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telephone

telephone

telephone Sentence Examples

  • It was like Connie to spend as little time on the telephone as possible.

  • She stared out the windows at the telephone poles as they approached and sped off in a blur.

  • Giddon was obviously watching her, so calling on her telephone might be tipping her hand.

  • He hadn't discouraged the short telephone calls with Connie on his phone.

  • The delayed conversation indicated he was talking on the telephone.

  • It was bits and pieces of a telephone conversation with a mystery person.

  • And yet, Yancey had mentioned cocaine in his telephone conversation.

  • Still, if that were the case, she need not have brought up the telephone call at the table.

  • Their telephone conversation last night concluded with the decision that Connie would pick her up at the end of the drive today at 11:30 am.

  • One evening, when Tammy was in bed and the three of them were relaxing in the family room, the telephone rang.

  • Lisa dropped her pad and pencil on the couch and crossed the room, wondering who might be calling her on his telephone and why Yancey was screening her calls.

  • The voice on the telephone became urgent.

  • Apparently his mood had been inspired by the telephone call she made to Connie a few nights ago.

  • If she could get to her telephone, she could call someone for help.

  • The telephone drowned out his response, and Lisa darted to her room.

  • Yancey lifted the telephone from her hand.

  • The moment was so tense that, when the telephone rang, they both jumped.

  • The voice on the telephone had belonged to a middle-aged woman dressed modestly in a dark suit.

  • Cynthia looped the coils of the telephone cord around her finger.

  • Wireless Internet was not available at the cabin and our computer had no means for a telephone hook-up.

  • The fellow worker promised to dig around and telephone back.

  • Martha would talk to Quinn... to grease the skids... as she put it, and have him telephone me the following evening.

  • "Telephone someone," Betsy said between sobs.

  • Once my telephone ordeal was over, everything was out of our hands.

  • We would, as Betsy suggested, telephone the tip on our way back to New York.

  • He so busied himself with his silly telephone trick to call away the mother he didn't notice someone who must have been watching.

  • Saturday ended with one success in four tries, and a sizeable telephone bill.

  • After a brief discussion we decided to telephone first and leave the visit option on the table, at least for now.

  • They gave me a special telephone where the calls come in.

  • I could call ahead for a camp site; I know the telephone area code and prefix.

  • Impatience prompted me to telephone Ethel Reagan before the allotted hour was up.

  • I'll stick around here and telephone Howie.

  • I questioned the newspaper woman in Boston, by telephone, in hopes of enticing her to meet with me under the guise of my writing a magazine article.

  • Ten minutes later I heard a telephone ringing downstairs.

  • I took time before retiring for the day to telephone Martha with the good news Julie's break in was a false alarm.

  • A ringing telephone interrupted us.

  • He heard the operator's voice on the telephone.

  • Howie doesn't want you to simply telephone Willard Humphries; he wants you to go down there and look him in the eye when you ask him.

  • The third room was for Howie who was busy on the telephone when four of us arrived.

  • It was the sound I hated more on a telephone that Henri Mancini's version of Theme from Moon Glow or any other top one hundred hits of elevator music was, 'would you please hold'?

  • Unfortunately, you were far more careless calling your tip line and a telephone code was noted and remembered by the operator.

  • Martha Boyd would be leaving, so the telephone informed them.

  • Unless there was a pending crisis of major proportions, telephone messages remained unanswered and promises unfulfilled.

  • They had given Martha a telephone card and asked she contact them as soon and as often as she could.

  • He picked up the telephone and handed it to her.

  • The telephone confab was between Rose and Cynthia and apparently the two spoke with like mind.

  • He picked up the telephone.

  • Paul made this telephone message—for when we weren't home.

  • The telephone lines between New Jersey and Colorado continued to burn about the confirmed August wedding date.

  • There was nothing they could say or do about Martha's situation except to keep their telephone nearby and pray for the best.

  • But as many times as David Dean considered picking up the telephone, it remained snuggled in its cradle unless Cynthia was answering it.

  • They had just finished the meal when the telephone rang, but not with news of Martha.

  • A quick telephone call to Jake Weller produced no further word on whether or not Fitzgerald had reported as summoned to Denver.

  • Fred O'Connor and David Dean kept close tabs on the New Jersey nuptials via telephone.

  • After the telephone call tonight, he wasn't so sure money was an asset.

  • Several times the telephone rang and he hurried to answer it as if he were expecting a call.

  • They could have said that much over the telephone.

  • Several nights later the telephone rang and Carmen answered it.

  • She provided the requested information, explained that she was going to assist him and then put the telephone on the floor, still open.

  • He should have no trouble figuring out where he lived, worked or what his telephone number was.

  • She gave them her sister's address and telephone number and promised to keep in touch.

  • Alex was finishing supper with his family when the telephone rang in his office.

  • He strode to his office and picked up the telephone receiver of the land line.

  • They had not seen her since their wedding but Cynthia spoke to her by telephone frequently and the two were as close as the distance allowed.

  • When she told them the valuable stuff I had, they asked for my telephone number.

  • A sharp ring from the hall telephone interrupted him.

  • At first he feared it was a telephone until its uninterrupted sound told him otherwise.

  • She rose, and to Dean's surprise, went to the hall telephone.

  • I don't mean to be disrespectful, ma'am, but when we spoke on the telephone, I offered you the letters and the clothing.

  • Dean picked up the telephone and called Sheriff Weller.

  • Dean was wondering about her answer, as the telephone rang.

  • Crumpled in the waste paper basket was a small piece of white paper with a telephone number.

  • What in hell would Jerome Shipton be doing with Janet's telephone number?

  • It'll give you a chance to telephone to Cynthia, too.

  • He then asked if he might use her telephone with his phone card.

  • Then he asked, "Did you get to telephone 'the lovely Queen Sinthee?'"

  • Dean brought Fred up to date on not only the telephone call to his wife, but his meeting with Weller and his speculation that Cynthia might have seen Donnie Ryland near the accident scene.

  • It was never clear if that was the case and the kid lucked out, but Dean used the excuse of mock consternation to excuse himself and walk uptown to telephone Cynthia.

  • Before he could answer, the bedside telephone shrilled, its shocking ring penetrating the late night stillness.

  • The telephone in faraway Indiana rang, first in their agreed sequence, then twenty times before Dean gave up and turned out the light.

  • Once in his bedroom, he closed the door and again tried to telephone Cynthia.

  • Dean had tried to telephone Cynthia once more with no luck.

  • Dean had no more than hung up from yet another unsuccessful telephone try when the phone rang.

  • He could picture her sitting there, listening to the ringing telephone, but not wanting to answer it.

  • Bells started going off in Dean's mind at the same time bells started ringing in the hall telephone.

  • Then, as if explaining her long distance telephone expenditure added, "She got a free phone card for listening to a time share pitch."

  • But he's going to miss the telephone and television -- and that tiny bedroom upstairs isn't exactly the Hotel Hilton.

  • I don't have anything against a telephone.

  • The telephone rang and she dropped the hoe, racing for the house.

  • Carmen made it to the telephone on the sixth ring, gasping for breath as she picked up the receiver.

  • And then the telephone buzzer rang.

  • The dogs were distracted momentarily by the sound of the telephone, but when it stopped ringing, they advanced further.

  • Later she received a telephone call from the Norfolk Police Department, but it only confirmed what Officer McCarthy had already told her.

  • Dean had already over­stayed his visit, so with promises to return if he had any more questions and to keep in telephone contact, he took his leave, shaking Cynthia Byrne's hand and waving to Janice Riley, who was again on the phone.

  • Mayer's telephone rang and he excused himself to answer it, leaving Dean at Jeffrey Byrne's grey steel desk.

  • There was also a large note reminding him of a 10:00 court appearance today and two telephone messages.

  • Although Ethel and Fred had never met, that didn't stop them from developing a strong mutual dislike, fueled via telephone mes­sages and third-party comments.

  • The unearthly shrill of the telephone shattered the scene, once, twice, three times before Dean clawed at the instrument and grumbled something.

  • Three more telephone calls to Cece Baldwin were as unsuc­cessful as the first and Dean spent the rest of the evening poring over the Byrne file.

  • It listed apartments, furnished or unfur­nished and a telephone number, just in case someone should hap­pen by.

  • Fred motioned to the telephone across the room.

  • Cleary had contacted her by telephone, saying he was looking for a furnished apartment to use when he traveled to the city.

  • The original telephone call had come on April sixth.

  • Randy had been told before school about the telephone call from Norfolk and she had dismissed his offer to fly down with her.

  • She asked for a few minutes to call Randy first and Dean took the time to telephone Fred, filling him in on the latest happen­ings.

  • He munched on a leftover casserole some thoughtful neighbor had donated to poor hero Fred and was about to doze when the telephone startled Mrs. Lincoln from his lap.

  • Fred said nothing and Dean finally dropped the bombshell—Chip Burgess's telephone identi­fication of Cleary-Byrne.

  • Mrs. Glass's number was on the telephone pad.

  • Just telephone stuff— nothing public unless there's proof.

  • I still hate it when the telephone rings.

  • Before Dean finished hanging up his coat, pouring a cup of over-brewed coffee and settling in his chair, Rita Angeltoni dropped a pile of telephone messages on his desk.

  • Dean shuffled through the remaining telephone messages, recognizing most as unfinished business from pending investiga­tions, but one caught his eye.

  • Dean planned to telephone Fred directly from Willoughby's to make absolutely sure no inquisitive eavesdropper could arrive at the bar before he was securely in place.

  • The morning dragged into lunchtime and Dean remained at Randy's urging, in hopes that Cynthia would telephone.

  • Before Dean could reply, the telephone rang for the third time, with a shrillness that startled them both.

  • After a few seconds he handed the detective the telephone.

  • I am out of town but I will telephone you when I return on Sunday.

  • They tried a couple of times to telephone Mrs. Porter back in Parkside but weren't able to get through.

  • Much as Dean wanted to telephone Cynthia Byrne, he knew it wasn't appropriate—suicide was a better word.

  • He could see the biker clearly now, six or seven telephone poles ahead.

  • He located a public telephone and, with a pocketful of coins, he commenced dialing.

  • Have you ever left your telephone behind – or off when he needed to reach you?

  • Carmen had only taken a few bites before the telephone rang – a reminder that her cell phone was in her room.

  • Not according to his comments on the telephone.

  • To her, a telephone was a necessity, not a convenience.

  • Still, the telephone conversation was obviously private.

  • She reached for the telephone on her hip, but it was gone.

  • As she neared the back door, she heard the telephone ringing.

  • In that instant the telephone rang.

  • The telephone rang and she opened her eyes.

  • The line clicked, but she stood there holding the telephone.

  • Ten O'clock found her hanging over the telephone, her cell phone on her hip.

  • Breakfast was interrupted by the telephone, and Alex went to answer it.

  • Next time we decide to spend some time alone, I'm going to bury your telephone.

  • As she stepped inside, the telephone was ringing.

  • She pointed to the destroyed telephone.

  • Felipa looked back and forth at the telephone and Carmen, obviously at a loss for words.

  • The telephone rang twice before a familiar voice answered.

  • Oh, for a telephone.

  • Maybe he would throw it away, but if he had second thoughts, at least he had her telephone number now.

  • The city is generously provided with all the modern public services, including two street car lines, local and long distance telephone lines, electric power and light, and waterworks.

  • Although formerly in very extensive employment, this instrument is dropping out of use and the " sounder " (and in many cases the telephone) is being used in its place.

  • At the receiving end there are two telephone receivers, one joined in the loop circuit, the other in the earth return circuit.

  • The signals must therefore be sent at regular intervals, and to ensure this being done correctly a telephone or time-tapper is provided at each keyboard to warn the operator of the correct moment to depress his keys.

  • A further cause has been competition offered by the telephone service, but against this the Post Office has received royalties from telephone companies and revenue from trunk telephone lines.

  • If the current is interrupted or alternating, and if a telephone receiver has its terminals connected to a separate metallic circuit joined by earth plates at two other places to the earth, not on the same equipotential surface of the first circuit, sounds will be heard in the telephone due to a current passing through it.

  • Hence, by inserting a break-and-make key in the circuit of the battery, coil or dynamo, the uniform noise or hum in the telephone can be cut up into periods of long and short noises, which can be made to yield the signals of the Morse alphabet.

  • Canal system of flow lines of current through the sea, and these might be detected by any other ships furnished with two plates dipping into the sea at stem and stern, and connected by a wire having a telephone in its circuit, provided that the two plates were not placed on the same equipotential surface of the original current flow lines.

  • Willoughby Smith found that it was not necessary even to connect the telephone to a secondary circuit, but that it would be affected and give out sounds merely by being held in the variable magnetic field of a primary circuit.

  • By the use of a key in the battery circuit as well as an interrupter or current reverser, signals can be given by breaking up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods.

  • An interrupted current having a frequency of about 400 was used in the primary circuit, and a telephone was employed as a receiver in the secondary circuit.

  • A similar installation of inductive telephony, in which telephone currents in one line were made to create others in a nearly parallel and distant line, was established in 1899 between Rathlin Island on the north coast of Ireland and the mainland.

  • He proposed to employ two large flat coils of wire laid horizontally, on the ground, that on the mainland having in circuit a battery, interrupter and key, and that on the island a telephone.

  • On one or more of the carriages of the trains were placed also insulated metallic sheets, which were in connexion through a telephone and the secondary circuit of an induction coil with the earth or rails.

  • The telephone used was Edison's chalk cylinder or electromotograph type of telephone.

  • Thus, in the case of one station and one moving railway carriage, there is a circuit consisting partly of the earth, partly of the ordinary telegraph wires at the side of the track, and partly of the circuits of the telephone receiver at one place and the secondary of the induction coil at the other, two air gaps existing in this circuit.

  • The signals were sent by cutting up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods in accordance with the Morse code by manipulating the key in the primary circuit.

  • One of these was to be connected to the earth through a telephone receiver, and the other through the secondary circuit of an induction coil in the primary circuit of which was a key.

  • In circuit with this battery was placed the secondary circuit of an induction coil, the primary circuit of which contained a telephone transmitter or microphone interrupter.

  • At the receiving station a telephone receiver was placed in series with another insulated battery, the negative terminal of which was to be in connexion with the earth.

  • He discovered a fact subsequently rediscovered by others, that a tube of metallic filings, loosely packed, was sensitive to electric sparks made in its vicinity, its electrical resistance being reduced, and he was able to detect effects on such a tube connected to a battery and telephone at a distance of 500 yds.'

  • 2 The tube provided with certain screw adjustments had a single cell and a telephone placed in series with it, and one end of the tube was connected to the earth and the other end to a receiving antenna.

  • It was then found that when electric waves fell on the antenna a sound was heard in the telephone as each wave train passed over it, so that if the wave trains endured for a longer or shorter time the sound in the telephone was of corresponding duration.

  • In this manner it was possible to hear a Morse code dash or dot in the telephone.

  • In its course it passes through a glass tube wound over with two coils of wire; one of these is an oscillation coil through which the oscillations to be detected pass, and the other is in connexion with a telephone.

  • When the oscillations pass through the coil they annul the hysteresis and cause a change of magnetism within the coil connected to the telephone.

  • This creates a short sound in the telephone.

  • Hence according as the trains of oscillations are long or short so is the sound heard in the telephone, and these sounds can be arranged on the Morse code into alphabetic audible signals.

  • Fessenden employed a simple fine loop of Wollaston platinum wire in series with a telephone and shunted voltaic cell, so that when electric oscillations passed through the fine wire its resistance was increased and the current through the telephone suddenly diminished (R.

  • - A, antenna; P S, jigger or oscillation transformer; C, condenser; 0, Fleming oscillation valve; B, working battery; T, telephone; R, rheostat; E, earth-plate.

  • The receiving arrangements comprised also an open or antenna circuit connected directly with a closed condenser-inductance circuit, but in place of the spark gap in the transmitter an electrolytic receiver was inserted, having in connexion with it as indicator a voltaic cell and telephone.

  • long upheld by a box kite, and, employing a sensitive coherer and telephone as a receiver, he was able, on December 12, 1901, to hear " S " signals on the Morse code, consisting of three dots, which he had arranged should be sent out from Poldhu at stated hours, according to a preconcerted programme, so as to leave no doubt they were electric wave signals sent across the Atlantic and not accidental atmospheric electric disturbances.

  • At the receiving end are a similar antenna and resonant circuit, and a telephone is connected across one part of the latter through an automatic interrupting device called by Poulsen a " ticker."

  • To send signals the continuous or nearly continuous train of waves must be cut up into Morse signals by a key, and these are then heard as audible signals in the telephone.

  • TELEPHONE (Gr.

  • Telephony is the art of reproducing sounds at a distance from their source, and a telephone is the instrument employed in sending or receiving such sounds.

  • Another and somewhat similar example is furnished by what has been variously designated as the " string," toy," " lovers," and " mechanical " telephone.

  • Experiments bearing on this subject were subsequently made by a great number of investigators.4 Page's discovery is of considerable importance in connexion with the theory of action of various forms of telephone, and was a very important feature in the early attempts by Reis to transit music and speech.

  • In Reis's lecture an apparatus was described which has given rise to much discussion as to priority in the invention of the telephone.

  • The instrument was described in over fifty publications 6 in various countries, and was well known to physicists previous to Bell's introduction of the electric telephone as a competitor with the electric telegraph.

  • P. Thompson, Philipp Reis, the Inventor of the Telephone (London, 1883).

  • The quality of the sounds was to some extent also reproduced; but, judging from the results of later telephone investigation, it is highly probable that this was due, not to the varying duration, but to the varying firmness of the contact.

  • The next worker at the telephone, and the one to whom the present great commercial importance of the instrument is due, Bell's re- was Bell.

  • Bell, " Telephone Researches," in Journ.

  • - Bell's Telephone (1877).

  • A telephone transmitter and a receiver on a novel plan were patented in July 1877 by Edison, shortly after the introduction of Bell's instruments.

  • In another form of telephone, brought prominently forward by Professor A.

  • Dolbear, 2 the effects were produced by electrostatic instead of electromagnetic forces, as in con- the Bell telephone.

  • Varley, who proposed to make use of it in a telegraphic receiving instrument.4 In Dolbear's instrument one plate of a condenser was a flexible diaphragm, connected with the telephone line in such a way that the varying electric potential produced by the action of the transmitting telephone caused an increased or diminished charge in the condenser.

  • Hughes, while engaged in experiments upon a Bell telephone in an electric circuit, discovered that a peculiar noise was produced whenever two hard electrodes, such as two wires, were - drawn across each other, or were made to touch each other with a variable degree of firmness.

  • Acting upon this discovery, he constructed an instrument which he called a " microphone," 6 and which consisted essentially of two hard carbon electrodes placed in contact, with a current passing through the point of contact and a telephone included in the same circuit.

  • The line of circuit passed through the secondary of the induction coil I to the line, from that to the telephone T at the receiving station, 'See Journal of the Telegraph, New York, April 1877; Philadelphia Times, 9th July 1877; and Scientific American, August 181 This term was used by Wheatstone in 1827 for an acoustic apparatus intended to convert very feeble into audible sounds; see his Scientific Papers, p. 32.

  • The employment of the telephone as one of the great means of communication requires a definite organization of the subscribers.

  • The territory in which a telephone administration operates is usually divided into a number of local areas, in each of which one or more exchanges are placed.

  • The method first employed for working a telephone line was extremely simple.

  • A single line of wire, like an ordinary telegraph line, had a Bell telephone included in it at each end, and the ends were put to earth.

  • Words spoken to the telephone at one end could be heard by holding the telephone to the ear at the other.

  • To obviate the inconvenience of placing the telephone to the mouth and the ear alternately, two telephones were commonly used at each end, joined either parallel to each other or in series.

  • The telephone was switched out of circuit when not in use and the bell put in its place, a key being used for throwing the battery into circuit to make the signal.

  • This arrangement is still employed, a hook being attached to the switch lever so that the mere hanging up of the telephone puts the bell in circuit.

  • - Telephone Set with Transmitter in a Local Circuit.

  • In the earliest telephone switchboards the lines were connected to vertical conducting strips, across which were placed a series of similar horizontal strips in such a manner that any horizontal could be connected to any line strip by the insertion of a plug into holes provided in the strips for the purpose.

  • Each telephone set was equipped with a special key or switch by means of which the telephone could be transferred from an exclusive line to the call-wire at will.

  • The other supervisory lamp on the cord circuit is controlled in a similar manner by the subscriber who originated the call, and as that subscriber's telephone is off the hook when the peg is inserted, the lamp is not lighted at all until the subscriber replaces the receiver.

  • In one arrangement, now in extensive use, each telephone set is fitted with a relay of high inductance which is bridged across the circuit in series with a condenser.

  • The movements of the shaft are controlled by relays and electro-magnets which operate in response to the action of the subscriber whose telephone is fitted with a 'calling mechanism which, when the subscriber calls, earths the line a certain number of times for each figure in the number of the wanted subscriber.

  • In large towns telephone distribution by means of open wires is practically impossible, and the employment of cables either laid in the ground or suspended from poles or other overhead supports is necessary.

  • Speech has been habitually transmitted for business purposes over a distance of 1542.3 m., viz., over the lines of the American Telegraph and Telephone Company from Omaha to Boston.

  • As no practical process of telephone relaying has been devised, it is extremely important that the character of the line should be such as to favour the preservation of the strength and form of the telephone current.

  • Oliver Heaviside showed mathematically that uniformly-distributed inductance in a telephone line would diminish both attenuation and distortion, and that if the inductance were great enough and the insulation resistance not too high the circuit would be distortionless, while currents of all frequencies would be equally attenuated.

  • - The records of the telephone industry in Great Britain during the thirty years from 1877 to 1907 form an instructive chapter in the industrial history of the country.

  • (c) The remarkable success achieved by the National Telephone Company, despite these obstacles, in developing an extensive organization and a profitable business.

  • Graham Bell's telephone patent was granted for the United Kingdom.

  • Edison's telephone patent was granted for the United Kingdom.

  • The Edison Telephone Company of London was formed.

  • The two companies amalgamated as the United Telephone Company Ltd.

  • Edison Telephone Company, 6 Q.B.D., 244) that the telephone was a telegraph, and that telephone exchange business could not legally be carried on except by the PostmasterGeneral or with his consent.

  • The United Telephone Company confined its operations to London; subsidiary companies were formed to operate in the provinces.

  • The Post Office at the same time established several telephone exchanges in provincial towns so as to enable the PostmasterGeneral " to negotiate with the telephone companies in a satisfactory manner for licences."

  • The Post Office proposed to engage in active competition with the telephone companies, but the Treasury at that time opposed this policy on the ground that the state should at most be ready to supplement and not to supersede private enterprise.

  • The United Telephone Company asked parliament for rights of way in streets but was refused, and its only right to place overhead wires was obtained by private wayleaves.

  • The United Telephone Company again applied unsuccessfully for right to lay wires underground.

  • After the withdrawal of the restriction against the companies erecting trunk wires it became evident that the development of the telephone services throughout the country would be facilitated by complete intercommunication and uniformity of systems, and that economies could be effected by concentration of management.

  • The various companies therefore amalgamated as the National Telephone Company.

  • The Bell telephone patents expired.

  • The National Telephone Company applied to the London County Council for permission to lay wires underground and continued efforts till 1899 to obtain this power, but without success.

  • The duke of Marlborough, in the name of the New Telephone Company, inaugurated a campaign for cheaper telephone services, but the New Telephone Company was subsequently merged in the National Telephone Company.

  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for powers to lay wires underground; public discontent with inadequate telephone services was expressed, and at the same time the competition of the telephone with the Post Office telegraph became more manifest.

  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for power to lay wires underground, but was refused.

  • The draft agreement between the government and the National Telephone Company to carry out the policy of 1892 was submitted to parliament and led to much discussion.

  • The corporation of Glasgow having persisted in its efforts to obtain a licence, the Treasury appointed Sheriff Andrew Jameson (afterwards Lord Ardwall) a special commissioner to hold a local inquiry in Glasgow to report whether the telephone service in that city was adequate and efficient and whether it was expedient to grant the corporation a licence.

  • The licence of the National Telephone Company was extended so as to be co-extensive with that of a competitive licence for any locality on condition that the company should afford intercommunication with the telephone systems of the new licensees.

  • In short, all-round competition was authorized, and the Post Office decided to establish a telephone system in London in competition with the company.

  • The Telegraph Act 1899, while providing for intercommunication between the telephone systems of the local authorities and the company, did not give the Post Office the right to demand intercommunication between its exchanges and those of the company.

  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.

  • Hull and Portsmouth were the only municipal telephone systems working in 1907.

  • The effect of the unsettled policy of the Post Office until 1905 and of the difficulties created by the local authorities was that the National Telephone Company was never able to do its best to develop the enterprise on the most efficient lines.

  • In 1885 there were only 3800 telephone subscribers in London and less than io,000 in the rest of the United Kingdom, and telephonic services were available in only about 75 towns, while in the same year the American Bell Telephone Company had over 134,000 subscribers.

  • Large as this progress was it would have been much greater if the Telephone Company had been granted adequate powers to put wires underground and thus instal a complete metallic circuit in place of the single wire, earthreturn, circuit which it was constrained to employ.

  • In 1906 there were 30,551, equal to 7.2 per cent., more telephone stations in the United Kingdom than in the ten European countries of Austria, Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Italy; Norway, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland, having a combined population of 288 millions as against a population of 42 millions in the United Kingdom.

  • The only European country which can be compared with the United Kingdom in telephone development is Germany.

  • of the population were telephone subscribers.

  • Telephone business is characterized by two features: (I) that the capital account is never closed, and (2) that the costli - ness of the service increases with the size of the undertaking.

  • The original method of charging adopted in Great Britain took the telephone instrument as the unit, charging a fixed annual rental independent of the amount of use to which the instrument was put.

  • The study of telephone economics showed that the proper basis for charging was the " message-mile," on the theory that the user should pay according to the facilities offered and the extent to which he made use of them.

  • For instance, in the county of London, the telephone tariff is £5 per annum plus id.

  • For subscribers who desire the telephone for occasional use, the party-line system has been devised, whereby several telephones are connected to one line leading to the exchange.

  • The fee charged for the use of public telephone call offices is 2d.

  • Subscribers to exchanges may also make arrangements to have all telegrams (except Press telegrams) ad - dressed to them delivered by telephone instead of messenger.

  • Telephone subscribers may also obtain the services of an express messenger by telephoning to the nearest post office connected with the exchange.

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