, 1906); La vie de St Edmund le Rei, by Denis Pyramus, end of 12th century (Memorials of St Edmund's Abbey, edited by T.

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  • He attended Queen Mary during her last illness and preached her funeral sermon in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Among the other noteworthy buildings of Freiburg are the palaces of the grand duke and the archbishop, the old town-hall, the theatre, the Kaufhaus or merchants' hall, a 16th-century building with a handsome façade, the church of St Martin, with a graceful spire restored 1880-1881, the new town-hall, completed 1901, in Renaissance style, and the Protestant church, formerly the church of the abbey of Thennenbach, removed hither in 1839.

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  • But Mercy had divined his Battle of adversary's plan, and leaving a garrison to hold Freiburg, the Bavarian army had made a night march on the 9/loth to the Abbey of St Peter, whence on the morning of the 10th Mercy fell back to Graben, his nearest magazine in the mountains.

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  • Turenne's advanced guard appeared from the Glotter Tal only to find a stubborn rearguard of cavalry in front of the abbey.

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  • After taking his degree in arts, he returned to the abbey, where he was professed; but he was at the university again in 1537 and took his B.D.

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  • Returning to Evesham he was there when the abbey was surrendered to the king (27th of January 1540); and then, with a pension of fro a year, he once more went back to Oxford, but soon after became chaplain to Bishop Bell of Worcester and then served Bonner in that same capacity from 1543 to 1549.

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  • The abbey school was reopened and the shrine of St Edward restored.

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  • The abbey was dissolved (12th of July 1559), and within a year Feckenham was sent by Archbishop Parker to the Tower (loth of May 1560), according to Jewel, "for having obstinately refused attendance on public worship and everywhere declaiming and railing against that religion which we now profess" (Parker Society, first series, p. 79).

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  • the cartularies of the church and the town of Die (1868), of the abbey of St Andre le-Bas at Vienne (1869),(1869), of the abbey of Notre Dame at Bonnevaux in the diocese of Vienne (1889), of the abbey of St Chaffre at Le Monestier (1884), the Cheviot Hills inventories and several collections of archives of the dauphins of Viennais, and a Bibliotheque liturgique in six volumes (1893-1897), the third and fourth volumes of which constitute the Repertorium hymnologicum, containing more than 20,000 articles.

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  • The Scottish king conferred on Walter various lands in Renfrewshire, including Paisley, where he founded the abbey in 1163.

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  • The cathedral was founded on the ruins of St Wilfrid's abbey about 680, but of this Saxon building nothing now remains except the crypt, called St Wilfrid's Needle.

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  • In the vicinity is the domain of Studley Royal, the seat of the marquess of Ripon, which contains the celebrated ruins of Fountains Abbey.

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  • - From the strictly architectural point of view the subject of church building, including the development of the various styles and the essential features of the construction and arrangement of churches, is dealt with elsewhere (see Architecture; Abbey; Basilica).

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  • Local rivalry, too, played a large part, one wealthy abbey building " against " another, much in the same way as modern business houses endeavour to outshine each other in the magnificence of their buildings.

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  • Heppenheim, at first the property of the abbey of Lorsch, became a town in 1318.

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  • In 1086 three manors of Lyme are mentioned: that belonging to Sherborne abbey, which was granted at the dissolution to Thomas Goodwin, who alienated it in the following year; that belonging to Glastonbury, which seems to have passed into lay lands during the middle ages, and that belonging to William Belet.

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  • enclosures of so or 60 acres, surrounded by strong walls of which traces can still be seen in the lower courses of the north and east town-walls of Chester, in the abbey gardens at York, and on the south side of Caerleon.

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  • The name, Hamstede, is synonymous with "homestead," and the manor is first named in a charter of Edgar (957-975), and was granted to the abbey of Westminster by Ethelred in 986.

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  • The town contains three old churches, of which the early Gothic abbey church with its Romanesque cloister is most notable, and some good houses.

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  • The abbey is now a royal castle, and in the neighbourhtood a hunting-lodge was built by King Maximilian II.

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  • Holy Cross is a remnant of a mitred abbey of Benedictines, said to have been founded about 970 by King Edgar, on the site of a Mercian religious settlement.

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  • In the neighbourhood is the Trappist abbey of Mount St Bernard, founded in 1835, possessing a large domain, with buildings completed from the designs of A.

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  • It contained an ancient abbey and a hunting château belonging to the dukes of Brabant.

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  • The church of St Peter and St Paul belonged to a former abbey, and has a tower at the north-west corner which is a converted round tower.

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  • The Dominican Abbey, of the 13th century, has Early English remains of great beauty and a tomb to Edmund, the last of the White Knights, a branch of the family of Desmond intimately connected with Kilmallock, who received their title from Edward III.

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  • His mind was cultivated; he was a discriminating patron of literature, and Westminster Abbey is an abiding memorial of his artistic taste.

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  • The ground-plan of Easby Abbey, owing to its situation on the edge of the steeply sloping banks of a river, is singularly irregular.

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  • - St Augustine's Abbey, Bristol (Bristol Cathedral).

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  • Abbey gateway.

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  • Of the convents of the Carmelite or White Friars we have a good example in the Abbey of Hulne, near Alnwick, the first of the order in England, founded A.D.

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  • To the east may be traced the site of the abbey mill, with its dam and mill-lead.

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  • FOUNTAINS ABBEY, one of the most celebrated ecclesiastical ruins in England.

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  • Mainly on the north side of the stream, in an open glade, rise the picturesque and extensive ruins, the church with its stately tower, and the numerous remnants of domestic buildings which enable the great abbey to be almost completely reconstructed in the mind.

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  • The arrangements are typical of a Cistercian house (see Abbey).

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  • Near the abbey is the picturesque Jacobean mansion of Fountains Hall.

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  • In 1132 the prior and twelve monks of St Mary's abbey, York, being dissatisfied with the easy life they were living, left the monastery and with the assistance of Thurstan, archbishop of York, founded a house in the valley of the Skell, where they adopted the Cistercian rule.

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  • His example was followed by Serlo, a monk of St Mary's abbey, York, and by Tosti, a canon of York, and others.

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  • in 1291 appointed John de Berwick custodian of the abbey so that he might pay their debts from the issues of their estates, allowing them enough for their maintenance, and Edward II.

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  • See Victoria County History, Yorkshire; Dugdale, Monasticon; Surtees Society, Memorials of the Abbey of St Mary of Fountains, collected and edited by J.

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  • The town and lands belonged of old to the Abbey of Deer, built in the 13th century by William Comyn, earl of Buchan; but when the abbey was erected into a temporal lordship in the family of Keith the superiority of the town passed to the earl marischal, with whom it continued till the forfeiture of the earldom in 1716.

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  • There are some remains (including a portion in the square, now used as a public library established in 1799) of the magnificent abbey of St Mary and St Rumon, founded in 961 by Orgar, earl of Devon.

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  • The abbey church was rebuilt in 1285, and the greater part of the abbey in 1457-58.

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  • The early history of Tavistock (Tavistoke) centres round the abbey of St Rumon.

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  • Kempe, Notices of Tavistock and its Abbey (London, 1830); R.

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  • After the destruction of Furness Abbey, Ulverston succeeded Dalton as the most important town in Furness, but the rapid rise of Barrow surpassed it in modern times.

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  • Early in the 12th century the manor passed to Stephen, count of Boulogne, and was given by him to Furness Abbey.

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  • The other moiety returned to the abbey about the end of the 4th century, and at the dissolution was surrenc'ered to the Crown.

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  • At the peace of Westphalia (1648), accordingly, Hesse-Cassel was augmented by the larger part of the countship of Schaumburg and by the abbey of Hersfeld, secularized as a principality of the Empire.

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  • In 1240 the church was bestowed by David, bishop of St Andrews, on Dunfermline Abbey, and in 1 334 the town with its harbour was granted by David II.

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  • to the same abbey, by which it was conveyed to the bailies and council in 1450, when Kirkcaldy was created a royal burgh.

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  • The principal buildings are the Stadt Kirche, a beautiful Gothic building, erected about 1320 and restored in 1899, with a fine tower and a large bell; the old and interesting town hall (Rathaus) and the ruins of the abbey church.

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  • Hersfeld owes its existence to the Benedictine abbey (see below).

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  • The Benedictine abbey of Hersfeld was founded by Lullus, afterwards archbishop of Mainz, about 769.

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  • In the middle ages the abbey was famous for its library.

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  • He received several grants of monastic estates, including the priory of Christ Church in London and the abbey of Walden in Essex, where his grandson, Thomas Howard, earl of Suffolk, built Audley End, doubtless named after him.

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  • In the vicinity of the town are remnants of the monastery of Saul, a foundation ascribed to St Patrick, and of Inch Abbey (1180), founded by Sir John de Courcy.

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  • On the hills above the town is situated the church and abbey of the Madonna de Montallegro, whose miraculous picture attracts pilgrims from all parts of Italy.

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  • The lordship of the manor was granted to Waltham Abbey.

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  • The appearance of the plague at Padua obliged him to retire to his native city, whence he was, shortly afterwards, called to act as tutor to Ferrante (Ferdinand) Gonzaga, from whom he received the rich abbey of Guastalla.

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  • He died on the 4th of May 1677, and was interred in Westminster Abbey, where a monument, surmounted by his bust, was soon after erected by the contributions of his friends.

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  • In 1246 Reginald de Mohun, then lord of the manor, founded a Cistercian abbey at Newenham within the parish of Axminster, granting it a Saturday market and a fair on Midsummer day, and the next year made over to the monks from Beaulieu the manor and hundred of Axminster.

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  • The abbey was dissolved in 1539.

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  • Encamping in the neighbourhood of the Abbey Craig - on which now stands the national monument to his memory - he watched the passage of the Forth.

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  • Although Wimborne (Wimburn) has been identified with the Vindogladia of the Antonine Itinerary, the first undoubted evidence of settlement is the entry of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, under the date 718, that Cuthburh, sister of King Ine, founded the abbey here and became the first abbess; the house is also mentioned in a somewhat doubtful epistle of St Aldhelm in 705.

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  • It is crossed by several bridges - including the Abercorn, St James's and the Abbey Bridges - and two railway viaducts.

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  • The old town, on the west bank of the stream, contains most of the principal warehouses and mills; the new town, begun towards the end of the 18th century, occupies much of the level ground that once formed the domains of the abbey.

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  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

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  • In the abbey precincts are statues to the poet Robert Tannahill (1774-1810) and Alexander Wilson (1766-1813), the American ornithologist, both of whom were born in Paisley, and, elsewhere, to Robert Burns, George Aitkin Clark, Thomas Coats and Sir Peter Coats.

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  • The abbey was founded in 1163 as a Cluniac monastery by Walter Fitzalan, first High Steward of Scotland, the ancestor of the Scottish royal family of Stuart, and dedicated to the Virgin, St James, St Milburga of Much Wenlock in Shropshire (whence came the first monks) and St Mirinus (St Mirren), the patron-saint of Paisley, who is supposed to have been a contemporary of St Columba.

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  • The monastery became an abbey in 1219, was destroyed by the English under Aymer de Valence, earl of Pembroke, in 1307, and rebuilt in the latter half of the 14th century, the Stuarts endowing it lavishly.

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  • The abbey lands, after passing from his son the earl of Abercorn to the earl of Angus and then to Lord Dundonald, were purchased in 1764 by the 8th earl of Abercorn, who intended making the abbey his residence, but let the ground for building purposes.

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  • The abbey church originally consisted of a nave, choir without aisles, and transepts.

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  • The castle is at least as old as the 12th century and belonged to Robert de Croc, who witnessed the charter of the foundation of Paisley Abbey.

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  • The place seems to have been first known as Paslet or Passeleth, and was assigned along with certain lands in Renfrewshire to Walter Fitzalan, founder of the abbey.

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  • The village grew up round the abbey, and by the 15th century had become sufficiently important to excite the jealousy of the neighbouring burgh of Renfrew.

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  • Cameron Lees, The Abbey of Paisley (1878); Swan, Description of the Town and Abbey of Paisley (1835); and Robert Brown, History of Paisley (1886).

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  • On the high ground to the west lie ruins of the Cistercian abbey of Merevale, founded in 1149; they include the gatehouse chapel, part of the refectory and other remains exhibiting beautiful details of the 14th century.

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  • It receives the Salanfe (left), which forms the celebrated waterfall of Pissevache, before reaching the ancient town and abbey of St Maurice (92m.).

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  • to the monks of Reading, who built in it a cell of their abbey, and under whose protection the town grew up and was exempted from the sphere of the county and hundred courts.

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  • A market was held by the abbey by a grant of Henry I.; Friday is now market day.

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  • In 1086 the abbey of Shaftesbury held the manor, which afterwards passed to the Norman kings, who raised the castle.

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  • was a manor belonging to the abbey of Cockersand.

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  • Another exception to the incidence of tithes were abbey lands.

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  • The following are also of interest: - Sauveterre, founded in 1281, a striking example of the bastide of that period; Conques, which has a remarkable abbey-church of the II th century like St Sernin of Toulouse in plan and possessing a rich treasury of reliquaries, &c.; Espalion, where amongst other old buildings there are the remains of a feudal stronghold and a church of the Romanesque period; Najac, which has the ruins of a magnificent château of the 13th century; and Sylvanes, with a church of the 12th century, once attached to a Cistercian abbey.

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  • Hay was an excellent public speaker; some of his best addresses are In Praise of Omar; On the Unveiling of the Bust of Sir Walter Scott in Westminster Abbey, May 21, 1897; and a memorial address in honour of President McKinley.

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  • He died on the 6th of June 1820, and was buried in Westminster Abbey close to the tombs of Pitt and Fox.

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