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senses

senses Sentence Examples

  • He has to learn how... and maybe he senses your anxiety.

  • So this killer senses the threat isn't finished.

  • "I hope Howie has come to his senses and booked his flight back," Betsy said, then added, "But I'll miss Molly like she was my own."

  • The spidey senses that warned him when a vamp was around calmed until he no longer sensed Jonny.

  • He hesitated, and her senses tingled in warning.

  • Jule's wariness made his senses heighten.

  • His senses tingled, and he dwelled on how his defensive powers almost seemed to work when nothing else did.

  • His tingling senses awoke him, but he was too weak to do more than look around the room.

  • Yully snapped back to her senses, her eyes opening.

  • He opened his senses.

  • The Original Being was impossible to track with his senses and seemed to fade in and out of existence.

  • She stretched her senses and pulled everything to her.

  • The warmth of his body made her senses tingle with both need and happiness.

  • She tore out of his room, the scent of his blood ensnared in her senses.

  • He entered her room, emitting enough of his power to hide him from her senses.

  • An odd sense entered her mind, dulling her senses.

  • His nearness rattled her senses in a way that reminded her of how she felt around Gabriel.

  • His solid frame and heat were creeping into her senses, tugging at her resolve to resist.

  • Deidre found herself leaning into his solid frame without resistance, entranced by the combination of his hot, hard body and cool fire on her swimming senses.

  • He was saturating her senses, seducing her somehow.

  • Except she was suddenly hungry again, the faint, sweet scent winding through her senses.

  • Her senses addled, Deidre was forced to retreat.

  • She tried to turn away, but the smell filled her senses with inhuman hunger and desperation.

  • Her senses became saturated quickly by his scent and heat.

  • She ran her hand down his arm and side, unable to shake the desire to saturate her senses with every part of him.

  • It raced through her body, lulling her into a strange trance of heightened senses while he drank.

  • She didn't fully understand the demon senses that Darkyn indicated were part of her now.

  • Without the senses of a deity, she was unaware of him.

  • She tasted sweet and saucy, like the woman herself, her heat, scent and silky skin filling his senses in a way that left him wanting more of her.

  • She slowed, hating that she no longer had the heightened senses of a deity.

  • The human senses that made her gasp at the colors of spring flowers were also ill-made to defend them against Immortals and deities.

  • He pushed the door to a dark room open, using his senses to key in on where the person was.

  • He waited another moment, unleashing his senses.

  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

  • He didn't push himself awake but let his senses register the world slowly.

  • She scrambled off him, senses reeling.

  • She stood in the warm silence, senses intoxicated by their bond, his scent and body.

  • She repeated the sentence over and over to try to block out what her senses told her about the size of the monster.

  • Only then did her senses register the three men before her, the alley, and the familiar bloodlust in their glowing eyes.

  • His eyes glowed more unnaturally than the others, the taste of her addling his senses.

  • His scent tickled her senses, his nearness making her warm body warmer.

  • She started after him, senses scattered.

  • Jared.s senses were more acute than his, and he turned to face the direction of the castle.

  • His sweet smell and the feel of his soft skin lingered in her senses after she.d carried him from the forest.

  • He held her against him, his dark, spicy-sweet scent seizing her senses.

  • Being so close rattled her senses, and she thought again of the kiss they had shared over a month before.

  • He lifted her at last and carried her to his quarters, senses full of her quickened breath, heady female scent, sweet taste.

  • Her senses filled with his taste, scent, the heat of his body, enveloping her yet never enough.

  • They were both becoming accustomed to their superior strength and heightened senses.

  • Tell me, are you still all doe-eyed and searching for happily-ever-after, or have you come to your senses?

  • Great. A little tingly, like my senses are heightened somehow.

  • I can't wait to try out my new Spidey Senses.

  • A warm embrace caught her mid-fall over the cliff, and the scent of soap and man penetrated her bewildered senses.

  • Gabriel went still like he did when he was stretching his senses to test their surroundings.

  • "Give it time.  One man – even Andre – couldn't solve the world's problems.  You just have to wait it out.  And hope we all come to our senses before the end of the world," Kiki said with a small smile.

  • Unable to sleep without knowing the truth, Toby huddled beneath the jungle leaves and stretched his senses until he found Katie.  He couldn't put her in more danger, if there was something wrong with Ully.  She was close enough for him to find when he needed to.  If he kept some distance between him and Katie, he could figure out what was wrong with Ully without endangering her more.

  • Punching the buttons on his car radio, he finally found music that didn't assault his senses and pushed ahead toward Parkside, ready to call it a day.

  • Worse yet, when Lori finally came to her senses, they wouldn't be willing to let her have the baby.

  • She'd learned to stop thinking when in the ring with him and listen to her senses, to include the mind control talent.

  • The colors and sensations of the immortal world were richer on the senses, but the mortal world seemed raw, untamed.

  • Scaling the wall once again, she dropped to her feet and was still for a long moment, using her senses to see if anyone was there.

  • He focused on his senses to pick up the location of the Other that had been in the wine cellar.

  • Jenn's magic and senses came alive like they did in the immortal world.

  • His senses picked up more Watcher and Other activity than normal this morning.

  • Her body felt heavy and her senses dull without her magic.

  • Jenn closed her eyes, reveling in her freed senses and allowing her instincts to guide her.

  • His sight was poor enough that the moonlight hurt his eyes, but his other senses were strong after growing up beneath the ground.

  • He ignored the senses warning him of the guards drawing near and instead smoothed dark hair from her face and listened for her breathing.

  • The woman rose, her honey musk teasing his senses as she moved around the chamber.

  • He lowered his eye-band once more, engaging his other senses.

  • His senses painted a scene in the darkness behind his eyelids.

  • He rode hard until the horse's breathing grew labored and then he slowed, senses alert.

  • My senses are more refined than yours.

  • My eyes are weak, but my hearing and my other senses are not, he answered.

  • The shock of the shake accompanying the shout flung her deadened senses awake.

  • Awareness filled and overwhelmed her senses, blinding her to all but instinct and the sound of her breathing.

  • Her senses caught up with her, jarring her out of her mind.

  • She sought to right her reeling senses, registering Taran's scent.

  • Taran breathed deeply, allowing his senses to fill with the woman gazing up at him.

  • The trickle of a familiar stream heightened her dulled senses, and she forced herself onward, through the brush and to the stream.

  • He squinted, senses heightening.

  • As he sucked in deep breaths, his senses went mad when they detected her approach.

  • Masked and hooded to hide his deformity, Xander relied on his special senses, the ones that no one else possessed.

  • He used his gifts to get him home, fast, after another of his senses tipped him off.

  • With his extra sensitive senses, he often found himself lost in the feel or scent of things.

  • He forced himself out of his senses and draped the cloak over his mother.

  • Xander engaged his senses and trotted through the nearly vacant streets.

  • Xander tilted his head to the side, following the teenaged God with his senses.

  • Xander used his senses to find the girl within the bright building.

  • Xander left his bedroom, irritated, and stretched his senses.

  • He started his Tai Chi routine, focusing externally while the night filled his heightened senses.

  • Jonny tripped his senses again.

  • Even with his belly full, Xander's senses were nearly ensnared by the scent of food.

  • The girl wasn't alone; she was with a woman, one that was completely invisible to his senses.

  • In all his years, he'd never met a human capable of slipping by his senses.

  • Xander stretched his senses to seek out any other minds in the condo.

  • As soon as she was more than three feet away, she disappeared from his enhanced senses.

  • His senses picked up six Guardians.

  • Xander's senses picked up nothing, but they wouldn't.

  • As before, even seeing her, his extra senses didn't identify anyone stood before him until he was within three feet of Jessi.

  • When Jessi tripped his senses, he tensed so quickly, he nearly leapt out of his seat.

  • She disappeared from his senses.

  • He tensed as she tripped his senses again.

  • She focused hard on the clasp, her senses filling with him.

  • He reached past her, his heat and scent stirring her senses once more.

  • It swallowed her senses, but she wasn't about to lose complete control to someone like Xander.

  • Desire sharpened her senses, which did her no good with the pain radiating down her arm.

  • She didn't think she could, not with her senses scrambled.

  • Guilt and need warred as her senses became saturated with his oak-amber scent, the warmth of his body at her back.

  • He held her for another minute, until her senses returned.

  • He strode out of the kitchen, leaving her alone to try to regain her senses.

  • As soon as Jessi crossed outside of three feet, she disappeared from his senses.

  • Your skill appears to be that your mind can't be manipulated, and you are … undetectable to our heightened senses.

  • The gifts are almost like enhanced senses.

  • Xander kept up with her easily, the solid, warm body beside her affecting her senses in ways that made her angrier.

  • He followed them into the worn down building, senses alert.

  • His velvety mouth and full lips, combined with his amber-oak scent, intoxicated her senses.

  • His senses were at their max.

  • Or else he'd send in someone who could move under the senses of the Guardians.

  • His senses picked up on the Guardians and Gods gathered in the red barn.

  • You know you're invisible to my senses.

  • Xander's heightened senses were able to see everything from above – except Jessi.

  • Xander jogged into the fog, using his senses to guide him.

  • Relying solely on his mortal senses, the Other unleashed a bolt of purple lightening.

  • Blood filled his senses, and his gaze drifted to the Original Other.

  • His comforting scent and heat filled her senses.

  • In fact, so far as the direct evidence of our senses tells us, matter appears to be indefinitely divisible.

  • As in children, imagination and the senses prevailed in those men of the past.

  • " I had forgotten all; I knew not what was passing in me; with my soul rather than my senses, I breathed an air of ineffable sweetness.

  • The Latin term is consecratio, which of course has a variety of senses, including simple burial.

  • Apotheosis may also be used in wider senses.

  • The history, indeed, of many a word lies hid in its equivocal uses; and it in no way derogates from the dignity of the highest poetry to gain strength and variety from the ingenious application of the same sounds to different senses, any more than from the contrivances of rhythm or the accompaniment of imitative sounds.

  • " I can say with truth," he writes to the princess Elizabeth, 9 " that the principle which I have always observed in my studies, and which I believe has helped me most to gain what, knowledge I have, has been never to spend beyond a very few hours daily in thoughts which occupy the imagination, and a very few hours yearly in those which occupy the understanding, and to give all the rest of my time to the relaxation of the senses and the repose of the mind."

  • Perceiving further, that in order to understand these relations I should sometimes have to consider them one by one, and sometimes only to bear them in mind or embrace them in the aggregate, I thought that, in order the better to consider them individually, I should view them as subsisting between straight lines, than which I could find no objects more simple, or capable of being more distinctly represented to my imagination and senses; and on the other hand that, in order to retain them in the memory or embrace an aggregate of many, I should express them by certain characters, the briefest possible."

  • Examining next what immediately follows the knowledge of pure intellect, he will pass in review all the other means of knowledge, and will find that they are two (or three), the imagination and the senses (and the memory).

  • " It seems to me," he says, " that in receiving such and such an idea the mind is passive, and that it is active only in volition; that its Psychoi deas are put in it partly by the objects which touch the senses, partly by the impressions in the brain, and partly also by the dispositions which have preceded in the mind itself and by the movements of its will."

  • In general, Aquinas maintained in different senses the real existence of universals ante rem, in re and post rem.

  • Deep into the night he would continue his studies, stimulating his senses by occasional cups of wine, and even in his dreams problems would pursue him and work out their solution.

  • It is, however, less liable to cause confusion, and in many other ways more convenient to employ the better known term Marsupialia in both senses.

  • He adds a reason that recalls one of Plato's, " As manifestly as the human soul is by means of the senses linked to the present life, so manifestly it attaches itself by reason, and the conceptions, conclusions, anticipations and efforts to which reason leads it, to God and eternity."

  • i.), "the very name, like that of the gesith, has different senses in different ages and kingdoms, but the original idea of military service runs through all the meanings of thegn, as that of personal association is traceable in all the applications of gesith."

  • They did not make much use of the word " intuition," which may indeed be taken in different senses, e.g.

  • The term is borrowed from Sight, of all the physical senses the one which most rapidly instructs the mind.

  • (The senses are so far from truth that we must be content with reaching probability.) In Cicero's De Natura Deorum the burden of theism rests mainly on the Stoic interlocutor.

  • 3 In his view of touch and taste, as the two fundamental and essential senses, he may remind one of Herbert Spencer's doctrine.

  • In zoology, the mollusca are divided into cephalous and acephalous (Acephala), according as they have or have not an organized part of their anatomy as the seat of the brain and special senses.

  • Begriff), in philosophy, a term applied to a general idea derived from and considered apart from the particulars observed by the senses.

  • That coat-armour has been lavishly granted and often assumed without right, that the word "gentleman" has acquired various secondary senses, proves nothing; that is the natural result of a state of things in which the status of gentry carries with it no legal advantage, and yet is eagerly sought after on social grounds.

  • The senses are "bad witnesses" (KaKoi, uapTvpes); only the wise man can obtain knowledge.

  • He particularly congratulated himself on having discovered the " philosophical argument " against transubstantiation, " that the text of Scripture which seems to inculcate the real presence is attested only by a single sense - our sight, while the real presence itself is disproved by three of our senses - the sight, the touch, and the taste."

  • The word "fish" is used in many technical senses.

  • 2.214) as consisting in: " (I) the dualistic opposition of the divine and the earthly; (2) an abstract conception of God, excluding all knowledge of the divine nature; (3) contempt for the world of the senses, on the ground of the Platonic doctrines of matter and of the descent of the soul from a superior world into the body; (4) the theory of intermediate potencies or beings, through whom God acts upon the world of phenomena; (5) the requirement of an ascetic self-emancipation from the bondage of sense and faith in a higher revelation to man when in a state called enthusiasm."

  • Senses and Intelligence of Ants.

  • - That ants possess highly developed senses and the power of communicating with one another has long been known to students of their habits; the researches of P. Huber and Sir J.

  • senses of "clerkship" and "learning" have long since fallen obsolete.

  • He conducted experiments to show that certain abstract forms and proportions are naturally pleasing to our senses, and gave some new illustrations of the working of aesthetic association.

  • 3, 4a): the keepers of the house (the arms and hands) tremble, the strong men (the legs and perhaps the backbone) are bent, the grinding women (the teeth) cease to work, those that look out of the windows (the eyes) are darkened, the street-doors are shut, the sound of the mill being low (apparently a summary statement of the preceding details: communication with the outer world through the senses is cut off, the performance of bodily functions being feeble); the rest of v.

  • The senses with their changing and inconsistent reports cannot cognize this unity; it is by thought alone that we can pass beyond the false appearances of sense and arrive at the knowledge of being, at the fundamental truth that "the All is One."

  • Its ten Sephiroth are made up of the grosser elements of the former three worlds; they consist of material substance limited by space and perceptible to the senses in a multiplicity of forms. This world is subject to constant changes and corruption, and is the dwelling of the evil spirits.

  • Thus the telegraph posts along a certain road have a space-order very obvious to our senses; but they have also a time-order according to dates of erection, perhaps more important to the postal authorities who replace them after fixed intervals.

  • If the senses of rotation be opposite we have the skew orthogonal substitution x1 =cos0Xi+sinOX2r x 2 = sin °Xicos OX2r of modulus -1.

  • Each of these five effects may occur in two opposite senses.

  • The term "reason" is also used in several narrower senses.

  • Ueberweg cites a passage from his theological works which apparently bears out this view, for William there expressly distinguishes the two senses of the word " same."

  • The great age of Scholasticism presents, indeed, a substantial unanimity upon this vexed point, maintaining at once, in different senses, the existence of the universals ante rem, re and post rem.

  • To this Scotus opposed an indeterminism of the extremest type, describing the will as the possibility of determining itself motivelessly in either of two opposite senses.

  • The principal symptons of chronic ether-drinking are a weakening of the activity of the special senses, and notably sight and hearing, a lowering of the intelligence and a degree of general paresis (partial paralysis) of motion.

  • In the fourth book he discusses the Epicurean doctrine of the images, which are cast from all bodies, and which act either on the senses or immediately on the mind, in dreams or waking visions, as affording the explanation of the belief in the continued existence of the spirits of the departed.

  • In these senses the word is now obsolete.

  • Now there are two senses in which knowledge may claim to be absolute.

  • The most general application of the word in these transferred senses is that of an influential supporter or protector.

  • The individual ego is only possible as opposed to a non-ego, to a world of the senses; thus God, the infinite will, manifests himself in the individual, and the individual has over against him the non-ego or thing.

  • In 1855 he published his first large work, The Senses and the Intellect, followed in 1859 by The Emotions and the Will.

  • His own philosophical writings already published, especially The Senses and the Intellect (to which was added, in 1861, The Study of Character, including an Estimate of Phrenology), were too large for effective use in the class-room.

  • This was succeeded (1887, 1888) by a new edition of the Rhetoric, and along with it, a ° book On Teaching English, being an exhaustive application of the principles of rhetoric to the criticism of style, for the use of teachers; and in 1894 he published a revised edition of The Senses and the Intellect, which contains his last word on psychology.

  • Tertullian (c. 160-240) uses it in both senses, of an oath, as in the passage of his treatise About Spectacles, where he says that no Christian " passes over to the enemy's camp without throwing away his arms, without abandoning the standards and sacraments of his chief."

  • " But by what means," he asks, " can experience and the senses give ideas ?

  • True, nothing is in the intellect which has not been in the senses, but we must add except the intellect itself.

  • The soul contains the notions of being, substance, unity, identity, cause, perception, reasoning and many others which the senses cannot give.

  • 66yµa, from 60KE7v, to seem; literally " that which seems, sc. good or true or useful " to any one), a term which has passed through many senses both general and technical, and is now chiefly used in theology.

  • This goodness, therefore, alone exists; matter, motion, growth and decay are figments of the senses; they have no existence for Reason.

  • These, the two senses recognized by Congregationalism, remained the only ones known to primitive Christianity.

  • In these senses the word has frequently been referred to Lat.

  • It is different, too, for different senses with the same observer, and different even for the same sense when the external stimuli differ in intensity.

  • Among the different senses in which "sovereign" has been used are the following: a.

  • Territorial sovereignty is used in a variety of senses.

  • He was so wonder-struck that he could not walk to his place, but stood as if he had lost his senses, and kept muttering, "All this for a woman!"

  • In philosophy the word has several closely related technical senses.

  • The wider view, according to which the hypothesis of direct transmission of physical influences expresses only part of the facts, is that all space is filled with physical activity, and that while an influence is passing across from a body, A, to another body, B, there is some dynamical process in action in the intervening region, though it appears to the senses to be mere empty space.

  • Thus the attempt to find out a constitution for the aether will involve a synthesis of intimate correlation of the various types of physical agencies, which appear so different to us mainly because we perceive them through different senses.

  • What is put before us, whether by the senses or by the statements of others, is instinctively accepted as a veracious report, till experience has proved the i P oss P P P bility of deception.

  • The opposition, being taken as absolute, implies the impeachment of the veracity of the senses in the interest of the rational truth proclaimed by the philosophers in question.

  • Starting with " particular perceptions " or isolated ideas let in by the senses, he never advances beyond these " distinct existences."

  • The fact that the conclusion is in " direct and total opposition" to the apparent testimony of the senses is a fresh justification of philosophical scepticism.

  • For, indeed, scepticism with regard to the senses is considered in the Inquiry .to be sufficiently justified by the fact that they lead us to suppose " an external universe which depends not on our perception," whereas " this universal and primary opinion of all men is soon destroyed by the slightest philosophy."

  • The term Eudaemonia has been taken in a large number of senses, with consequent variations in the meaning of Eudaemonism.

  • Muller, our leading authority, adopts the confusing plan of calling them second maxillae in the Cypridinidae (including Asteropidae), maxillipeds in the Halocypridae and Cyprididae, and first legs in the Bairdiidae, Cytheridae, Polycopidae and Cytherellidae, so that in his fine monograph he uses the term first leg in two quite different senses.

  • It may be objected that hereby the term pleon is used in two different senses, first applying to the abdomen alone and then to the abdomen plus the last thoracic segment.

  • It is true that even by the most thorough-going allegorists the literal sense of Scripture was not openly and entirely disregarded; but the very fact that the study of Hebrew was never more than exceptional, and so early ceased to be cultivated at all, is eloquent of indifference to the original literal sense, and the very principle of the many meanings inherent in the sacred writings was hostile to sound interpretation; greater importance was attached to the " deeper " or " hidden " senses, i.e.

  • In some senses, this learned and consummately clever man may be looked upon as the real founder of the Society as history knows it.

  • In philosophical terminology this word is used in two main senses: (I) in ethics, for the view that man is not responsible for his actions, which have, therefore, no moral value; (2) in psychology, for all actions which are not the result of collation or conscious endeavour.

  • Such hallucinations are commonly provoked by crystal-gazing, but auditory hallucinations may be caused by the use of a shell (shell-hearing), and the other senses are occasionally affected.

  • The other half, Eastern in two senses, is both wider and higher than the nave.

  • The ethics of these principles were worked out in Discours sur le bonheur, La Volupte, and L' Art de jouir, in which the end of life is found in the pleasures of the senses, and virtue is reduced to self-love.

  • Happiness in this world consists proximately in virtue as a harmony between the three parts, rational, spirited and appetitive, of our souls, and ultimately in living according to the form of the good; but there is a far higher happiness, when the immortal soul, divesting itself of body and passions and senses, rises from earth to heaven and contemplates pure forms by pure reason.

  • The above are good senses of the word, but it is also used in the sense of devoting things and persons to destruction; and in this sense it is tantamount to cursing.

  • He himself identifies phenomenon, appearance, effect or impression produced on consciousness through any of the senses.

  • Next, he supposes that mind obeys the same law of evolution, and exemplifies integration by generalization, differentiation by the development of the five senses, and determination by the development of the order of consciousness.

  • It may be urged in reply that the synthetic philosophy could be made consistent by transferring the knowable resistance and persistence of the unknowable noumenon to knowable phenomena on the one hand, and on the other hand by maintaining that all phenomena from the original nebula to the rise of consciousness are only ` 0 impressions produced on consciousness through any of the senses," after all.

  • But sometimes also it means what appears, or can appear, to the senses, as distinguished from what does not appear, but can be inferred to exist.

  • Now, Kant and his followers start from this second and narrower meaning, and usually narrow it still more by assuming that what appears to the senses is as mental as the sensation, being undistinguishable from it or from the idea of it, and that an appearance is a mental idea(Vorstellung) of sense; and then they conclude that we can know by inference nothing but such mental appearances, actual and possible, and therefore nothing beyond sensory experience.

  • I perceive pressure, heat, color, sound, flavor and odor in my five senses.

  • The former error needs something deeper than a Kantian critique of reason, or an Avenarian criticism of experience; it needs a criticism of the senses.

  • We want an answer to this question - What must we know by the senses in order to enable us to know what we infer by reason in the sciences?

  • Having thus begun by touch and tactile inference, we confirm and extend our inferences of bodies in Nature by using the rest of the senses.

  • This is not to forget that the five senses are not our whole stock or to confine inference to body.

  • In the first place, there are great differences between the sensible and the external object; they differ in secondary qualities in the case of all the senses; ' and even in the case of touch, heat felt within is different from the vibrating heat outside.

  • Thirdly, the external world and the senses always act on one another by cause and effect and by pressure, although we only feel pressure by touch.

  • The Scottish School never realized that every sensation of the five senses is a perception of a sensible object in the bodily organism; and that touch is a perception, not only of single sensible pressure, but also of double sensible pressure, a perception of our bodily members sensibly pressing and pressed by one another, from which, on the recurrence of a single sensible pressure, we infer the pressure of an external thing for the first time.

  • Hence he concludes that " matter is the name for the sensation-elements derived from both senses, abstracting in thought, so far as possible, from the extension-elements of both " (i.

  • that the evidence of the senses is not a foundation of belief, and then expects us to believe in Nature and in God.

  • In Part II., ch i., he makes three assumptions about the senses, and, without stopping to prove them, or even to make them consistent, deduces from them his thesis that the evidence of the senses is not a foundation of belief in Nature.

  • In no case is the evidence of the senses fallacious or mendacious; the fallacy is in the inference.

  • a tree; so that again the evidence of the senses does not afford trustworthy knowledge of the material universe.

  • There is none in the subsidiary senses, because none of them perceives the pressures exerted on them.

  • Finally, as touch perceives reciprocal pressure within, and tactile inference infers it without, touch is the primary evidence of the senses which is the foundation and logical ground of our belief in Nature as a system of pressing bodies.

  • Balfour, however, having from unproved assumptions denied the evidence of the senses, and the rational power of using them to infer things beyond oneself, has to look out for other, and non-rational, foundations of belief.

  • Such is the modern " Acatalepsia," which arises from denying the evidence of the senses, and from citing the transfigured realism of Spencer instead of the original realism of Aristotle, about whom Balfour speaks as follows: " It would be difficult, perhaps impossible, to sum up our debts to Aristotle.

  • Whether it is guided as much by touch as by smell I cannot safely say; but it appears to me that both senses are used in the action.

  • See Kitto's own work, The Lost Senses (1845); J.

  • This view is opposed to the various systems which regard the mind as a tabula rasa (blank tablet) in which the outside world as it were imprints itself through the senses.

  • Such philosophies are called rationalist or sensationalist according as they lay emphasis specially on the function of reason or that of the senses.

  • Thus the pious Hindu, confronted by the impossibility of obtaining perfect knowledge by the senses or by reason, finds his sole perfection in the contemplation of the infinite (Brahma).

  • "Economy" is used in both senses.

  • Now this is an appeal to the general appearances of objects to the imagination or senses " (iv.

  • geometry) much excels, both in universality and exactness, the loose judgments of the senses and imagination, yet [it] never attains a perfect precision and exactness " (i.

  • Chamois are exceedingly shy; and their senses, especially those of sight and smell, very acute.

  • In large doses the action of digitalis on the circulation causes various cerebral symptoms, such as seeing all objects blue, and various other disturbances of the special senses.

  • The name is probably derived from "badge," device, on account of the marks on the head; or it may be identical with the term separately noticed below, the French blaireau being used in both senses.

  • The word is also used in some technical senses, more immediately resulting from the action of driving something in.

  • In the first of these senses the word is applied to objects ranging from the unworked stone to the pot or the wooden figure, and is thus hardly distinguishable from idolatry.

  • But not all things are intangible which our senses are not subtle enough to detect.

  • So little was the scientific conception of the solar system familiar to Epicurus that he could reproach the astronomers, because their account of an eclipse represented things otherwise than as they appear to the senses, and could declare that the sun and stars were just as large as they seemed to us.

  • Under the influence of his disease, his senses became morbidly torpid, and his imagination morbidly active.

  • He retained the full use of his senses during the paralytic attack, and in July he was sufficiently recovered to renew his old club life and to meditate further journeys.

  • CONFESSOR, in the Christian Church, a word used in the two senses of (I) a person the holy character of whose life and death entitle him or her, in the judgment of the Church, to a peculiar reputation for sanctity, (2) a priest empowered to hear confessions.

  • What he usually aims at is either to record the more or less rapid movements of he ground which we can feel, or the slow but large disturbances which do not appeal to our unaided senses.

  • Other remarkable senses of words were possibly already acclimatized in the language of Arabian Jews or Christians.

  • In deep sleep the threshold-value of the stimuli for the various senses is very greatly raised, rising rapidly during the first hour and a half of sleep, and then declining with gradually decreasing decrements.

  • A remarkable case is well authenticated, where, owing to disease, a young man had lost the use of all the senses save of one eye and of one ear.

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