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  • "How long will you be with us?" he asked.
  • Though I don't agree with the gentleman...
  • Just then the man with the star came and stood before the Wizard.
  • It was called "Ivy Green" because the house and the surrounding trees and fences were covered with beautiful English ivy.
  • Obviously he was still struggling with it.
  • They used to hang in long festoons from our porch, filling the whole air with their fragrance, untainted by any earthy smell; and in the early morning, washed in the dew, they felt so soft, so pure, I could not help wondering if they did not resemble the asphodels of God's garden.
  • Alex had destroyed it then with suspicion and accusations.
  • Communicating feelings with Alex wasn't always easy.
  • The radio had shifted into Christmas mode with one song after another.
  • Alex asked with a grin.
  • We'll have to be careful about that with the new baby.
  • The crowd drew up to the large table, at which sat gray-haired or bald seventy-year-old magnates, uniformed and besashed almost all of whom Pierre had seen in their own homes with their buffoons, or playing boston at the clubs.
  • Alex was doing everything in his power to provide her with all the experiences of a natural mother.
  • Maybe lifting had nothing to do with it.
  • "Later," he said with a grin that summoned the dimple below one eye.
  • He stood and tossed the last bite into his mouth, washing it down with the last of his milk.
  • With so many people at their house, it was fortunate that the weather was warm and dry so they could utilize the courtyard for the children.
  • Jonathan was playing cars with Destiny in the family room floor while Carmen straightened up the clutter left by so many people.
  • Such a pleasant day and evening should have ended with a restful night and happy dreams, but it didn't.
  • They put her through college and it was her intent to stay with them as long as they needed her.
  • In business transactions Alex was frugal with his money, but when it came to his family, he was generous.
  • With his return to work, things at the house shifted to a faster pace.
  • "I'm sorry," she said with a sigh.
  • Destiny stared at her, gray eyes large with wonder.
  • It will be so much fun to work on it with Jonathan and Destiny.
  • "I prefer," he said with a smile.
  • Out playing with Dawn.
  • Do the Sanders know where everything is and what needs to be done with the animals?
  • I told them about a week ago, and I went over it again with them today.
  • "After seven, sleepy head," she said with a smile.
  • With everything going on, Carmen didn't have time to worry about flying, but when they were all sitting at the airport, she finally had time to stew over it.
  • Carmen sat with her hands clutched together tightly as the plane taxied out to the runway.
  • Her dark shining hair was pulled back loosely with bejeweled combs and hung in loose curls down her back.
  • So he moved the cars slowly and with caution.
  • She walked toward it and found the horse tied to a tree and standing motionless, with its head hanging down almost to the ground.
  • It was a big horse, tall and bony, with long legs and large knees and feet.
  • His tail was short and scraggly, and his harness had been broken in many places and fastened together again with cords and bits of wire.
  • She set down the bird-cage and poked the boy with her parasol.
  • "How is Uncle Henry?" she enquired, after a pause during which the horse continued to trot with long, regular strides.
  • I work as well as I sleep, he added, with a laugh.
  • "Yes; with Uncle Henry," she answered.
  • "That was an awful big quake," replied Zeb, with a white face.
  • With a wild neigh of terror the animal fell bodily into the pit, drawing the buggy and its occupants after him.
  • The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.
  • Dorothy was too dazed to say much, but she watched one of Jim's big ears turn to violet and the other to rose, and wondered that his tail should be yellow and his body striped with blue and orange like the stripes of a zebra.
  • "We've got to come to the bottom some time," remarked Zeb, with a deep sigh.
  • They saw a landscape with mountains and plains, lakes and rivers, very like those upon the earth's surface; but all the scene was splendidly colored by the variegated lights from the six suns.
  • They seemed to be falling right into the middle of a big city which had many tall buildings with glass domes and sharp-pointed spires.
  • Jim the horse had seen these spires, also, and his ears stood straight up with fear, while Dorothy and Zeb held their breaths in suspense.
  • Zeb drew back with a shiver.
  • Dorothy kept hold of his hand and followed him, and soon they were both walking through the air, with the kitten frisking beside them.
  • So, with a snort and a neigh and a whisk of his short tail he trotted off the roof into the air and at once began floating downward to the street.
  • Then, remembering the stones that had fallen with them and passed them long before they had reached this place, he answered:
  • The man with the star stood for a time quietly thinking over this speech.
  • In this quake a big crack opened and we fell through--horse and buggy, and all--and the stones got loose and came down with us.
  • The man with the star regarded her with his calm, expressionless eyes.
  • "By the way," said the man with the star, looking steadily at the Sorcerer, "you told us yesterday that there would not be a second Rain of Stones.
  • "Will there be any more Rains?" asked the man with the star.
  • The Prince had listened with attention.
  • "Come with me," said the Prince to him.
  • If two should come out of the sky you might with justice say I was wrong; but unless more than this one appears I will hold that I was right.
  • Were you ever with a circus, brother?
  • With this he caught up two of the piglets and pushed them together, so that the two were one.
  • "No one built them," answered the man with the star.
  • Several Mangaboos came forward with glass spades and dug a hole in the ground.
  • But if you will come with me to one of our folk gardens I will show you the way we grow in the Land of the Mangaboos.
  • Inside the hedge they came upon row after row of large and handsome plants with broad leaves gracefully curving until their points nearly reached the ground.
  • If we keep cool and moist, and meet with no accidents, we often live for five years.
  • "What are you going to do with us?" asked Zeb.
  • Let's pick her while we have the chance, before the man with the star comes back.
  • "If that is so," said the boy, "how could he do that wonderful trick with the nine tiny piglets?"
  • "But I saw the little pigs with my own eyes!" exclaimed Zeb.
  • The little pigs had stood huddled in a group, watching this scene with frightened eyes.
  • The cab-horse, who was browsing near, lifted his head with a sigh.
  • With this he began walking in the air toward the high openings, and Dorothy and Zeb followed him.
  • Following these halls they discovered many small rooms opening from them, and some were furnished with glass benches, tables and chairs.
  • But in the basket-car are some things I would like to keep with me.
  • I agree with you.
  • Then I will decide whether to destroy you with the others or not.
  • The advisors of the Princess did not like this test; but she commanded them to step into the flame and one by one they did so, and were scorched so badly that the air was soon filled with an odor like that of baked potatoes.
  • Once they came near to the enclosed Garden of the Clinging Vines, and walking high into the air looked down upon it with much interest.
  • They knew the kitten, by this time, so they scampered over to where she lay beside Jim and commenced to frisk and play with her.
  • The cab-horse, who never slept long at a time, sat upon his haunches and watched the tiny piglets and the kitten with much approval.
  • "Don't be rough!" he would call out, if Eureka knocked over one of the round, fat piglets with her paw; but the pigs never minded, and enjoyed the sport very greatly.
  • Suddenly they looked up to find the room filled with the silent, solemn-eyed Mangaboos.
  • Here were more of the vegetable people with thorns, and silently they urged the now frightened creatures down the street.
  • I'd kick out with those long legs and iron-shod hoofs.
  • "All right," said the Wizard; "I'm with you, whatever you decide.
  • Jim hastened his lagging steps at this assurance of a quick relief from the dark passage.
  • It was all laid out into lovely lawns and gardens, with pebble paths leading through them and groves of beautiful and stately trees dotting the landscape here and there.
  • None of them were in clusters, such as villages or towns, but each had ample grounds of its own, with orchards and gardens surrounding it.
  • With some difficulty and danger Jim drew the buggy over the loose rocks until he reached the green lawns below, where the paths and orchards and gardens began.
  • It was a pretty place, with vines growing thickly over the broad front porch.
  • The door stood open and a table was set in the front room, with four chairs drawn up to it.
  • "How funny!" exclaimed Dorothy, who with Zeb and the Wizard now stood in the doorway.
  • A peal of merry laughter answered her, and the knives and forks fell to the plates with a clatter.
  • "No! he can kick pretty hard with his heels, and bite a little; but Jim can't 'zactly fight," she replied.
  • The strangers took their seats at the table willingly enough, for they were all hungry and the platters were now heaped with good things to eat.
  • Our greatest Champion, Overman-Anu, once climbed the spiral stairway and fought nine days with the Gargoyles before he could escape them and come back; but he could never be induced to describe the dreadful creatures, and soon afterward a bear caught him and ate him up.
  • The wanders were rather discouraged by this gloomy report, but Dorothy said with a sigh:
  • He had nearly finished this last task when a low growling was suddenly heard and the horse began to jump around and kick viciously with his heels.
  • Dorothy and the buggy had floated slowly down stream with the current of the water, and the others made haste to join her.
  • The Wizard opened his satchel and got out some sticking-plaster with which he mended the cuts Jim had received from the claws of the bears.
  • Dorothy nearly went with them, but she was holding fast to the iron rail of the seat, and that saved her.
  • Below them was a vast space, at the bottom of which was a black sea with rolling billows, through which little tongues of flame constantly shot up.
  • Just above them, and almost on a level with their platform, were banks of rolling clouds which constantly shifted position and changed color.
  • "No place at all," answered the man with the braids; "that is, not recently.
  • "I thought so," said the Wizard, with a sigh.
  • Here, on a broad shelf, were several card-board boxes of various sizes, each tied with cotton cord.
  • "I have no money with me," said the Wizard, evasively.
  • You will notice my braids are tied with yellow, pink, brown, red, green, white and black; but I have no blue ribbons.
  • "What a horrid, savage beast!" exclaimed a piglet; "and after we've been such good friends, too, and played with one another!"
  • "It seems we were mistaken," declared a third, looking at the kitten timorously, "no one with such murderous desires should belong to our party, I'm sure."
  • "And that's just what I shall do if you don't let those little balls of pork alone," said Jim, glaring at the kitten with his round, big eyes.
  • Then he halted, ducked down and began to back up, so that he nearly fell with the buggy onto the others.
  • What's the matter with you, old man?
  • With this speech he bent forward and dragged the buggy up the remaining steps.
  • There were odd wooden houses, with carved wooden flowers in the front yards.
  • They made no sounds at all, either in flying or trying to speak, and they conversed mainly by means of quick signals made with their wooden fingers or lips.
  • The group of these queer creatures which was discovered clustered near the stairs at first remained staring and motionless, glaring with evil eyes at the intruders who had so suddenly appeared in their land.
  • In turn the Wizard and the children, the horse and the kitten, examined the Gargoyles with the same silent attention.
  • Crack! crash! bang! went his iron-shod hoofs against the wooden bodies of the Gargoyles, and they were battered right and left with such force that they scattered like straws in the wind.
  • The others picked themselves up from the ground one by one and quickly rejoined their fellows, so for a moment the horse thought he had won the fight with ease.
  • "Oh, I don't know," purred Eureka, smoothing her ruffled fur with her paw; "we didn't manage to hurt anybody, and nobody managed to hurt us."
  • The space underneath the roof, where they stood, permitted them to see on all sides of the tall building, and they looked with much curiosity at the city spread out beneath them.
  • "Could we fly with them?" asked Dorothy.
  • "Do you see that big rock standing on the hillside yonder?" he continued, pointing with his finger.
  • "No you can't," remarked Jim, with a twinkle in his round eyes.
  • "Well, I'll climb up when I get back, then," said the boy, with a laugh.
  • Eureka clung with her claws to the wooden side of the house and let herself down easily.
  • Eureka quickly followed him, and soon they were all standing together upon the platform, with eight of the much prized wooden wings beside them.
  • Then, with the Wizard's help, he tried to fasten some of the wings to the old cab-horse.
  • The girl sat in the middle of the seat, with Zeb and the Wizard on each side of her.
  • Our friends had a good start and were able to maintain it, for with their eight wings they could go just as fast as could the Gargoyles.
  • But they've been very scarce for a few years and we usually have to be content with elephants or buffaloes, answered the creature, in a regretful tone.
  • Oh, she is sometimes gone for several weeks on her hunting trips, and if we were not tied we would crawl all over the mountain and fight with each other and get into a lot of mischief.
  • The heads of the dragonettes were as big as barrels and covered with hard, greenish scales that glittered brightly under the light of the lanterns.
  • "You may be right," replied the Wizard, "but we're a little particular about associating with strangers.
  • They heard a crunching, grinding sound, a loud snap, and the turn-table came to a stop with its broadest surface shutting off the path from which they had come.
  • "And there is no way to go back," added Zeb, with a low whistle of perplexity.
  • "Were you ever before shut up in a cave, far under the earth, with no way of getting out?" enquired the horse, seriously.
  • "Then you can do a few wizzes and get us out of this hole," declared the tiny one, with much confidence.
  • "For the second time?" asked the Wizard, with great interest.
  • "Where is that Magic Belt?" enquired the Wizard, who had listened with great interest.
  • "Of course; when it is four o'clock," she replied, with a laugh at his startled expression.
  • "Don't worry, dear," Dorothy exclaimed, "I'll hold you in my arms, and take you with me."
  • All I need do is to wish you with me, and there you'll be--safe in the royal palace!
  • Princess Ozma once brought him to life with a witch-powder, when she was a boy.
  • "A sawhorse is a thing they saw boards on," remarked Jim, with a sniff.
  • She had scarcely spoken the words then she suddenly disappeared from the cave, and with her went the kitten.
  • One moment Dorothy sat beside them with the kitten in her lap, and a moment later the horse, the piglets, the Wizard and the boy were all that remained in the underground prison.
  • "And the people will not willingly part with her," added a tall soldier in a Captain-General's uniform.
  • "In that case you are very welcome!" cried all the servants, and it pleased the Wizard to note the respect with which the royal retainers bowed before him.
  • "She is with the Princess Ozma, in the private rooms of the palace," replied Jellia Jamb.
  • The boy looked around him with wondering eyes.
  • It perplexed even Jellia Jamb, for a time, to know what to do with the animal.
  • In the closets he discovered many fancy costumes of rich velvets and brocades, and one of the attendants told him to dress himself in any of the clothes that pleased him and to be prepared to dine with the Princess and Dorothy in an hour's time.
  • One day my balloon ran away with me and brought me across the deserts to this beautiful country.
  • You shall be the Official Wizard of my kingdom, and be treated with every respect and consideration.
  • "He shall amuse us with his tricks tomorrow," said the Princess.
  • I'm very certain, Oz, that you gave me the best brains in the world, for I can think with them day and night, when all other brains are fast asleep.
  • But Ozma soon conquered her, with the help of Glinda the Good, and after that I went to live with Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman.
  • Just then a loud cackling was heard outside; and, when a servant threw open the door with a low bow, a yellow hen strutted in.
  • She nestled herself comfortably in Dorothy's lap until the kitten gave a snarl of jealous anger and leaped up with a sharp claw fiercely bared to strike Billina a blow.
  • The Tin Woodman loved Dorothy most tenderly, and welcomed with joy the return of the little old Wizard.
  • They obeyed at once, and next served a fine large turbot on a silver platter, with drawn gravy poured over it.
  • "Fish!" cried Jim, with a sniff.
  • They soon mixed a tub of oatmeal with a little water, and Jim ate it with much relish.
  • The Sawhorse stopped at the same time and stared at the other with its queer protruding eyes, which were mere knots in the log that formed its body.
  • The ends of the wooden legs were shod with plates of solid gold, and the saddle of the Princess Ozma, which was of red leather set with sparkling diamonds, was strapped to the clumsy body.
  • Jim's eyes stuck out as much as those of the Sawhorse, and he stared at the creature with his ears erect and his long head drawn back until it rested against his arched neck.
  • "I do not doubt it," the Sawhorse observed, with a tone of pride.
  • Ozma sprinkled me with a magic powder, and I just had to live.
  • I know I'm not much account; but I'm the only horse in all the Land of Oz, so they treat me with great respect.
  • "How did you happen to be shod with gold?" he asked.
  • One was an enormous Lion with clear, intelligent eyes, a tawney mane bushy and well kept, and a body like yellow plush.
  • "I'm glad of that," said Jim; "for I, also, have a conscience, and it tells me not to crush in your skull with a blow of my powerful hoof."
  • Just then the girlish Ruler of Oz opened the door and greeted Dorothy with a good-morning kiss.
  • First came the Imperial Cornet Band of Oz, dressed in emerald velvet uniforms with slashes of pea-green satin and buttons of immense cut emeralds.
  • They played the National air called "The Oz Spangled Banner," and behind them were the standard bearers with the Royal flag.
  • Just behind the royal standard-bearers came the Princess Ozma in her royal chariot, which was of gold encrusted with emeralds and diamonds set in exquisite designs.
  • The chariot was drawn on this occasion by the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, who were decorated with immense pink and blue bows.
  • They wore white uniforms with real diamond buttons and played "What is Oz without Ozma" very sweetly.
  • Then came Professor Woggle-Bug, with a group of students from the Royal College of Scientific Athletics.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • "Of course not," added Jim, with a touch of scorn; "those little wooden legs of yours are not half as long as my own."
  • "Then why not race with the Sawhorse?" enquired the Scarecrow.
  • Hearing this apology the Tiger and the Lion stopped lashing their tails and retreated with dignified steps to the side of the Princess.
  • "It's lucky we got here, though," said the boy; and Jim thought of the dark cave, and agreed with him.
  • I want to play with it.
  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.
  • "I won't answer such a foolish question," asserted Eureka, with a snarl.
  • "What shall we do now?" asked the Scarecrow, with a sigh, for such a crime had cast a gloom over all the company.
  • At three o'clock the Throne Room was crowded with citizens, men, women and children being eager to witness the great trial.
  • Princess Ozma, dressed in her most splendid robes of state, sat in the magnificent emerald throne, with her jewelled sceptre in her hand and her sparkling coronet upon her fair brow.
  • "Are you still seeing with your mind's eye?" enquired the Scarecrow.
  • "Justice," remarked the Scarecrow, with a sigh, "is a dangerous thing to meddle with.
  • "I refuse to be free," cried the kitten, in a sharp voice, "unless the Wizard can do his trick with eight piglets.
  • Instead of keeping still, so I could eat him comfortably, he trembled so with fear that he fell off the table into a big vase that was standing on the floor.
  • There was no way to get the creature out without breaking the vase, so the Tin Woodman smashed it with his axe and set the little prisoner free.
  • And now, the trial being over, the good citizens of the Emerald City scattered to their homes, well content with the day's amusement.
  • Then Dorothy wound up Tik-tok and he danced a jig to amuse the company, after which the Yellow Hen related some of her adventures with the Nome King in the Land of Ev.
  • "Greeting her uncle and aunt in Kansas, by this time," returned Ozma, with a smile.
  • Jim was trotting along the well-known road, shaking his ears and whisking his tail with a contented motion.
  • Just ahead of them were the gates of Hugson's Ranch, and Uncle Hugson now came out and stood with uplifted arms and wide open mouth, staring in amazement.
  • "Why, in the world, Uncle," answered Zeb, with a laugh.
  • All were surprised to find that he was not with them.
  • His shoes were covered with mud; he had torn his coat on the thorny tree.
  • "General, you are in danger here," said an officer who was riding with him.
  • "Halt!" he cried to the men who were with him.
  • He leaped into the saddle, and away he dashed with his officers close behind him.
  • With one hand the little boy clung to his sister's arm, and with the other he held his primer.
  • With one hand the little boy clung to his sister's arm, and with the other he held his primer.
  • "Good morning, children!" said the minister; and he kindly shook hands with both.
  • He looked at the bright, yellow pieces and said, "What shall I do with these coppers, mother?"
  • "You might have bought half a dozen such whistles with the money I gave you," said his mother.
  • He was a great thinker and a great doer, and with Washington he helped to make our country free.
  • One dark night James Hogg was on the hilltop with a flock of seven hundred lambs.
  • Sirrah was with him.
  • With his lighted lantern in his hand, he went up and down the rough hills calling for his lambs.
  • There he cared for them with love and kindness; but no word did he speak in their hearing.
  • They played with the lambs in the field and saw no human being but the shepherd.
  • The walls and ceiling glittered with gold and precious gems.
  • The table was decorated with rare and beautiful plants and flowers.
  • The caliph's eyes were filled with tears.
  • The caliph wished you to amuse him with pleasant thoughts, and you have filled his mind with melancholy.
  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.
  • I am with you, and I will not let anything hurt you.
  • Perhaps it will scratch me with its sharp claws.
  • I will choke it with my strong arms.
  • He says she was a monster; and she was running straight toward the hills with a little lamb in her mouth.
  • Soon, with the gun in one hand, he crept back into the cave.
  • Men and boys pulled with all their might; and Putnam and the wolf were drawn out together.
  • The smith went on with his work.
  • He was riding very slowly, and both he and his horse were bespattered with mud.
  • He's one of those country fellows who can sleep in the haymow and eat with the horses.
  • He was dressed plainly, and, with his reddish-brown hair and mud-bespattered face, looked like a hard- working countryman just in from the backwoods.
  • So he went to the other hotel, where he found the vice president sitting with some friends in the parlor.
  • You were so bespattered with mud that I thought you were some old farmer.
  • It was not long until the man came with another present.
  • He agreed to take the boy with him and teach him how to be a good sailor.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • It was the picture of a sheep, and it was drawn so well that the stranger was filled with astonishment.
  • How would you like to live with me, Giotto?
  • The boy's face beamed with delight.
  • Perhaps he will do well with you.
  • So he painted a beautiful picture which seemed to be covered with a curtain.
  • The wreaths were so nearly alike that none of those who were with the king could point out any difference.
  • He remembered that close by his window there was a climbing vine filled with beautiful sweet flowers.
  • The queen was standing quite near to it with the two wreaths still in her hands.
  • Here was her round head, covered with pretty curls.
  • So busy was he with the drawing that he did not think of anything else.
  • He compared it with the baby's pretty face.
  • When Andrew Jackson was a little boy he lived with his mother in South Carolina.
  • "Come with us," they said, "and we will teach you that the king's soldiers are not to be trifled with."
  • Down with you, and clean those boots at once.
  • He drew his sword to hit the boy with its flat side.
  • You are going to Exeter with me.
  • One was Mr. Webster's horse; the other was an old gray nag with a lady's sidesaddle on its back.
  • But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me.
  • With tears in her eyes she went out and stood in the whisperer's place.
  • Each book was written with a pen or a brush.
  • One day when they were with their mother, she showed them a wonderful book that some rich friend had given her.
  • "I am sure I would rather have a good bow with arrows" said Ethelred.
  • But I am a prince, and it is foolish for princes to waste their time with such things.
  • Then, one morning, Alfred went into his mother's room with a smiling, joyous face.
  • Alfred opened it with careful fingers.
  • Then he began with the first word on the first page and read the first story aloud without making one mistake.
  • "You will be a good monk when you grow up," said Ethelred, with a sneer.
  • He knew how to work with his hands.
  • When Cyrus was twelve years old he went with his mother to Media to visit his grandfather.
  • He wished the lad to stay with him in Media.
  • The tables were to be laden with all kinds of food.
  • What will you do with them?
  • He was dressed in the rich uniform of the cupbearer, and he came forward with much dignity and grace.
  • He carried a white napkin upon his arm, and held the cup of wine very daintily with three of his fingers.
  • "Bravo! bravo!" cried his mother, her eyes sparkling with pride.
  • For the other day, when you sat at dinner with your officers, I noticed that the wine made you act queerly.
  • So it was arranged that the boy should travel with a small company of merchants who were going to the same place.
  • He had never heard of a boy with so much money as that.
  • "You are a brave lad to be joking with robbers" said the man; and he also hurried on to a more promising field.
  • Mount your horse, and my own men will ride with you and see that you reach the end of your journey in safety.
  • Although they were rich, they lived simply and were at peace with all the world.
  • He led the great king to his palace and begged that he would dine with him.
  • "Very well, then," said the shah, "stay with me a little while and observe what you can."
  • Then with great labor he began to widen the passageway.
  • But what has the bomb to do with what I wish you to write?
  • These ships were loaded with corn.
  • The rulers of the city met to decide what should be done with the corn.
  • The people of Antium were enemies of the Romans and had often been at war with them.
  • They filled the land with terror.
  • These rulers were old men, with wise faces and long white beards.
  • But he drove them back with scornful words.
  • When he saw his mother and his wife and his children, he was filled with joy.
  • For a long time his mother pleaded with him.
  • When they heard that Arion had a large sum of money with him they began to make plans to get it.
  • You must either jump overboard into the sea or be slain with your own sword.
  • The dolphin carried him with great speed to the nearest shore.
  • He has given you wings with which to fly through the air.
  • And when he had blessed them, all began to sing; and the whole forest was filled with sweetness and joy because of their wonderful melodies.
  • A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop. He was a small man with a large head and long arms.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • So, let us go on with the work that is before us.
  • Then with his strong face aglow in their feeble light, he made a speech in favor of a law to help poor fishermen.
  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
  • He quarreled with the other sailors, and even with the captain.
  • So they filled a small boat with the things that he would need the most--an ax, a hoe, a kettle, and some other things.
  • He talked with some of the sailors.
  • Carl awoke with a start, and came quickly to answer the call.
  • Then his eyes overflowed with tears, and he fell on his knees before the king.
  • I know how you must have been overwearied with long hours of watching.
  • You may send the gold pieces to your mother with my compliments; and tell her that the king will take care of both her and you.
  • He had fought a battle with his enemies, the English.
  • The king himself was obliged to hide in the wild woods while his foes hunted for him with hounds.
  • Sometimes two or three faithful friends were with him.
  • He is now being hunted with hounds, but I hope soon to see him king over all Scotland.
  • "My men have been scattered," said the king, "and therefore, no one is with me."
  • They shall go with you and serve you.
  • They were tall and strong young men, and they gladly promised to go with the king and help him.
  • "Be brave, and defend your king with your lives," said their mother.
  • It tried three times, four times, a dozen times, twenty times--but always with the same result.
  • My wife will be delighted with it.
  • The two boys were there, busily working with hammer and saw.
  • The rod was bent in the middle so that it could be turned as with a crank.
  • When the work was finished, the old fishing boat looked rather odd, with a paddle wheel on each side which dipped just a few inches into the water.
  • He took something like an oarlock from his pocket and fastened it to the stern of the boat; then with a paddle which worked in this oarlock one of the boys could guide the boat while the other turned the paddle wheels.
  • When Robert Fulton became a man, he did not forget his experiment with the old fishing boat.
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • One day a strange merchant came to him with some diamonds and pearls which he had brought from beyond the sea.
  • The caliph was so well pleased with these jewels that he bought them and paid the merchant a large sum of money.
  • He was hot and covered with dust.
  • He turned quickly and saw an eagle rising into the air with his moneybag in its claws.
  • The great bird was high in the air and flying towards the far-off mountains with all his money.
  • But I have met with such bad luck that I am forced to sell them.
  • Then the merchant told him how the eagle had flown away with his money.
  • "Good friend," he said, "if you should find something that we have lost, what would you do with it?"
  • With much hard labor and careful management I have saved only five little silver pieces.
  • Then he rewarded the gardener with ten more pieces for his honesty.
  • The land around it was rugged, with only a few fields in the midst of a vast forest.
  • He soon found a warm corner, and there he lay down, covering himself with the straw.
  • Then Caedmon, with only the cows as his hearers, opened his mouth and began to sing.
  • I will spend all my life, and give all that I have, to lessen the distress and sorrow with which this world seems filled.
  • And in the middle was a rough table with benches around it instead of chairs.
  • He might be seen every day with a bag of charcoal on his back, carrying it to some of his customers.
  • Sometimes he carried three or four bags to the palace where the little king of France lived with his mother.
  • They did so, and as the flames lighted up the room, they saw their father enter with a child in his arms.
  • The two boys, Charlot and Blondel, with wondering eyes watched their father and mother undress the little stranger.
  • His beautiful clothes were soaked with water, and his fine white collar and ruffles were soiled and dripping.
  • "_My little friend!_" said the child with a sneer.
  • The little stranger came and sat with them.
  • In a few minutes the room was filled with gentlemen.
  • This charcoal man, whom I know very well, ran past me with a child in his arms.
  • But I hope you are now ready to come home with us.
  • You may bring mine with you.
  • "They say that King Henry always has a number of men with him," said the boy; "how shall I know which is he?"
  • Do you mean that the one with his hat on will be the king?
  • The fishermen talked in low tones with one another for a little while, and then one said, It's a bargain.
  • So the governor sent a messenger to Delphi to ask the oracle what should be done with the tripod.
  • The governor was much pleased with this answer.
  • So, with his own hands he carried the golden tripod to the little house where Thales lived.
  • "But what shall we do with it?" said the messengers.
  • "We agree with you," said the messengers; "and we present the prize to you because you are the wisest of the wise."
  • When he heard that some men had come to Corinth with a very costly golden tripod, he had them brought before him.
  • By the midpoint of the twentieth century, America's dreamers were preoccupied with the future—and not just any old future, but the great and glorious future that seemed inevitable.
  • I am also a historian with a full understanding of how poverty, disease, ignorance, famine, and war have dominated life on this planet.
  • I make them because I believe I can back them up with convincing proofs and arguments.
  • This viewpoint seems reasonable because it is largely consistent with our everyday experience of life.
  • History is full of radical breaks with the past that only seem to have come out of nowhere but were, in fact, predictable.
  • Because television was radio with pictures, the first television shows were simply men in suits standing in front of microphones reading the news.
  • This tendency to only be able to see new technology as an extension of the old is exactly the phenomena we have seen with the Internet.
  • The mark of these technologies is that they are greeted with universal skepticism at first.
  • Let's say Linda has come up with a pretty interesting idea: A social network for couples.
  • She researches credit card processors and decides to go with PayPal for now.
  • If I had an even faster computer than I have today, I could come up with really interesting questions to ask it.
  • Let's start with a definition.
  • On top of the common-good projects supported with our tax dollars, almost all of us—certainly not just the wealthy—have causes we support.
  • It simply has been enabled by technology combined with prosperity compounded over time.
  • Imagine a thousand new arts, none of which are even invented yet, each with a thousand new great masters.
  • To understand this problem, consider our relationship with knowledge over the centuries.
  • And Croesus was so amazed that he endowed the Oracle at Delphi with all kinds of gifts and planned to run all-important questions by this oracle.
  • Bear with me a little longer.
  • Well, that tells us something new about ourselves—in fact, a lot of things: the kinds of information we want to share, the kinds of information we want to consume, and the immediacy with which we want it all to occur.
  • We are building the Internet to connect with each other better, to share information, to collaborate, to offer mutual support, and so on.
  • Online, people are constantly thinking up new ways to share with others.
  • Probably anonymously, probably with certain controls—but I believe they will share it.
  • What can you do with that?
  • This unique phenomenon will pass as we learn to cope with vast amounts of data.
  • Or to continue with fictional cases: Why does gasoline made from oil refined at one refinery burn more efficiently?
  • In the past, a scientist began with a surmise or hunch and began gathering data to prove or disprove it.
  • To make my case that machines will bring about the end of ignorance, I begin with a company I admire: Amazon.com, the world's largest online retailer.
  • You have picked out a suit, a sharp grey one with barely detectable pinstripes.
  • That includes data you voluntarily provide so that machines make better suggestions, data it learns about you based on its prior interactions with you, and public data taken from the Internet (your age, for instance).
  • Armed with this data, it will suggest different products to me than to you.
  • Once that is achieved, the sort of event that will happen is: You will be online to order, say, a replacement water filter, and the suggestion engine will propose that along with the filter, you might like to buy ... a pogo stick.
  • Then imagine if you shared your Digital Echo with a billion other people on the planet.
  • Imagine what you could do with the combined learning of a quadrillion life experiences.
  • Back in the old days (the 1980s), you only had data—say, the Yellow Pages with its list of restaurants.
  • But you still were working with the biased, anecdotal opinions of a few people not very like you.
  • First, it will consider all your friends, people with whom you have actual intimate relationships, and it will look at where they go for Italian food.
  • The system will weigh heavily the choices of people with Italian last names, and people who own restaurants—all these different factors, millions and millions of factors, all from the passively recorded life experiences of a billion people.
  • It will build a table of all the words used by people like you who have reviewed those restaurants and will look for San Francisco restaurants described with the same words.
  • And my system will come back with a single answer, something like, You should go to Tommaso's on Kearny Street.
  • None of us has the time to do that—but in the future, with my system, wisdom will operate at processor speeds.
  • But I contend that only matters of degree separate it from the weightier matters we conventionally associate with wisdom.
  • We cannot deal with equations that big—but a computer will solve for that in a minute if it has enough data.
  • That brings us back to the need to share data—and to our online example with Amazon, and our offline example with our salesperson.
  • When the salesperson rings up your purchase, no one tells him he had better forget what shoes he sold you with that suit and not to use that information to advise any future clients.
  • And no one is concerned or even notices much, because your association with that data is so removed from you.
  • But that has nothing to do with the anonymous sharing of data.
  • In some twentieth-century science fiction visions of the future, humans created friendly robot sidekicks with data storage capacity and computational speed the human brain lacked.
  • What we do with it has yet to be written.
  • And as with ignorance, we may already have much of the data we need to find solutions.
  • Regarding disorders and disabilities: We should be able to repair, heal, or replace any part of the body not functioning at the level the person with the disability reasonably wishes it to.
  • Is it possible to replace all our organs with freshly grown new ones created from our own cells?
  • In addition, images engraved in walls of what appear to be people infected with polio are found in Egypt dating back to at least 1400 BC.
  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.
  • A few years later, with the United States again at war, most of its top medical minds were engaged in the war effort.
  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
  • This goal is within our grasp—and with the vaccine presently priced at about thirty cents a child, shame on us for not ending polio once and for all.
  • If 500,000,000 is still an inconceivably large number: Imagine a football stadium packed with spectators.
  • Smallpox has been with us for thousands of years.
  • A practitioner took a scab from someone with a mild case, made an incision in the skin of a healthy person, and infected that person with the scab.
  • Sometimes they became infected with other illnesses, and variolation seemed to start entirely new epidemics.
  • An illness with no serious effects on humans, cowpox caused lesions on cows' udders which then could spread to dairymaids' hands.
  • When Jenner did variolations on milkmaids who had had cowpox, they never came down with smallpox.
  • Phipps never came down with smallpox.
  • But with time, technology worked through all these problems.
  • In 1958, with smallpox still killing two million people a year, the World Health Organization pledged to eradicate it.
  • I think that is the case with polio and smallpox, which means they weren't eliminated because they were easy, but because they were awful.
  • If the smallpox and polio successes were achieved in a low-tech world, think how much more we can accomplish with vastly improved tools, infrastructure, and communication.
  • If my reasoning elsewhere in this book is correct, we are moving toward a future where there will be nothing but healthy, well-developed, rich countries with modern infrastructure.
  • Our battles with diseases go as far back into history as we can see.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • In the First World War, we learned to treat wounds by washing them with a germicide.
  • For instance: Imagine all people with skin cancer voluntarily shared their Digital Echo files on an anonymous basis.
  • With skin cancer, like all diseases, over time some people get better and some people get worse, and often we really don't know why.
  • The same happenchance brought us the learning that children in schools with fluorescent lights get fewer cavities than those in schools with incandescent lighting.
  • We also can't hammer nails with our hands, so we invented hammers.
  • Say, for instance, you believe redheads cause more traffic accidents than those with other colors of hair.
  • So you make sure that if your population of redheads had a million people with a certain distribution of age, the distribution in your non-redhead sample is exactly the same.
  • Once this ball gets rolling, it will speed up and, because of it, we will all wake up each morning with a little extra spring in our step and sparkle in our eye.
  • A record of all human activity, with anonymity safeguards in place, will allow us all to become part of the solution by putting our minds to work on the problems of the world.
  • Metallurgy gives us steel with which we can fashion either swords or plowshares.
  • Then the scientific race of the century was on, with this goal: to figure out how DNA conveyed genetic information.
  • (With more than thirty thousand genes in your body, you can't expect them all to have cool names.)
  • By looking at how the genome varies between people with a genetic condition and people without it, we can identify the troublemaking gene.
  • If people with those conditions get better, information about their treatment can be widely shared with those who have the common genetic factors.
  • Diseases are frequently diagnosed with broad terms based on a set of symptoms.
  • What we call "heart disease" will become hundreds of individual conditions each with its own cause and, hopefully, cure.
  • And as we have seen, understanding how we are made is certainly a huge advantage in our battle with disease.
  • Imagine being Jenner and not even knowing you were dealing with microbes.
  • They had so much success with so little.
  • With all due respect to Nietzsche, we have looked long into the Abyss, but the Abyss has not looked back into us.
  • However, new and improved cows are now able to make milk with more of these enzymes.
  • You still worked almost exclusively with people in your lab or at least in your city.
  • With Skype and similar products, you can even see the person you are working with.
  • The power of the Internet and associated technologies we have so far described, combined with our new understanding of the genome, dooms disease to eventual extinction.
  • By taking a block of marble and carving a statue, or taking a handful of seed and growing a cornfield, you have combined your labor and know-how with something of little value and have created something of more value.
  • When you trade with someone in a free market, you are giving up something you have for something the other person has, which you value more.
  • One can imagine two children each with a bag of jelly beans.
  • With each trade he got something he valued more than what he traded away; and presumably all the people he traded with along the way also increased their value with each trade.
  • With each trade he got something he valued more than what he traded away; and presumably all the people he traded with along the way also increased their value with each trade.
  • This is a good thing because it means that high degrees of utility (the economists' word for "happiness") can be achieved with a wide variety of goods.
  • It is safe to say that the man with seventeen puppies is creating more happiness by giving one each to sixteen friends than he is forgoing by his loss of puppies.
  • Even with this technology called money, trade has been difficult.
  • Etsy allows people to trade their crafts, items they have made with their own hands and materials.
  • With the rapid flow of information about businesses and their products, along with the ease of "checking up" on a vendor, good businesses will get more business and push out the bad ones.
  • With the rapid flow of information about businesses and their products, along with the ease of "checking up" on a vendor, good businesses will get more business and push out the bad ones.
  • In the past, when most media was mass media, it was essential to create products with mass appeal.
  • Once someone knows how to make a factory that can produce 48,000 pins a day with ten people, someone else can figure out how to make one that makes 100,000 a day with five people.
  • Or five million a day with no people.
  • But for now, I want to leave you with a preposterous thought: In the future, a new Mercedes Benz will cost just $50.
  • And yet we do have some experience with situations where scarcity is nonexistent.
  • We know how to power a clock with this energy but haven't yet cracked the code on doing it at scale.
  • I believe this is the case with energy.
  • And like our example with energy, technology and human innovation could make other things that are now scarce—or that we think of now as scarce—not so at all.
  • We compute the maximum amount of food the world can produce by beginning with total acres of land considered arable, but that is based on assumptions about the future of technology and agriculture.
  • He explained to me that with a lawnmower, one person would be able to do the job and eleven men would be unemployed.
  • Technological advances that displace human workers are similar in effect to two other concepts with which we are very familiar in the modern age: outsourcing and free trade.
  • Both of these have political implications, and so it is with some hesitation I bring them up.
  • One person with a horse and a cotton gin could process as much as fifty people without the gin.
  • They are able to produce widgets for ten cents, putting the Dollar Widget Company (with its unfortunate name) out of business.
  • You, personally, are pretty happy with the generic knockoff, which saves you a dollar and tastes the same to you.
  • Clearly, from a "big picture" standpoint, you should stick with the Oreos.
  • Have I convinced you that replacing people with machines frees people from the bondage of doing machine work?
  • Humanity augmented with technology will lead to ever-increasing productivity.
  • Seeing Scooby-Doo in cartoons doesn't change our expectations of canine behavior because we have so much experience with real dogs.
  • But what if dogs didn't exist and your only experience with them was watching Scooby-Doo?
  • When you imagined dogs being "invented" in the future, you would naturally imagine having conversations with them.
  • It is altogether possible that many people would want to have conversations with their dogs mainly because they regard their dogs as sentient.
  • But I know of no one who would want to have a conversation with a computer program pretending to be his dog.
  • But in terms of wanting to converse with robots at an emotional level, I just don't see it.
  • I might enjoy that kind of banter with a real person I will never meet, talking to me from a distant state.
  • But that's because I would be sharing the experience with another human being, and human beings form connections with other human beings.
  • Artificial surrogates for human companionship are always vastly inferior to the real thing; we crave connections with people, not machines.
  • So, spare me your cute robots with human names.
  • The robots I watched making Legos had no human operators because no human can keep up with them.
  • Generally defined, nanotechnology is the field concerned with creating machines along the scale of a nanometer, a billionth of a meter.
  • Similarly, they require little power, so they either can be powered cheaply or can power themselves from their environment, with a little heat or sunlight.
  • Choose whichever of those you are comfortable with, but let me illustrate with a single example.
  • The vaccine nanoparticles are painted with a protein that helps keep the white blood cells from attacking the pancreas without damaging the overall immune system.
  • In the future, we will paint surfaces with substances full of nanites that will absorb sunlight and turn it into electricity, transforming any object we paint into a clean energy creator.
  • As much as I would like to continue with speculations about molecular-sized machines, I have a larger thesis to prove.
  • I branched off into this discussion of robots and nanites to give an idea of the kinds of massive gains in efficiency with declining costs.
  • If we obtained this ten-thousand-fold increase simply by allowing specialization and dividing work up among people, then what astronomical gains will we achieve by outsourcing that work to robots capable of working with unimaginable precision at unimaginable speed?
  • These fields are about to explode with innovation and advancement.
  • Please bear with me and keep your mind open for a minute longer.
  • Fifteen years later, I got a computer with 4,000K (or 4MB) of memory, one thousand times the memory of my trusty VIC-20.
  • But that won't happen with the Mercedes.
  • In the past two centuries with very little technology, we've come from whale oil and wood to solar and nuclear.
  • Imagine what we can do in the future with a thousand times more technological advancement.
  • This pan's nanite coating means to clean it, you just wipe it with a nanite rag that doesn't stain.
  • Look how far we have come in creating prosperity with almost no technology for so long.
  • A poor person with a six-year-old car today has more wealth than a poor person with a six-year-old car did back in 1911, for the simple reason that cars are so much better now.
  • A poor person with free access to the Internet at the library is wealthier than a poor person with free access to just a library.
  • It is a tale that history repeats with surprising consistency.
  • Three centuries later, it became a hereditary right and came with a daily ration of two pounds of bread ("Hey, you don't expect us to cook the free grain, do you?") and occasionally included meat, olive oil, and salt.
  • What's wrong with that?
  • But think of it this way: Before, you made $33,000 and paid 40 percent in taxes, so you were left with $20,000 in take-home pay.
  • After your raise, you made $1 million, paid $600,000 in taxes, and were left with $400,000—twenty times more after-tax income.
  • Most people would not term that welfare, which has become a loaded phrase associated with the state making a payment to individuals.
  • Is there anything wrong with you collecting this dividend check for which you did no work at all?
  • It was theirs to do with as they pleased and they chose to give it to you.
  • Bill Gates could make his billions because computers, with the right software, could vastly increase productivity.
  • We see with our eyes many people doing mind-numbingly boring jobs and assume that is all they are capable of doing.
  • It may seem intuitive at first glance, this idea that somehow there are only so many jobs and if you replace people with machines, people have fewer jobs.
  • But upon reflection, it is entirely inconsistent with our experience.
  • In this world, humans have grown fat, stopped walking, and fill their days with non-stop entertainment and food.
  • Imagine if all the people with boring, dead-end machine jobs were told they never had to work another day in their life at a job they did not like.
  • But I am not talking about a state of affairs where overnight someone with a "machine job" gets unlimited wealth.
  • Often when I discuss this idea with people, they bring up an objection I have come to call The Spoiled Rich Kid Problem.
  • I don't think so, and I'll explain why with another thought experiment.
  • One day, a tornado comes, lifts up your trailer with everyone in it, flies it around the world to the poorest nation on earth, and drops it in the middle of the village.
  • As technology enters its explosive period of growth, with the Internet and associated technologies flourishing in a Moore's-Law-like manner, it will create immense amounts of wealth.
  • By comparison, if a country has 99 percent of the people working in agriculture—if it is barely feeding itself, even with everyone working at that—then it is living at a subsistence level, the very definition of poverty.
  • It is fascinating reading to this day because the things he notes about the American character are still very much with us.
  • To see how governments have tried (with limited success) to address poverty and hunger, consider the history of England.
  • The system was revised in the 1830s because it was viewed as discouraging work by interfering with the laws of supply and demand relating to labor.
  • The theory was that life in the workhouse had to be worse than life outside the workhouse, otherwise it would be overrun with the poor.
  • And that doesn't even count the many other charitable organizations that have not filed for this tax-exempt status with the federal government.
  • In addition, how food affects us unquestionably has a lot to do with genetic factors, and because everyone has a different genetic makeup, different foods affect each of us differently.
  • Start with India, which has more chronically hungry people than any other country.
  • Next comes China, with the second highest number of hungry people at 130.4 million.
  • Pakistan has the third largest number of hungry people with a total of 43.4 million.
  • Nations with high percentages of hungry citizens are not universally food exporters, and we will explore this more later.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • After all, China grows more than three times the amount of food we do in the United States, with less land under cultivation.
  • Those who argue they should not say there is no way for poor countries to compete with mechanized Western farming and the extremely high yields it produces.
  • In that case, they have to compete with rich, high-tech, government-subsidized industries.
  • Say the poor decide they cannot compete with a modern farm, so they move to the city and get a job at a factory.
  • During the Great Depression in the United States, many unemployed Americans simply left the city and went back to farm life, sometimes living with relatives.
  • An iron plow comes three thousand years later in 500 BC, along with intensive row cultivation.
  • Many of the people Borlaug worked with at this time were poor, even starving.
  • To further enhance yield, at the same time Borlaug bred wheat strains with short, stubby stalks, which were able to better handle more weight of grain.
  • Consider for a moment how much Borlaug accomplished with almost no technology.
  • He had no way to collaborate with scientists in other places, no Internet, and no library.
  • He would pollinate a wheat stalk, then cover it with a trash bag to prevent contamination by other plants.
  • He noticed that when he bred a tall one with a short one, sometimes he got tall offspring and sometimes a short offspring.
  • He then noticed that when he bred short ones with short ones, he always got short ones.
  • Then he noticed when he bred tall pea plants with another tall plant, he occasionally got a short offspring, but usually tall ones.
  • (We see this same principle with different breeds of dogs.
  • One guy from Iowa came along with some garbage bags and saved a billion lives.
  • How much more should we be able to with the Internet, computers, and other technology?
  • The farm of today already has tractors that use GPS to make perfectly parallel rows with great precision.
  • But the food would not only be produced with maximum efficiency; it would be extremely fresh and very healthy.
  • Instead, it is a large, open-air farm with a robot assigned to make each turnip be all that it can be.
  • How do I reconcile my personal choices with my statement that the farm of the future is a good thing?
  • Every morning before I went to school I had chores to do, which began with mixing up the formula and feeding the calves.
  • If you are not familiar with this whole issue, look into it; it is fascinating and, I think, important.
  • Let me start with a few caveats.
  • In a recent survey, only a quarter of Americans answered that question with a "yes."
  • A neighboring farmer and cat-lover, William Ross, perhaps hearing a distinct "ka-ching" in his head, got one of the kittens and teamed up with a geneticist and began a careful breeding program.
  • Over the next three years, forty-two folded-ear cats were born, and with them a new breed.
  • Or are packed with vitamins.
  • As far as scientific advancements go, that would be right up there with the proverbial sliced bread.
  • Remember my earlier statement that a farmer treats a thousand acres of corn as a single entity because it is not cost effective to deal with each corn stalk separately?
  • And advances in drip irrigation, which itself isn't exactly new but is becoming far more widespread and ever more efficient, allows crops to be grown with massively less water.
  • When a promising new finding emerges, that information will be shared with other farms and those techniques will be tested there.
  • Cheap sensors, cloud computing, self-teaching algorithms with feedback loops and sufficient cycles to test a large number of techniques.
  • This has been a common situation throughout areas with high degrees of poverty and is certainly the case in Ethiopia.
  • The farmers, with these contracts in hand, can plant aggressively knowing they have a ready buyer at a fixed price.
  • Especially democracies with free presses.
  • One of these is micro-lending, which directly connects the lender with the borrower and which the Internet has made appealingly easy and personal.
  • With the help of local agencies around the world that have experience in micro-loans, a would-be borrower—say, a fish seller in the Philippines—uploads a picture and an explanation of what she wants the loan for.
  • But in the meantime, hunger will stay with us even in the world of plenty.
  • I agree with them.
  • Rights do not mean much, he reasoned, to those with an "empty stomach, shirtless back, roofless dwellings ... unemployment and poverty, no education or medical attention."
  • If you have a problem with that, take it up with the man with the gun.
  • China pulled out all the stops, dividing its farmland into about twenty-five thousand collective farms with an average of five thousand households each.
  • And the great tragedy is: During these three years, China exported more than twelve million tons of grain along with a literal cornucopia of other agricultural products.
  • If people were permanently obsessed with food, all individual thought, all capacity to argue, even people's sex drive, would disappear.
  • In the United States, you could do it via the tax code, with government only acting as an income redistribution agent but not as a food distributor.
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • But over time, as incomes around the world rise, people will migrate more and more to products associated with social practices that match their own ideals.
  • With information, we will distribute better.
  • With satellites images, we will plan better.
  • With communications, we will grow more efficient.
  • Now, I'm faced with explaining why the past was full of war but somehow the future will not be.
  • Do not expect this to be a uniformly reassuring journey; it may be more of a roller-coaster ride with some rather bleak descents.
  • Something akin to getting a date with Miss America: Sure, in theory, possible—but realistically, it ain't gonna happen.
  • I outline forty-five different ways this will happen—surely enough that even if you don't agree with them all, you will still have plenty of reason to be optimistic.
  • For they cut the cheeks of the males with a sword, so that before they receive the nourishment of milk they must learn to endure wounds.
  • We are replacing monarchy with self-rule.
  • The end of "Off with his head."
  • Courts of law are now the norm in the world, with laws being democratically established and widely published.
  • Maybe you think the British ban on fox hunting with dogs is ridiculous.
  • The point is that it is now illegal in every state, with Louisiana being the last to outlaw it in 2008.
  • Albert Einstein reflected this when he famously said, "I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones."
  • I will not advise getting in touch with our feelings or even group hugs.
  • This is not me fighting against the tide of history but being swept along with it.
  • (Yes, I know that statement should earn the "Screamingly Obvious Statement of the Year Award," but bear with me.)
  • People in a small town in Alabama, a small city in Algeria, and a large city in Argentina all desire different forms of governments with different services.
  • When the Soviet Union dissolved only two years later, not with a bang but with a whimper, we were slack-jawed with surprise.
  • You could have the libertarian state, the green state, the clothing-optional state, the state with free public housing for all, the state where puns are outlawed, the state with a two-drink minimum, the fiercely pro-business state—even a state that guarantees free speech but requires that you sing your speech like a show tune.
  • That is exactly what happens, again and again, with unspeakable results: dead bodies by the millions, each someone's child, and millions more mutilated.
  • We raise children to play with war toys.
  • We will begin with the economic factors I believe will help end war, eleven in all.
  • Young boys compete with other boys in sports and races and tug-of-wars and, well, in everything, because that is simply how they are wired.
  • It is this combined with the fact that their targets, too, are worth more; the cost of rebuilding a modern city today dwarfs the cost of rebuilding that city fifty years ago.
  • One can only assume it would be substantially more if it were to be leveled with a nuclear device.
  • I find MAD a disturbing strategy and see problems with it.
  • The seventeenth-century Spanish writer Baltasar Gracián once offered this advice: "Never contend with a man who has nothing to lose."
  • American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well.
  • (Not to mention the fact that, if the stuff all hits the fan, widget factories like yours would almost certainly be marked with bull's-eyes on the enemy's aerial bombing maps.)
  • At the end of their day, the loan is repaid with a slight bit of interest.
  • Asymmetry will become more pronounced in the future, and we will either endure it, sacrifice individual liberty to prevent it, or come up with a new solution presently hidden from us.
  • Monarchies with any real, significant power are just waiting out the clock.
  • Not only are we eliminating historically warlike forms of government, we are replacing them with peaceful ones, namely democracy.
  • The theory is that democracies do not go to war with other democracies.
  • If you think about it, it is hard to come up with an exception.
  • In World War II, the United States went to war with Germany, Italy, and Japan, a trio of undemocratic countries.
  • With Britain in the war, its colonies and dominions joined in as well.
  • By the end of the month, Japan, bound by treaty with Great Britain, declared war on Germany.
  • Unless one can somehow imagine NATO countries going to war with each other, such as Belgium invading the United Kingdom, it is hard to see how "world wars" could escalate outside of NATO member countries.
  • If NATO is responsible for the bulk of the world's military spending and NATO no longer has the stomach for full-on war with modern states, then large-scale war seems less likely.
  • Tiny countries willing to engage in free trade with their neighbors can prosper.
  • It is a completely viable state, with a ski museum and a McDonald's.
  • This was fine with Great Britain but not with Maine.
  • As the number of touch points with other countries rises, so must our shared understanding of acceptable conduct.
  • While diplomats create treaties, technologists help with their enforcement.
  • With these powers should come enormous checks and balances on their use.
  • The demise of war will be hastened when every impulse to war is regarded, at least initially, with a healthy measure of distrust.
  • The weak group could fight and lose, or comply with whatever the strong group demanded.
  • James Dean is locked in our minds with a cigarette.
  • It was a huge shift in public opinion in which no group benefited financially; if anything, financial interests were aligned against this change, just as with tobacco.
  • Pause, just for a moment, and consider how profound a force for peace this is: to be able to communicate with anyone, anywhere, instantly.
  • More precisely, it catalogues and tracks them and then allows you to communicate with them easily.
  • Seldom will one decide that war with a friend's nation is the only recourse.
  • Friedman goes on to point out that almost anywhere in the world today, it would be impossible to get away with this fraud.
  • Governments in the past could lie with impunity.
  • But along with wealth, these technologies bring information and thereby sow the seeds of their undoing.
  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.
  • The National Security Agency even has a website with a section called CryptoKids for "America's Future Codemakers & Codebreakers."
  • But if the argument is that people demonstrating for free elections or civil liberties or other forms of rights is bad, then that is simply siding with the tyrant against the people.
  • Their revolution was not made up of a bunch of hotheads with torches and pitchforks.
  • Enabling people to communicate in a method with which their governments cannot interfere is a force for freedom and peace.
  • As education rises, a thousand other things rise with it: income, health, political engagement, and an overall concern for world affairs.
  • With money, you can buy machinery or hire workers to do your work.
  • And with every passing year, more people have visited more places.
  • We should totally go to war with them.
  • The world is developing a shared popular culture with elements drawn from around the globe.
  • In an era when cameras were cumbersome and the number of channels on TV could be counted on one hand with enough fingers left over to snap, very little video of any kind was seen.
  • Now, instead of just intellectually engaging with the news, we feel the government brutality, we experience the war, we are electrified by the demonstrations, and we are horrified at the suffering.
  • We will have ended war with an honorable peace.
  • Baz Luhrmann's hip version of Romeo + Juliet with Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes.
  • Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado about Nothing and Julie Taymor's The Tempest with Helen Mirren.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • The implication was that Castor and Pollux, knowing of the imminent collapse of the roof, had come calling with the purpose of saving Simonides's life as their payment for the poem.
  • But with rare exceptions, we simply don't train our brains to do this particular task.
  • So in the present and future, when a technology comes along that represents such a change—that saves details of our activities with which to advise us later, or has us speaking to machines as if they were creatures—it will simply be more of the same.
  • It turns out that, even when doing what you love, both passion and profit matter—but that particular piece of wisdom came later with age.
  • We embarked on these car projects with grandiose visions, many as unrealistic as they were ingenious.
  • The title of Ralph Nader's book was right: That car was Unsafe at Any Speed, at least with the master cylinder removed.
  • It just happens to be the case with old cars.
  • Well, that seems riddled with pitfalls.
  • Moore's Law works because many thousands of people compete with each other to drive technology forward.
  • More minds are thinking about more problems, coming up with better solutions.
  • Having said all of that, government should certainly be watched with a suspicious eye, for it could conceivably delay or derail our ascent to the next golden age.
  • When confronted with any thorny societal problem, I apply the same basic thought process I used on the five topics of this book.
  • But a world without want and without disease, a world with opportunity for all, is a world where getting along—even when we don't see eye to eye—is going to be a good bit easier.
  • This book began with the assertion that it is the optimists who get things done.
  • I look for the day when a billion planets are populated with a billion people each.
  • It is consistent with all we know of the past, which is progress and prosperity.
  • It is with a kind of fear that I begin to write the history of my life.
  • It was completely covered with vines, climbing roses and honeysuckles.
  • One brief spring, musical with the song of robin and mocking-bird, one summer rich in fruit and roses, one autumn of gold and crimson sped by and left their gifts at the feet of an eager, delighted child.
  • Soon I felt the need of some communication with others and began to make crude signs.
  • I knew by the way my mother and aunt dressed when they were going out, and I invariably begged to go with them.
  • Standing before the mirror, as I had seen others do, I anointed mine head with oil and covered my face thickly with powder.
  • I had noticed that my mother and my friends did not use signs as I did when they wanted anything done, but talked with their mouths.
  • One big gobbler snatched a tomato from me one day and ran away with it.
  • We were sadly in the way, but that did not interfere with our pleasure in the least.
  • One was black as ebony, with little bunches of fuzzy hair tied with shoestrings sticking out all over her head like corkscrews.
  • The other was white, with long golden curls.
  • Belle, our dog, my other companion, was old and lazy and liked to sleep by the open fire rather than to romp with me.
  • She kept pounding on the door, while I sat outside on the porch steps and laughed with glee as I felt the jar of the pounding.
  • This was my first great sorrow--my first personal experience with death.
  • I knew that I had ceased to be my mother's only darling, and the thought filled me with jealousy.
  • I guarded both doll and cradle with the most jealous care; but once I discovered my little sister sleeping peacefully in the cradle.
  • His methods had probably died with him; and if they had not, how was a little girl in a far-off town in Alabama to receive the benefit of them?
  • I made friends with many people on the train.
  • His punch, with which he let me play, was a delightful toy.
  • It was the most comical shapeless thing, this improvised doll, with no nose, mouth, ears or eyes--nothing that even the imagination of a child could convert into a face.
  • I pointed this out to everybody with provoking persistency, but no one seemed equal to the task of providing the doll with eyes.
  • I tumbled off the seat and searched under it until I found my aunt's cape, which was trimmed with large beads.
  • But my teacher had been with me several weeks before I understood that everything has a name.
  • This thought, if a wordless sensation may be called a thought, made me hop and skip with pleasure.
  • We walked down the path to the well-house, attracted by the fragrance of the honeysuckle with which it was covered.
  • That was because I saw everything with the strange, new sight that had come to me.
  • Then my eyes filled with tears; for I realized what I had done, and for the first time I felt repentance and sorrow.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that mother, father, sister, teacher were among them--words that were to make the world blossom for me, "like Aaron's rod, with flowers."
  • I did nothing but explore with my hands and learn the name of every object that I touched; and the more I handled things and learned their names and uses, the more joyous and confident grew my sense of kinship with the rest of the world.
  • She linked my earliest thoughts with nature, and made me feel that "birds and flowers and I were happy peers."
  • The shade was grateful, and the tree was so easy to climb that with my teacher's assistance I was able to scramble to a seat in the branches.
  • A shiver ran through the tree, and the wind sent forth a blast that would have knocked me off had I not clung to the branch with might and main.
  • I clung to her, trembling with joy to feel the earth under my feet once more.
  • The mere thought filled me with terror.
  • I had made many mistakes, and Miss Sullivan had pointed them out again and again with gentle patience.
  • Whenever anything delighted or interested me she talked it over with me just as if she were a little girl herself.
  • What many children think of with dread, as a painful plodding through grammar, hard sums and harder definitions, is to-day one of my most precious memories.
  • I cannot explain the peculiar sympathy Miss Sullivan had with my pleasures and desires.
  • Perhaps it was the result of long association with the blind.
  • She went quickly over uninteresting details, and never nagged me with questions to see if I remembered the day-before-yesterday's lesson.
  • All my early lessons have in them the breath of the woods--the fine, resinous odour of pine needles, blended with the perfume of wild grapes.
  • Oh, the delight with which I gathered up the fruit in my pinafore, pressed my face against the smooth cheeks of the apples, still warm from the sun, and skipped back to the house!
  • She made raised maps in clay, so that I could feel the mountain ridges and valleys, and follow with my fingers the devious course of rivers.
  • I remember the eagerness with which I made discoveries about them.
  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.
  • I was persuaded, however, to content myself with the gifts from the tree and leave the others until morning.
  • At last I fell asleep with a new doll and a white bear in my arms.
  • Next morning it was I who waked the whole family with my first "Merry Christmas!"
  • But when my teacher presented me with a canary, my cup of happiness overflowed.
  • Every morning after breakfast I prepared his bath, made his cage clean and sweet, filled his cups with fresh seed and water from the well-house, and hung a spray of chickweed in his swing.
  • As if it were yesterday I remember the preparations, the departure with my teacher and my mother, the journey, and finally the arrival in Boston.
  • She was covered with dirt – the remains of mud pies I had compelled her to eat, although she had never shown any special liking for them.
  • We had scarcely arrived at the Perkins Institution for the Blind when I began to make friends with the little blind children.
  • What joy to talk with other children in my own language!
  • I remember the surprise and the pain I felt as I noticed that they placed their hands over mine when I talked to them and that they read books with their fingers.
  • One day spent with the blind children made me feel thoroughly at home in my new environment, and I looked eagerly from one pleasant experience to another as the days flew swiftly by.
  • How my childish imagination glowed with the splendour of their enterprise!
  • I was keenly surprised and disappointed years later to learn of their acts of persecution that make us tingle with shame, even while we glory in the courage and energy that gave us our "Country Beautiful."
  • It was hard, smooth sand, very different from the loose, sharp sand, mingled with kelp and shells, at Brewster.
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • So my little heart leaped high with eager excitement when I knew that my wish was at last to be realized.
  • The buoyant motion of the water filled me with an exquisite, quivering joy.
  • The waves seemed to be playing a game with me, and tossed me from one to another in their wild frolic.
  • The tang of the untainted, fresh and free sea air was like a cool, quieting thought, and the shells and pebbles and the seaweed with tiny living creatures attached to it never lost their fascination for me.
  • It suddenly occurred to me that he might make a delightful pet; so I seized him by the tail with both hands and carried him home.
  • In the autumn I returned to my Southern home with a heart full of joyous memories.
  • I spent the autumn months with my family at our summer cottage, on a mountain about fourteen miles from Tuscumbia.
  • The opening was filled with ferns which completely covered the beds of limestone and in places hid the streams.
  • Here were great oaks and splendid evergreens with trunks like mossy pillars, from the branches of which hung garlands of ivy and mistletoe, and persimmon trees, the odour of which pervaded every nook and corner of the wood--an illusive, fragrant something that made the heart glad.
  • Round the house was a wide piazza, where the mountain winds blew, sweet with all wood-scents.
  • At last the men mounted, and, as they say in the old songs, away went the steeds with bridles ringing and whips cracking and hounds racing ahead, and away went the champion hunters "with hark and whoop and wild halloo!"
  • We always returned to the cottage with armfuls of laurel, goldenrod, ferns and gorgeous swamp-flowers such as grow only in the South.
  • Sometimes I would go with Mildred and my little cousins to gather persimmons.
  • Suddenly Mildred pointed with her little hand and exclaimed, "There's the trestle!"
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • With the utmost difficulty we regained the track.
  • Once I went on a visit to a New England village with its frozen lakes and vast snow fields.
  • The birds had flown, and their empty nests in the bare trees were filled with snow.
  • All the roads were hidden, not a single landmark was visible, only a waste of snow with trees rising out of it.
  • But during the night the fury of the wind increased to such a degree that it thrilled us with a vague terror.
  • For one wild, glad moment we snapped the chain that binds us to earth, and joining hands with the winds we felt ourselves divine!
  • I was pleased with anything that made a noise and liked to feel the cat purr and the dog bark.
  • This feeling began to agitate me with a vexing, forward-reaching sense of a lack that should be filled.
  • Mrs. Lamson had scarcely finished telling me about this girl's success before I was on fire with eagerness.
  • Only such a one can appreciate the eagerness with which I talked to my toys, to stones, trees, birds and dumb animals, or the delight I felt when at my call Mildred ran to me or my dogs obeyed my commands.
  • All teachers of the deaf know what this means, and only they can at all appreciate the peculiar difficulties with which I had to contend.
  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
  • One who reads or talks to me spells with his hand, using the single-hand manual alphabet generally employed by the deaf.
  • My eyes fill with tears now as I think how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence.
  • Mr. Anagnos was delighted with "The Frost King," and published it in one of the Perkins Institution reports.
  • I have never played with words again for the mere pleasure of the game.
  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.
  • At the time I was writing "The Frost King," and this letter, like many others, contains phrases which show that my mind was saturated with the story.
  • In a composition which I wrote about the old cities of Greece and Italy, I borrowed my glowing descriptions, with variations, from sources I have forgotten.
  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.
  • Likewise my compositions are made up of crude notions of my own, inlaid with the brighter thoughts and riper opinions of the authors I have read.
  • Mr. Anagnos states that he cast his vote with those who were favourable to me.
  • The summer and winter following the "Frost King" incident I spent with my family in Alabama.
  • I recall with delight that home-going.
  • It was with the hope of restoring my self-confidence that she persuaded me to write for the Youth's Companion a brief account of my life.
  • I recall with unmixed delight those days when a thousand childish fancies became beautiful realities.
  • The captain showed me Columbus's cabin and the desk with an hour-glass on it.
  • Mr. Higinbotham, President of the World's Fair, kindly gave me permission to touch the exhibits, and with an eagerness as insatiable as that with which Pizarro seized the treasures of Peru, I took in the glories of the Fair with my fingers.
  • Dr. Bell went everywhere with us and in his own delightful way described to me the objects of greatest interest.
  • Mr. Irons also read with me Tennyson's "In Memoriam."
  • Before the end of the first year I read "Wilhelm Tell" with the greatest delight.
  • I studied it with Madame Olivier, a French lady who did not know the manual alphabet, and who was obliged to give her instruction orally.
  • I hung about the dangerous frontier of "guess," avoiding with infinite trouble to myself and others the broad valley of reason.
  • The two years in New York were happy ones, and I look back to them with genuine pleasure.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • The thought of going to college took root in my heart and became an earnest desire, which impelled me to enter into competition for a degree with seeing and hearing girls, in the face of the strong opposition of many true and wise friends.
  • Of course my instructors had had no experience in teaching any but normal pupils, and my only means of conversing with them was reading their lips.
  • I had had, moreover, a good start in French, and received six months' instruction in Latin; but German was the subject with which I was most familiar.
  • For a while, indeed, I had to copy my Latin in braille, so that I could recite with the other girls.
  • Each day Miss Sullivan went to the classes with me and spelled into my hand with infinite patience all that the teachers said.
  • We read together, "As You Like It," Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with America," and Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson."
  • My mind stirred with the stirring times, and the characters round which the life of two contending nations centred seemed to move right before me.
  • I lived with several others in one of the pleasant houses connected with the school, the house where Mr. Howells used to live, and we all had the advantage of home life.
  • So Mildred stayed with me in Cambridge, and for six happy months we were hardly ever apart.
  • If I passed with higher credit in the preliminaries than in the finals, there are two reasons.
  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
  • Mr. Gilman sent my written work to the examiners with a certificate that I, candidate No. 233, had written the papers.
  • This encouraged me greatly, and I sped on to the end of the ordeal with a light heart and a steady hand.
  • But during the first few weeks I was confronted with unforeseen difficulties.
  • I could not follow with my eyes the geometrical figures drawn on the blackboard, and my only means of getting a clear idea of them was to make them on a cushion with straight and curved wires, which had bent and pointed ends.
  • The embossed books and other apparatus arrived, and I threw myself into the work with renewed confidence.
  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
  • I did not like his plan, for I wished to enter college with my class.
  • Miss Sullivan and I spent the rest of the winter with our friends, the Chamberlins in Wrentham, twenty-five miles from Boston.
  • He explained each time what I did not understand in the previous lesson, assigned new work, and took home with him the Greek exercises which I had written during the week on my typewriter, corrected them fully, and returned them to me.
  • Mr. Vining was a stranger to me, and could not communicate with me, except by writing braille.
  • The proctor was also a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way.
  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.
  • I began my studies with eagerness.
  • The lecture-halls seemed filled with the spirit of the great and the wise, and I thought the professors were the embodiment of wisdom.
  • But in college there is no time to commune with one's thoughts.
  • When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures--solitude, books and imagination--outside with the whispering pines.
  • With this machine movable type shuttles can be used, and one can have several shuttles, each with a different set of characters--Greek, French, or mathematical, according to the kind of writing one wishes to do on the typewriter.
  • With this machine movable type shuttles can be used, and one can have several shuttles, each with a different set of characters--Greek, French, or mathematical, according to the kind of writing one wishes to do on the typewriter.
  • Again and again I ask impatiently, "Why concern myself with these explanations and hypotheses?"
  • They fly hither and thither in my thought like blind birds beating the air with ineffectual wings.
  • Ah, here they are--the mixed metaphors mocking and strutting about before me, pointing to the bull in the china shop assailed by hailstones and the bugbears with pale looks, an unanalyzed species!
  • While my days at Radcliffe were still in the future, they were encircled with a halo of romance, which they have lost; but in the transition from romantic to actual I have learned many things I should never have known had I not tried the experiment.
  • Such knowledge floods the soul unseen with a soundless tidal wave of deepening thought.
  • The hammock was covered with pine needles, for it had not been used while my teacher was away.
  • The air was balmy, with a tang of the sea in it.
  • I took the book in my hands and tried to feel the letters with an intensity of longing that I can never forget.
  • I read them in the intervals between study and play with an ever-deepening sense of pleasure.
  • I loved "Little Women" because it gave me a sense of kinship with girls and boys who could see and hear.
  • One sympathizes with their loves and hatreds, laughs over their comedies, and weeps over their tragedies.
  • In my fancy the pagan gods and goddesses still walked on earth and talked face to face with men, and in my heart I secretly built shrines to those I loved best.
  • I was familiar with the story of Troy before I read it in the original, and consequently I had little difficulty in making the Greek words surrender their treasures after I had passed the borderland of grammar.
  • Virgil is serene and lovely like a marble Apollo in the moonlight; Homer is a beautiful, animated youth in the full sunlight with the wind in his hair.
  • The unusual language and repetition made the story seem unreal.
  • Ruth is so loyal and gentle-hearted, we cannot help loving her, as she stands with the reapers amid the waving corn.
  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
  • In my college reading I have become somewhat familiar with French and German literature.
  • I like to contend with wind and wave.
  • We went in a sail-boat along with many others to watch the races.
  • Our little boat confronted the gale fearlessly; with sails spread and ropes taut, she seemed to sit upon the wind.
  • Tacking and jibbing, we wrestled with opposing winds that drove us from side to side with impetuous fury.
  • Our hearts beat fast, and our hands trembled with excitement, not fear, for we had the hearts of vikings, and we knew that our skipper was master of the situation.
  • He had steered through many a storm with firm hand and sea-wise eye.
  • Wrentham, Massachusetts, is associated with nearly all of my joys and sorrows.
  • I remember with deepest gratitude the kindness of these dear friends and the happy days I spent with them.
  • Mr. Chamberlin initiated me into the mysteries of tree and wild-flower, until with the little ear of love I heard the flow of sap in the oak, and saw the sun glint from leaf to leaf.
  • I use playing cards marked in the upper right-hand corner with braille symbols which indicate the value of the card.
  • If there are children around, nothing pleases me so much as to frolic with them.
  • A medallion of Homer hangs on the wall of my study, conveniently low, so that I can easily reach it and touch the beautiful, sad face with loving reverence.
  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.
  • Mr. Jefferson's, beautiful, pathetic representation quite carried me away with delight.
  • He asked me to indicate as far as I could the gestures and action that should go with the lines.
  • Of course, I have no sense whatever of dramatic action, and could make only random guesses; but with masterful art he suited the action to the word.
  • Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful?
  • Then comes hope with a smile and whispers, "There is joy in self-forgetfulness."
  • The perplexities, irritations and worries that have absorbed us pass like unpleasant dreams, and we wake to see with new eyes and hear with new ears the beauty and harmony of God's real world.
  • They are like people who when walking with you try to shorten their steps to suit yours; the hypocrisy in both cases is equally exasperating.
  • I have met people so empty of joy, that when I clasped their frosty finger tips, it seemed as if I were shaking hands with a northeast storm.
  • I count it one of the sweetest privileges of my life to have known and conversed with many men of genius.
  • As a child I loved to sit on his knee and clasp his great hand with one of mine, while Miss Sullivan spelled into the other his beautiful words about God and the spiritual world.
  • I heard him with a child's wonder and delight.
  • Love your Heavenly Father with your whole heart and soul, love every child of God as much as ever you can, and remember that the possibilities of good are greater than the possibilities of evil; and you have the key to Heaven.
  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
  • I have known him since I was eight, and my love for him has increased with my years.
  • He has filled the old skins of dogma with the new wine of love, and shown men what it is to believe, live and be free.
  • I could not keep pace with all these literary folk as they glanced from subject to subject and entered into deep dispute, or made conversation sparkle with epigrams and happy witticisms.
  • I was like little Ascanius, who followed with unequal steps the heroic strides of Aeneas on his march toward mighty destinies.
  • To them and to a few friends with whom she is in closest sympathy she writes with intimate frankness whatever she is thinking about.
  • So these selections from Miss Keller's correspondence are made with two purposes--to show her development and to preserve the most entertaining and significant passages from several hundred letters.
  • Except for two or three important letters of 1901, these selections cease with the year 1900.
  • I did play with your watch.
  • We do have fun with Jumbo.
  • Nancy will go with me.
  • We did dance and play and eat nuts and candy and cakes and oranges and I did have fun with little boys and girls.
  • Men do cut sheep's wool off with large shears, and send it to the mill.
  • I went to Knoxville with father and aunt.
  • I do love to play with little sister.
  • Nancy was a bad child when I went to Memphis she cried loud, I whipped her with a stick.
  • Mildred does feed little chickens with crumbs.
  • I love to play with little sister.
  • I will have fun with little blind girls.
  • I do love to run and hop and skip with Robert in bright warm sun.
  • I love to play with little sister, she is weak and small baby.
  • Robert will come to see me Sunday when sun shines and I will have fun with him.
  • With much love and a kiss HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Friday teacher and I went to a picnic with little children.
  • Adeline is well and she can go to Cincinnati Monday with me.
  • I send many kisses and hugs with letter.
  • On May 26th they arrived in Boston and went to the Perkins Institution; here Helen met the little blind girls with whom she had corresponded the year before.
  • Next summer Mildred will go out in the garden with me and pick the big sweet strawberries and then she will be very happy.
  • When I visit many strange countries my brother and Mildred will stay with grandmother because they will be too small to see a great many people and I think they would cry loud on the great rough ocean.
  • With much love and two kisses From your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Teacher and I had a lovely time with many kind friends.
  • I played with many little girls and we had fun.
  • Will Mildred sleep with me when I come home.
  • With much love and thousand kisses.
  • Many years ago there lived in England many good people, but the king and his friends were not kind and gentle and patient with good people, because the king did not like to have the people disobey him.
  • People did not like to go to church with the king; but they did like to build very nice little churches for themselves.
  • The king was very angry with the people and they were sorry and they said, we will go away to a strange country to live and leave very dear home and friends and naughty king.
  • With much love and many kisses, from your little friend.
  • She assimilated words and practised with them, sometimes using them intelligently, sometimes repeating them in a parrot-like fashion.
  • I hope you will go with me to Athens to see the maid of Athens.
  • With much love from your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • With much love, and many kisses, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • With much love and kisses, from your Affectionate cousin HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I would love to visit many beautiful cities with you.
  • I am so glad that Eva is coming to stay with me this summer.
  • "I will stay with you," said she to the doll, although she was not at all courageous.
  • I have laughed at the poor duck, with the red rag tied round its leg.
  • One sits on the twig of a tree, just beneath our window, and he fills the air with his glad songs.
  • With much love and many kisses, from your affectionate little friend, HELEN ADAMS KELLER.
  • Her little brown mate has flown away with the other birds; but Annie is not sad, for she likes to stay with me.
  • The air is sweet with the perfume of jasmines, heliotropes and roses.
  • What was the name of the little boy who fell in love with the beautiful star?
  • Then I will take his soft chubby hand in mine, and go out in the bright sunshine with him.
  • Not far from the mill there was an old house, with many trees growing close to it.
  • I am going to send you a birthday gift with this letter.
  • At nine I go to the gymnasium with the little girls and we have great fun.
  • At eleven I talk with teacher and at twelve I study zoology.
  • I am studying in Boston, with my dear teacher.
  • I was very sorry that the poor little girl with the browns and the "tangled golden curls" died.
  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?
  • They came while we were eating breakfast, and my friends enjoyed them with me.
  • With much love, from your darling child, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I imagine she will have fun with the little toy man.
  • The flowers were wilted, but the kind thought which came with them was as sweet and as fresh as newly pulled violets.
  • With loving greeting to the little cousins, and Mrs. Hale and a sweet kiss for yourself, From your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I am sorry that you have no little children to play with you sometimes; but I think you are very happy with your books, and your many, many friends.
  • My teacher told me Tuesday that you wanted to know how I came to wish to talk with my mouth.
  • And I would keep my little hand on her face all the while, because it amused me to feel her face and lips move when she talked with people.
  • This was the first home-going after she had learned to "talk with her mouth."
  • I was very, very sad to part with all of my friends in Boston, but I was so eager to see my baby sister I could hardly wait for the train to take me home.
  • My great dog Lioness goes with us when we ride to protect us.
  • I can almost think I see you with your father and mother and little sister, with all the brightness of the beautiful country about you, and it makes me very glad to know how glad you are.
  • Your letter is charming, and I am greatly pleased with it.
  • I am very much delighted to hear of your new acquisition--that you "talk with your mouth" as well as with your fingers.
  • It almost makes me think the world would get along as well without seeing and hearing as with them.
  • Just think of an army of blind people, with guns and cannon!
  • Please tell the brave sailors, who have charge of the HELEN KELLER, that little Helen who stays at home will often think of them with loving thoughts.
  • With much love, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • We found the boat and the transfer carriage with much less difficulty than teacher expected.
  • With much love to father, Mildred, you and all the dear friends, lovingly your little daughter, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • This evening they are going to entertain their friends with readings from your poems and music.
  • The sun knows that you like to see the world covered with beautiful white snow and so he kept back all his brightness, and let the little crystals form in the sky.
  • Then the sun will appear in all his radiance and fill the world with light.
  • If I were with you to-day I would give you eighty-three kisses, one for each year you have lived.
  • Of course the sun did not shine, but we had great open wood fires in the rooms, which were all very sweet with roses and other flowers, which were sent to me from distant friends; and fruits of all kinds from California and other places.
  • Some relatives and dear old friends were with me through the day.
  • I am not blind any longer, for I see with your eyes and hear with your ears.
  • I hope the glad news which you will tell them will make their hearts beat fast with joy and love.
  • Then I knew that you had not forgotten the dear little child, for the gift brought with it the thought of tender sympathy.
  • With much love and a kiss, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Teacher sends her kind remembrances, and I send you with my picture my dear love.
  • Now, dear friend, Please accept these few words because of the love that is linked with them.
  • We guide the pencil with the right hand, and feel carefully with the forefinger of the left hand to see that we shape and space the letters correctly.
  • Please let Bishop Brooks know our plans, so that he may arrange to be with us.
  • This wonderful world with all its sunlight and beauty was hidden from me, and I had never dreamed of its loveliness.
  • For a whole week it has been "cold and dark and dreary" in Tuscumbia, and I must confess the continuous rain and dismalness of the weather fills me with gloomy thoughts and makes the writing of letters, or any pleasant employment, seem quite impossible.
  • I send you with this letter a pretty book which my teacher thinks will interest you, and my picture.
  • Please accept them with the love and good wishes of your friend, HELEN KELLER.
  • I would like to feel a parrot talk, it would be so much fun! but I would be pleased with, and love any little creature you send me.
  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER South Boston, April 13, 1893. ...Teacher, Mrs. Pratt and I very unexpectedly decided to take a journey with dear Dr. Bell Mr. Westervelt, a gentleman whom father met in Washington, has a school for the deaf in Rochester.
  • A lady seemed surprised that I loved flowers when I could not see their beautiful colors, and when I assured her I did love them, she said, "no doubt you feel the colors with your fingers."
  • Mr. Munsell spent last Sunday evening with us.
  • I hope when I visit Venice, as I surely shall some day, that Mr. Munsell will go with me.
  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."
  • Please favour her with every facility to examine the exhibits in the several Departments, and extend to her such other courtesies as may be possible.
  • Dr. Bell went with us himself to the electrical building, and showed us some of the historical telephones.
  • I went to the Japanese department with Prof. Morse who is a well-known lecturer.
  • I shall prize the little book always, not only for its own value; but because of its associations with you.
  • I enjoy my singing lessons with Dr. Humason more than I can say.
  • Sweet Rebecca, with her strong, brave spirit, and her pure, generous nature, was the only character which thoroughly won my admiration.
  • Mr. Warner and Mr. Burroughs, the great lover of nature, came to see us a few days after, and we had a delightful talk with them.
  • I have read "Le Medecin Malgre Lui," a very good French comedy by Moliere, with pleasure; and they say I speak French pretty well now, and German also.
  • We think of you so, so often! and our hearts go out to you in tenderest sympathy; and you know better than this poor letter can tell you how happy we always are to have you with us!
  • There are about a hundred girls, and they are all so bright and happy; it is a joy to be with them.
  • It is such a delight to be with the other girls, and do everything that they do.
  • July 9, 1897. ...Teacher and I are going to spend the summer at Wrentham, Mass. with our friends, the Chamberlins.
  • All the time I was preparing for the great ordeal, I could not suppress an inward fear and trembling lest I should fail, and now it is an unspeakable relief to know that I have passed the examinations with credit.
  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.
  • My teacher and other friends think I could ride a Columbia tandem in the country with perfect safety.
  • I ride with a divided skirt, and so does my teacher; but it would be easier for her to mount a man's wheel than for me; so, if it could be arranged to have the ladies' seat behind, I think it would be better....
  • The "Iliad" is beautiful with all the truth, and grace and simplicity of a wonderfully childlike people while the "Aeneid" is more stately and reserved.
  • But alas! they are not, and I shall have to content myself with a stroll in the Gardens.
  • Indeed, I doubt if they are on speaking terms with their country cousins!
  • Do you know, I cannot help feeling sorry for these trees with all their fashionable airs?
  • The thought that my dear Heavenly Father is always near, giving me abundantly of all those things, which truly enrich life and make it sweet and beautiful, makes every deprivation seem of little moment compared with the countless blessings I enjoy.
  • I also saw poor Niobe with her youngest child clinging close to her while she implored the cruel goddess not to kill her last darling.
  • Why, only a little while ago people thought it quite impossible to teach the deaf-blind anything; but no sooner was it proved possible than hundreds of kind, sympathetic hearts were fired with the desire to help them, and now we see how many of those poor, unfortunate persons are being taught to see the beauty and reality of life.
  • You will be glad to hear that my mother, and little sister and brother are coming north to spend this summer with me.
  • She reads the lips well, and if she cannot understand a phrase, her friends write it in her hand, and in this way she converses with strangers.
  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON Wrentham, July 29, 1899. ...I passed in all the subjects I offered, and with credit in advanced Latin....
  • Mr. Vining was a perfect stranger to me, and could not communicate with me except by writing in braille.
  • The Proctor also was a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way; and, as they were both unfamiliar with my speech, they could not readily understand what I said to them.
  • The waist is trimmed with pink and green brocaded velvet, and white lace, I think, and has double reefers on the front, tucked and trimmed with velvet, and also a row of tiny white buttons.
  • The skirt is black, while the waist is mostly yellow, trimmed with delicate lavender chiffon, and black velvet bows and lace.
  • Her other dress is purple, trimmed with purple velvet, and the waist has a collar of cream lace.
  • We dined with the Rogers last Friday, and oh, they were so kind to us!
  • I am afraid I find fault with the poem as much as I enjoy it.
  • In college she, or possibly in some subjects some one else, would of necessity be with me in the lecture-room and at recitations.
  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 14 Coolidge Ave., Cambridge, Nov. 26, 1900. ...--has already communicated with you in regard to her and my plan of establishing an institution for deaf and blind children.
  • We had a long talk with Dr. Bell.
  • At the same time Dr. Bell added that I could rest content and fight my way through Radcliffe in competition with seeing and hearing girls, while the great desire of my heart was being fulfilled.
  • We clapped our hands and shouted;--went away beaming with pleasure, and Teacher and I felt more light of heart than we had for sometime.
  • Katie played with Miss Rhoades's rings and took them away, saying with a merry laugh, "You shall not have them again!"
  • Now, however, I see the folly of attempting to hitch one's wagon to a star with harness that does not belong to it.
  • Did I tell you in my last letter that I had a new dress, a real party dress with low neck and short sleeves and quite a train?
  • It is pale blue, trimmed with chiffon of the same color.
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • I have had a letter from Mrs. Thaw with regard to the possibility of doing something for these children.
  • He had just constructed a boat that could be propelled by a kite with the wind in its favor, and one day he tried experiments to see if he could steer the kite against the wind.
  • Dr. Bell said "No!" with great confidence, and the kite was sent up.
  • Miss Keller does not suppose her views to be of great importance, and when she utters her opinions on important matters she takes it for granted that her reader will receive them as the opinions of a junior in college, not of one who writes with the wisdom of maturity.
  • Long corrections she wrote out on her typewriter, with catch-words to indicate where they belonged.
  • The admiration with which the world has regarded her is more than justified by what she has done.
  • She seems to be more nervous than she really is, because she expresses more with her hands than do most English-speaking people.
  • When she is talking with an intimate friend, however, her hand goes quickly to her friend's face to see, as she says, "the twist of the mouth."
  • Skill in the use of words and her habit of playing with them make her ready with mots and epigrams.
  • "Yes," she replied, "but I like to play also, and I feel sometimes as if I were a music box with all the play shut up inside me."
  • If she does not know the answer to a question, she guesses with mischievous assurance.
  • If others are aglow with music, a responding glow, caught sympathetically, shines in her face.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.
  • She does not see with her eyes, but through the inner faculty to serve which eyes were given to us.
  • Many of the detached incidents and facts of our daily life pass around and over her unobserved; but she has enough detailed acquaintance with the world to keep her view of it from being essentially defective.
  • A friend tried Miss Keller one day with several coins.
  • Large statues, of which she can feel the sweep of line with her whole hand, she knows in their higher esthetic value.
  • Most blind people are aided by the sense of sound, so that a fair comparison is hard to make, except with other deaf-blind persons.
  • The only thing she does which requires skill with the hands is her work on the typewriter.
  • She writes with fair speed and absolute sureness.
  • Even people who know her fairly well have written in the magazines about Miss Sullivan's "mysterious telegraphic communications" with her pupil.
  • The deaf person with sight looks at the fingers of his companion, but it is also possible to feel them.
  • Miss Sullivan and others who live constantly with the deaf can spell very rapidly--fast enough to get a slow lecture, not fast enough to get every word of a rapid speaker.
  • The ordinary embossed book is made with roman letters, both small letters and capitals.
  • The books are not heavy, because the leaves with the raised type do not lie close.
  • They cost a great deal to publish and they have not a large enough sale to make them profitable to the publisher; but there are several institutions with special funds to pay for embossed books.
  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.
  • It should be said that any double-case watch with the crystal removed serves well enough for a blind person whose touch is sufficiently delicate to feel the position of the hands and not disturb or injure them.
  • Now that she has grown up, nobody thinks of being less frank with her than with any other intelligent young woman.
  • She is in love with noble things, with noble thoughts, and with the characters of noble men and women.
  • In the diary that she kept at the Wright-Humason School in New York she wrote on October 18, 1894, "I find that I have four things to learn in my school life here, and indeed, in life--to think clearly without hurry or confusion, to love everybody sincerely, to act in everything with the highest motives, and to trust in dear God unhesitatingly."
  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.
  • Dr. Howe was an experimental scientist and had in him the spirit of New England transcendentalism with its large faith and large charities.
  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.
  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.
  • In December, 1887, appeared the first report of the Director of the Perkins Institution, which deals with Helen Keller.
  • For this report Miss Sullivan prepared, in reluctant compliance with the request of Mr. Anagnos, an account of her work.
  • This with the extracts from her letters, scattered through the report, is the first valid source of information about Helen Keller.
  • Mr. Anagnos was delighted with it.
  • So she consented to the publication of extracts from letters which she wrote during the first year of her work with her pupil.
  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.
  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.
  • Mr. Anagnos wrote in the report of the Perkins Institution, dated November 27, 1888: At my urgent request, Helen, accompanied by her mother and her teacher, came to the North in the last week of May, and spent several months with us as our guests....
  • No one interferes with Miss Sullivan's plans, or shares in her tasks.
  • For the ease of the reader I have, with Miss Sullivan's consent, made the extracts run together continuously and supplied words of connection and the resulting necessary changes in syntax, and Miss Sullivan has made slight changes in the phrasing of her reports and also of her letters, which were carelessly written.
  • I tried with all my might to control the eagerness that made me tremble so that I could hardly walk.
  • Her untaught, unsatisfied hands destroy whatever they touch because they do not know what else to do with things.
  • I shook my head and tried to form the letters with her fingers; but she got more and more angry.
  • She ran downstairs with it and could not be induced to return to my room all day.
  • She follows with her hands every motion you make, and she knew that I was looking for the doll.
  • She nodded and began at once to fill the string with wooden beads.
  • She amused herself with the beads until dinner-time, bringing the strings to me now and then for my approval.
  • I had a battle royal with Helen this morning.
  • After a few minutes she came back to her place and began to eat her breakfast with her fingers.
  • I suppose I shall have many such battles with the little woman before she learns the only two essential things I can teach her, obedience and love.
  • I very soon made up my mind that I could do nothing with Helen in the midst of the family, who have always allowed her to do exactly as she pleased.
  • I had a good, frank talk with Mrs. Keller, and explained to her how difficult it was going to be to do anything with Helen under the existing circumstances.
  • After a long time Mrs. Keller said that she would think the matter over and see what Captain Keller thought of sending Helen away with me.
  • There is a piazza in front, covered with vines that grow so luxuriantly that you have to part them to see the garden beyond.
  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.
  • She played with her dolls more than usual, and would have nothing to do with me.
  • It is amusing and pathetic to see Helen with her dolls.
  • I don't agree with him; but I suppose we shall have to leave our little bower very soon.
  • I have told Captain and Mrs. Keller that they must not interfere with me in any way.
  • Only a few hours after my talk with Captain and Mrs. Keller (and they had agreed to everything), Helen took a notion that she wouldn't use her napkin at table.
  • She sleeps with me now.
  • Then it occurred to me that with the help of this new word I might succeed in straightening out the "mug-milk" difficulty.
  • The child comes into the world with the ability to learn, and he learns of himself, provided he is supplied with sufficient outward stimulus.
  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.
  • "Milk," with a gesture means, "Give me more milk."
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • Nothing would do but I must go somewhere with her to see something.
  • She led the way to the pump-house, and there in the corner was one of the setters with five dear little pups!
  • She screamed with glee when the little things squealed and squirmed in their efforts to get back to their mother, and spelled, "Baby--eat large."
  • After she had played with them a little while, the thought occurred to her that the puppies must have special names, like people, and she asked for the name of each pup.
  • Every new word Helen learns seems to carry with it necessity for many more.
  • Keller's Landing was used during the war to land troops, but has long since gone to pieces, and is overgrown with moss and weeds.
  • WE MAKE A SORT OF GAME OF IT and try to see who can find the words most quickly, Helen with her fingers, or I with my eyes, and she learns as many new words as I can explain with the help of those she knows.
  • When her fingers light upon words she knows, she fairly screams with pleasure and hugs and kisses me for joy, especially if she thinks she has me beaten.
  • She is delighted with action-words; so it is no trouble at all to teach her verbs.
  • She is always ready for a lesson, and the eagerness with which she absorbs ideas is very delightful.
  • She went through these motions several times, mimicking every movement, then she stood very still for a moment with a troubled look on her face, which suddenly cleared, and she spelled, "Good Helen," and wreathed her face in a very large, artificial smile.
  • It is hard to know what to do with her.
  • If I refuse to talk to her, she spells into her own hand, and apparently carries on the liveliest conversation with herself.
  • I gave her my braille slate to play with, thinking that the mechanical pricking of holes in the paper would amuse her and rest her mind.
  • She has often gone with me to the post-office to mail letters, and I suppose I have repeated to her things I wrote to you.
  • The other night when I went to bed, I found Helen sound asleep with a big book clasped tightly in her arms.
  • Book will sleep with girl.
  • When the sun got round to the window where she was sitting with her book, she got up impatiently and shut the window.
  • It's queer how ready people always are with advice in any real or imaginary emergency, and no matter how many times experience has shown them to be wrong, they continue to set forth their opinions, as if they had received them from the Almighty!
  • I said, "No, go and play with Nancy."
  • During our walks she keeps up a continual spelling, and delights to accompany it with actions such as skipping, hopping, jumping, running, walking fast, walking slow, and the like.
  • She can count to thirty very quickly, and can write seven of the square-hand letters and the words which can be made with them.
  • She enjoys punching holes in paper with the stiletto, and I supposed it was because she could examine the result of her work; but we watched her one day, and I was much surprised to find that she imagined she was writing a letter.
  • She had been with me to take letters to the post-office.
  • Unlike Laura Bridgman, she is fond of gentlemen, and we notice that she makes friends with a gentleman sooner than with a lady.
  • She is always ready to share whatever she has with those about her, often keeping but very little for herself.
  • It seems Viney had attempted to take a glass, which Helen was filling with stones, fearing that she would break it.
  • I asked what was the matter, and she spelled: "Viney--bad," and began to slap and kick her with renewed violence.
  • Will you go with me and find Viney?
  • Everybody there was delighted with Helen, and showered her with gifts and kisses.
  • She taught the young people the alphabet, and several of them learned to talk with her.
  • We had Helen's picture taken with a fuzzy, red-eyed little poodle, who got himself into my lady's good graces by tricks and cunning devices known only to dogs with an instinct for getting what they want.
  • You see, I had to use words and images with which she was familiar through the sense of touch.
  • She was much pleased with the letter, and after she had asked all the questions she could think of, she took it to her mother, who was sewing in the hall, and read it to her.
  • In the meantime Mildred had got the letter and crept away with it.
  • Then she got up and stood very still, as if listening with her feet for Mildred's "thump, thump."
  • I said, "Mildred doesn't understand your fingers, and we must be very gentle with her."
  • Helen will give baby pretty letter," and with that she ran upstairs and brought down a neatly folded sheet of braille, on which she had written some words, and gave it to Mildred, saying, "Baby can eat all words."
  • He agreed with Mr. Anagnos that it was my duty to give others the benefit of my experience.
  • Only those who are with her daily can realize the rapid advancement which she is making in the acquisition of language.
  • I told her that I could see things with my eyes, and that she could see them with her fingers.
  • Here follows the last part, beginning with the great day, April 5th, when Helen learned water.
  • In connection with this lesson she learned the names of the members of the family and the word IS.
  • I then said to her with the finger alphabet, "wind fast," or "wind slow," holding her hands and showing her how to do as I wished.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • When she touched one with which she was familiar, a peculiarly sweet expression lighted her face, and we saw her countenance growing sweeter and more earnest every day.
  • She can add and subtract with great rapidity up to the sum of one hundred; and she knows the multiplication tables as far as the FIVES.
  • She was working recently with the number forty, when I said to her, "Make twos."
  • Her eyes actually were filled with tears.
  • On another occasion while walking with me she seemed conscious of the presence of her brother, although we were distant from him.
  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.
  • I want her to know children and to be with them as much as possible.
  • So far, her only knowledge of death is in connection with things to eat.
  • How ridiculous it is to say I had drunk so copiously of the noble spirit of Dr. Howe that I was fired with the desire to rescue from darkness and obscurity the little Alabamian!
  • I don't know what I should have done, had some of the young people not learned to talk with her.
  • The stores in Memphis are very good, and I managed to spend all the money that I had with me.
  • What will you do with the dollar?
  • Dr. Hale claims kinship with Helen, and seems very proud of his little cousin.
  • After breakfast I played with dolls short.
  • Robert and I will run and jump and hop and dance and swing and talk about birds and flowers and trees and grass and Jumbo and Pearl will go with us.
  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.
  • I think Mrs. Keller has definitely decided to go with us, but she will not stay all summer.
  • We spent a delightful week with the "doctors."
  • Everybody was delighted with Helen.
  • She was delighted with the orchestra at the hotel, and whenever the music began she danced round the room, hugging and kissing every one she happened to touch.
  • "Some beautiful gloves to talk with," she answered.
  • We lunched with Mr. Thayer (your former pastor) and his wife.
  • On entering a greenhouse her countenance becomes radiant, and she will tell the names of the flowers with which she is familiar, by the sense of smell alone.
  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.
  • She is able not only to distinguish with great accuracy the different undulations of the air and the vibrations of the floor made by various sounds and motions, and to recognize her friends and acquaintances the instant she touches their hands or clothing, but she also perceives the state of mind of those around her.
  • It is impossible for any one with whom Helen is conversing to be particularly happy or sad, and withhold the knowledge of this fact from her.
  • In my account of Helen last year, I mentioned several instances where she seemed to have called into use an inexplicable mental faculty; but it now seems to me, after carefully considering the matter, that this power may be explained by her perfect familiarity with the muscular variations of those with whom she comes into contact, caused by their emotions.
  • She has learned to connect certain movements of the body with anger, others with joy, and others still with sorrow.
  • One day, while she was out walking with her mother and Mr. Anagnos, a boy threw a torpedo, which startled Mrs. Keller.
  • On one occasion, while walking on the Common with her, I saw a police officer taking a man to the station-house.
  • The aurists then tried their experiments with quite different results.
  • The animal groaned with pain, and Helen, perceiving his groans, was filled with pity.
  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"
  • She is fond of fun and frolic, and loves dearly to be with other children.
  • She is never fretful or irritable, and I have never seen her impatient with her playmates because they failed to understand her.
  • Then it is beautiful to observe with what patience, sweetness, and perseverance Helen endeavours to bring the unruly fingers of her little friend into proper position.
  • She has a very sociable disposition, and delights in the companionship of those who can follow the rapid motions of her fingers; but if left alone she will amuse herself for hours at a time with her knitting or sewing.
  • She bends over her book with a look of intense interest, and as the forefinger of her left hand runs along the line, she spells out the words with the other hand; but often her motions are so rapid as to be unintelligible even to those accustomed to reading the swift and varied movements of her fingers.
  • Sitting beside her in the car, I describe what I see from the window--hills and valleys and the rivers; cotton-fields and gardens in which strawberries, peaches, pears, melons, and vegetables are growing; herds of cows and horses feeding in broad meadows, and flocks of sheep on the hillside; the cities with their churches and schools, hotels and warehouses, and the occupations of the busy people.
  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."
  • While not confining myself to any special system of instruction, I have tried to add to her general information and intelligence, to enlarge her acquaintance with things around her, and to bring her into easy and natural relations with people.
  • I slept with father, and Mildred slept with teacher.
  • I saw Mr. Wilson and James row with oars.
  • I caught fish with hook and line and pole.
  • The calf licked good boy's face with long rough tongue.
  • The horse was an old, worn-out chestnut, with an ill-kept coat, and bones that showed plainly through it; the knees knuckled over, and the forelegs were very unsteady.
  • She was quiet for a moment, and then asked, with spirit: How do you know that I cannot understand?
  • You must remember, dear teacher, that Greek parents were very particular with their children, and they used to let them listen to wise words, and I think they understood some of them.
  • Not long ago I tried to show her how to build a tower with her blocks.
  • Some of these words have successive steps of meaning, beginning with what is simple and leading on to what is abstract.
  • She will guess the meanings of the new words from their connection with others which are already intelligible to her.
  • In selecting books for Helen to read, I have never chosen them with reference to her deafness and blindness.
  • She then moved her finger to the next line with an expression of eager interest.
  • She was familiar with the words of the last sentence, and was delighted when allowed to act them out.
  • I am convinced that Helen's use of English is due largely to her familiarity with books.
  • Whenever she meets any one who is familiar with this system, she is delighted to use it in conversation.
  • I have found it a convenient medium of communicating with Helen when she is at some distance from me, for it enables me to talk with her by tapping upon the floor with my foot.
  • It is impossible to isolate a child in the midst of society, so that he shall not be influenced by the beliefs of those with whom he associates.
  • Through Charles Kingsley's "Greek Heroes" she had become familiar with the beautiful stories of the Greek gods and goddesses, and she must have met with the words GOD, HEAVEN, SOUL, and a great many similar expressions in books.
  • When I subsequently talked with her she said: I have something very funny to tell you.
  • Here she examined her arm with evident satisfaction, laughing heartily to herself.
  • She had met with the expression Mother Nature in the course of her reading, and for a long time she was in the habit of ascribing to Mother Nature whatever she felt to be beyond the power of man to accomplish.
  • I love the beautiful spring, because the budding trees and the blossoming flowers and the tender green leaves fill my heart with joy.
  • After May, 1890, it was evident to me that she had reached a point where it was impossible to keep from her the religious beliefs held by those with whom she was in daily contact.
  • She almost overwhelmed me with inquiries which were the natural outgrowth of her quickened intelligence.
  • She shrinks from the thought of death with evident dismay.
  • I said, "No; because, if there were no death, our world would soon be so crowded with living creatures that it would be impossible for any of them to live comfortably."
  • Is it blind? she asked; for in her mind the idea of being led was associated with blindness.
  • She knows with unerring instinct what is right, and does it joyously.
  • At first, the words, phrases and sentences which she used in expressing her thoughts were all reproductions of what we had used in conversation with her, and which her memory had unconsciously retained.
  • The memory must be stored with ideas and the mind must be enriched with knowledge before writing becomes a natural and pleasurable effort.
  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.
  • "Oh, please read us the rest, even if we won't understand it," they pleaded, delighted with the rhythm, and the beauty which they felt, even though they could not have explained it.
  • It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and profit.
  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.
  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.
  • She got the language from the language itself, and this is, next to hearing the language spoken, the way for any one to get a foreign tongue, more vital and, in the end, easier than our schoolroom method of beginning with the grammar.
  • In the same way she played with Latin, learning not only from the lessons her first Latin teacher gave her, but from going over and over the words of a text, a game she played by herself.
  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
  • When Miss Sullivan went out in the barnyard and picked up a little chicken and talked to Helen about it, she was giving a kind of instruction impossible inside four walls, and impossible with more than one pupil at a time.
  • Her speech lacks variety and modulation; it runs in a sing-song when she is reading aloud; and when she speaks with fair degree of loudness, it hovers about two or three middle tones.
  • When she is telling a child's story, or one with pathos in it, her voice runs into pretty slurs from one tone to another.
  • Another friend, who is as familiar with French as with English, finds her French much more intelligible than her English.
  • How do the blind girls know what to say with their mouths?
  • But, with all her eagerness and intelligence, learning to speak taxed her powers to the utmost.
  • In the very nature of things, articulation is an unsatisfactory means of education; while the use of the manual alphabet quickens and invigorates mental activity, since through it the deaf child is brought into close contact with the English language, and the highest and most abstract ideas may be conveyed to the mind readily and accurately.
  • She was already perfectly familiar with words and the construction of sentences, and had only mechanical difficulties to overcome.
  • When she was stricken down with the illness which resulted in her loss of sight and hearing, at the age of nineteen months, she was learning to talk.
  • If she detected no smile, she gesticulated excitedly, trying to convey her thought; but if she failed to make her companion laugh, she sat still for a few moments, with a troubled and disappointed expression.
  • She was pleased with anything which made a noise.
  • The only words she had learned to pronounce with any degree of distinctness previous to March, 1890, were PAPA, MAMMA, BABY, SISTER.
  • Hard consonants were, and indeed still are, very difficult for her to pronounce in connection with one another in the same word; she often suppresses the one and changes the other, and sometimes she replaces both by an analogous sound with soft aspiration.
  • Enough appears in the accounts by Miss Keller's teacher to show the process by which she reads the lips with her fingers, the process by which she was taught to speak, and by which, of course, she can listen to conversation now.
  • I also discuss the political situation with my dear father, and we decide the most perplexing questions quite as satisfactorily to ourselves as if I could see and hear.
  • It brings me into closer and tenderer relationship with those I love, and makes it possible for me to enjoy the sweet companionship of a great many persons from whom I should be entirely cut off if I could not talk.
  • * In this paper Miss Sullivan says: During this winter (1891-92) I went with her into the yard while a light snow was falling, and let her feel the falling flakes.
  • One warm, sunny day in early spring, when we were at the North, the balmy atmosphere appears to have brought to her mind the sentiment expressed by Longfellow in "Hiawatha," and she almost sings with the poet: "The ground was all aquiver with the stir of new life.
  • The pictures the language paints on her memory appear to make an indelible impression; and many times, when an experience comes to her similar in character, the language starts forth with wonderful accuracy, like the reflection from a mirror.
  • Helen's mind is so gifted by nature that she seems able to understand with only the faintest touch of explanation every possible variety of external relations.
  • She closes this letter with, "I must go to bed, for Morpheus has touched my eyelids with his golden wand."
  • Helen and I spent the summer of 1888 with Mrs. Hopkins at her home in Brewster, Mass., where she kindly relieved me a part of the time, of the care of Helen.
  • The fresh morning air blew softly in his face, as if to welcome him and be his merry playmate; and the bright eye of Mr. Sun looked at him with a warm and glowing smile; but Birdie soon walked on to find something to play with.
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • Now he found out that his father's words were true, for a few days of warm weather had turned the green balls into rosebuds, and they were SO beautiful that it was enough to make Birdie stand still before them, his blue eyes dancing with delight and his little hands clasped tightly together.
  • She was playing on the pier with a wee brother.
  • I was a very happy little child with rosy cheeks, and large blue eyes, and the most beautiful golden ringlets you can imagine.
  • The fresh morning air blew gently in my face, as if to welcome me, and be my merry playmate, and the sun looked at me with a warm and tender smile.
  • I clapped my chubby hands for joy when I saw that the rose-bushes were covered with lovely buds.
  • But his most wonderful work is the painting of the trees, which look, after his task is done, as if they were covered with the brightest layers of gold and rubies; and are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • So he called together his merry little fairies, and showing them a number of jars and vases filled with gold and precious stones, told them to carry those carefully to the palace of Santa Claus, and give them to him with the compliments of King Frost.
  • Then looking more closely at the trees around, they saw that the treasure was all melting away, and that much of it was already spread over the leaves of the oak trees and maples, which were shining with their gorgeous dress of gold and bronze, crimson and emerald.
  • King Frost frowned and looked very angry at first, and his fairies trembled for fear and cowered still lower in their hiding-places; but just then two little children came dancing through the wood, and though they did not see King Frost or the fairies, they saw the beautiful colour of the leaves, and laughed with delight, and began picking great bunches to take to their mother.
  • When the children saw the trees all aglow with brilliant colors they clapped their hands and shouted for joy, and immediately began to pick great bunches to take home.
  • My heart was full of tears, for I love the beautiful truth with my whole heart and mind.
  • I hasten to assure you that Helen could not have received any idea of the story from any of her relations or friends here, none of whom can communicate with her readily enough to impress her with the details of a story of that character.
  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.
  • She said, with great intensity of feeling, "I love the beautiful truth."
  • With most of us the contributions from different sources are blended, crossed and confused.
  • A child with but few sources may keep distinct what he draws from each.
  • In this case Helen Keller held almost intact in her mind, unmixed with other ideas, the words of a story which at the time it was read to her she did not fully understand.
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
  • The next morning I awoke with joy in my heart.
  • Everything I touched seemed to quiver with life.
  • In these years the fear came many times to Miss Sullivan lest the success of the child was to cease with childhood.
  • Then came the work in college--original theme writing with new ideals of composition or at least new methods of suggesting those ideals.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • To-day I took luncheon with the Freshman Class of Radcliffe.
  • For the first time since my entrance into Radcliffe I had the opportunity to make friends with all my classmates...
  • When all outside is cold and white, when the little children of the woodland are gone to their nurseries in the warm earth, and the empty nests on the bare trees fill with snow, my window-garden glows and smiles, making summer within while it is winter without.
  • I have felt a bud "shyly doff her green hood and blossom with a silken burst of sound," while the icy fingers of the snow beat against the window-panes.
  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.
  • I wake terror-stricken with the words ringing in my ears, "An answer or your life!"
  • I rarely have dreams that are not in keeping with what I really think and feel, but one night my very nature seemed to change, and I stood in the eye of the world a mighty man and a terrible.
  • I would wake with a start or struggle frantically to escape from my tormentor.
  • Would the heart, overweighted with sudden joy, stop beating for very excess of happiness?
  • They have no friend Iolaus to burn with a hot iron the root of the hydra's head, but as soon as one head is crushed, two spring up.
  • Public opinion is a weak tyrant compared with our own private opinion.
  • From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrats.
  • Hippocrates has even left directions how we should cut our nails; that is, even with the ends of the fingers, neither shorter nor longer.
  • To the bison of the prairie it is a few inches of palatable grass, with water to drink; unless he seeks the Shelter of the forest or the mountain's shadow.
  • So, we are told, the New Hollander goes naked with impunity, while the European shivers in his clothes.
  • Is it impossible to combine the hardiness of these savages with the intellectualness of the civilized man?
  • Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy.
  • With respect to luxuries and comforts, the wisest have ever lived a more simple and meagre life than the poor.
  • The soil, it appears, is suited to the seed, for it has sent its radicle downward, and it may now send its shoot upward also with confidence.
  • If I should attempt to tell how I have desired to spend my life in years past, it would probably surprise those of my readers who are somewhat acquainted with its actual history; it would certainly astonish those who know nothing about it.
  • It is said that a flood-tide, with a westerly wind, and ice in the Neva, would sweep St. Petersburg from the face of the earth.
  • It would be easier for them to hobble to town with a broken leg than with a broken pantaloon.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be.
  • She spins and weaves and cuts with full authority.
  • Let Harlequin be taken with a fit of the colic and his trappings will have to serve that mood too.
  • Who does not remember the interest with which, when young, he looked at shelving rocks, or any approach to a cave?
  • The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former....
  • He adds that they were commonly carpeted and lined within with well-wrought embroidered mats, and were furnished with various utensils.
  • But, answers one, by merely paying this tax, the poor civilized man secures an abode which is a palace compared with the savage's.
  • What mean ye by saying that the poor ye have always with you, or that the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge?
  • The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him.
  • With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it.
  • With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it.
  • Granted that the majority are able at last either to own or hire the modern house with all its improvements.
  • Their condition only proves what squalidness may consist with civilization.
  • Shall we always study to obtain more of these things, and not sometimes to be content with less?
  • At present our houses are cluttered and defiled with it, and a good housewife would sweep out the greater part into the dust hole, and not leave her morning's work undone.
  • I would rather ride on earth in an ox cart, with a free circulation, than go to heaven in the fancy car of an excursion train and breathe a malaria all the way.
  • When he was refreshed with food and sleep, he contemplated his journey again.
  • I speak understandingly on this subject, for I have made myself acquainted with it both theoretically and practically.
  • With a little more wit we might use these materials so as to become richer than the richest now are, and make our civilization a blessing.
  • Before I had done I was more the friend than the foe of the pine tree, though I had cut down some of them, having become better acquainted with it.
  • It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.
  • He was there to represent spectatordom, and help make this seemingly insignificant event one with the removal of the gods of Troy.
  • At length, in the beginning of May, with the help of some of my acquaintances, rather to improve so good an occasion for neighborliness than from any necessity, I set up the frame of my house.
  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • It would signify somewhat, if, in any earnest sense, he slanted them and daubed it; but the spirit having departed out of the tenant, it is of a piece with constructing his own coffin--the architecture of the grave--and "carpenter" is but another name for "coffin-maker."
  • Before winter I built a chimney, and shingled the sides of my house, which were already impervious to rain, with imperfect and sappy shingles made of the first slice of the log, whose edges I was obliged to straighten with a plane.
  • I have thus a tight shingled and plastered house, ten feet wide by fifteen long, and eight-feet posts, with a garret and a closet, a large window on each side, two trap doors, one door at the end, and a brick fireplace opposite.
  • Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.
  • Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.
  • "But," says one, "you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads?"
  • Such is the universal law, which no man can ever outwit, and with regard to the railroad even we may say it is as broad as it is long.
  • I got out several cords of stumps in plowing, which supplied me with fuel for a long time, and left small circles of virgin mould, easily distinguishable through the summer by the greater luxuriance of the beans there.
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to perpetuate the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave.
  • Mr. Balcom, a promising young architect, designs it on the back of his Vitruvius, with hard pencil and ruler, and the job is let out to Dobson & Sons, stonecutters.
  • "But what shall I do with my furniture?"--My gay butterfly is entangled in a spider's web then.
  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.
  • On the fourth morning, the high priest, by rubbing dry wood together, produces new fire in the public square, from whence every habitation in the town is supplied with the new and pure flame.
  • The laborer's day ends with the going down of the sun, and he is then free to devote himself to his chosen pursuit, independent of his labor; but his employer, who speculates from month to month, has no respite from one end of the year to the other.
  • If a man has faith, he will co-operate with equal faith everywhere; if he has not faith, he will continue to live like the rest of the world, whatever company he is joined to.
  • Men say, practically, Begin where you are and such as you are, without aiming mainly to become of more worth, and with kindness aforethought go about doing good.
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • If you give money, spend yourself with it, and do not merely abandon it to them.
  • If you give him money, he will perhaps buy more rags with it.
  • You boast of spending a tenth part of your income in charity; maybe you should spend the nine tenths so, and done with it.
  • The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own castoff griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • There is nowhere recorded a simple and irrepressible satisfaction with the gift of life, any memorable praise of God.
  • All health and success does me good, however far off and withdrawn it may appear; all disease and failure helps to make me sad and does me evil, however much sympathy it may have with me or I with it.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale--I have always cultivated a garden--was, that I had had my seeds ready.
  • Many think that seeds improve with age.
  • The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.
  • That way I looked between and over the near green hills to some distant and higher ones in the horizon, tinged with blue.
  • Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself.
  • I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame.
  • The Vedas say, "All intelligences awake with the morning."
  • To him whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a perpetual morning.
  • Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout, and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness.
  • Our life is like a German Confederacy, made up of petty states, with its boundary forever fluctuating, so that even a German cannot tell you how it is bounded at any moment.
  • The rails are laid on them, and they are covered with sand, and the cars run smoothly over them.
  • Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life?
  • The messenger answered with respect: My master desires to diminish the number of his faults, but he cannot come to the end of them.
  • If men would steadily observe realities only, and not allow themselves to be deluded, life, to compare it with such things as we know, would be like a fairy tale and the Arabian Nights' Entertainments.
  • Why should we knock under and go with the stream?
  • I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with stars.
  • I do not wish to be any more busy with my hands than is necessary.
  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.
  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.
  • Incessant labor with my hands, at first, for I had my house to finish and my beans to hoe at the same time, made more study impossible.
  • The modern cheap and fertile press, with all its translations, has done little to bring us nearer to the heroic writers of antiquity.
  • However much we may admire the orator's occasional bursts of eloquence, the noblest written words are commonly as far behind or above the fleeting spoken language as the firmament with its stars is behind the clouds.
  • It is something at once more intimate with us and more universal than any other work of art.
  • There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell.
  • One who has just come from reading perhaps one of the best English books will find how many with whom he can converse about it?
  • Alas! what with foddering the cattle and tending the store, we are kept from school too long, and our education is sadly neglected.
  • If we were always, indeed, getting our living, and regulating our lives according to the last and best mode we had learned, we should never be troubled with ennui.
  • When my floor was dirty, I rose early, and, setting all my furniture out of doors on the grass, bed and bedstead making but one budget, dashed water on the floor, and sprinkled white sand from the pond on it, and then with a broom scrubbed it clean and white; and by the time the villagers had broken their fast the morning sun had dried my house sufficiently to allow me to move in again, and my meditations were almost uninterupted.
  • Near the end of May, the sand cherry (Cerasus pumila) adorned the sides of the path with its delicate flowers arranged in umbels cylindrically about its short stems, which last, in the fall, weighed down with good-sized and handsome cherries, fell over in wreaths like rays on every side.
  • With such huge and lumbering civility the country hands a chair to the city.
  • I watch the passage of the morning cars with the same feeling that I do the rising of the sun, which is hardly more regular.
  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.
  • I see these men every day go about their business with more or less courage and content, doing more even than they suspect, and perchance better employed than they could have consciously devised.
  • Next Spanish hides, with the tails still preserving their twist and the angle of elevation they had when the oxen that wore them were careering over the pampas of the Spanish Main--a type of all obstinacy, and evincing how almost hopeless and incurable are all constitutional vices.
  • And hark! here comes the cattle-train bearing the cattle of a thousand hills, sheepcots, stables, and cow-yards in the air, drovers with their sticks, and shepherd boys in the midst of their flocks, all but the mountain pastures, whirled along like leaves blown from the mountains by the September gales.
  • The air is filled with the bleating of calves and sheep, and the hustling of oxen, as if a pastoral valley were going by.
  • A carload of drovers, too, in the midst, on a level with their droves now, their vocation gone, but still clinging to their useless sticks as their badge of office.
  • They would begin to sing almost with as much precision as a clock, within five minutes of a particular time, referred to the setting of the sun, every evening.
  • I had a rare opportunity to become acquainted with their habits.
  • This foreign bird's note is celebrated by the poets of all countries along with the notes of their native songsters.
  • All climates agree with brave Chanticleer.
  • I go and come with a strange liberty in Nature, a part of herself.
  • Though it is now dark, the wind still blows and roars in the wood, the waves still dash, and some creatures lull the rest with their notes.
  • They who come rarely to the woods take some little piece of the forest into their hands to play with by the way, which they leave, either intentionally or accidentally.
  • Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me.
  • In those driving northeast rains which tried the village houses so, when the maids stood ready with mop and pail in front entries to keep the deluge out, I sat behind my door in my little house, which was all entry, and thoroughly enjoyed its protection.
  • Next to us is not the workman whom we have hired, with whom we love so well to talk, but the workman whose work we are.
  • With thinking we may be beside ourselves in a sane sense.
  • To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating.
  • I have heard of a man lost in the woods and dying of famine and exhaustion at the foot of a tree, whose loneliness was relieved by the grotesque visions with which, owing to bodily weakness, his diseased imagination surrounded him, and which he believed to be real.
  • Shall I not have intelligence with the earth?
  • Not my or thy great-grandfather's, but our great-grandmother Nature's universal, vegetable, botanic medicines, by which she has kept herself young always, outlived so many old Parrs in her day, and fed her health with their decaying fatness.
  • Many of our houses, both public and private, with their almost innumerable apartments, their huge halls and their cellars for the storage of wines and other munitions of peace, appear to be extravagantly large for their inhabitants.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • Another time when Winslow visited them, it being a season of plenty with them, there was no deficiency in this respect.
  • He was about twenty-eight years old, and had left Canada and his father's house a dozen years before to work in the States, and earn money to buy a farm with at last, perhaps in his native country.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • Sometimes I saw him at his work in the woods, felling trees, and he would greet me with a laugh of inexpressible satisfaction, and a salutation in Canadian French, though he spoke English as well.
  • Such an exuberance of animal spirits had he that he sometimes tumbled down and rolled on the ground with laughter at anything which made him think and tickled him.
  • I asked him once if he was not sometimes tired at night, after working all day; and he answered, with a sincere and serious look, "Gorrappit, I never was tired in my life."
  • I sometimes found the name of his native parish handsomely written in the snow by the highway, with the proper French accent, and knew that he had passed.
  • It would have suggested many things to a philosopher to have dealings with him.
  • Could he dispense with tea and coffee?
  • May be the man you hoe with is inclined to race; then, by gorry, your mind must be there; you think of weeds.
  • One man, perhaps, if he has got enough, will be satisfied to sit all day with his back to the fire and his belly to the table, by George!
  • With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole.
  • Children come a-berrying, railroad men taking a Sunday morning walk in clean shirts, fishermen and hunters, poets and philosophers; in short, all honest pilgrims, who came out to the woods for freedom's sake, and really left the village behind, I was ready to greet with--"Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!" for I had had communication with that race.
  • Fellow-travellers as they rattled by compared it aloud with the fields which they had passed, so that I came to know how I stood in the agricultural world.
  • As I drew a still fresher soil about the rows with my hoe, I disturbed the ashes of unchronicled nations who in primeval years lived under these heavens, and their small implements of war and hunting were brought to the light of this modern day.
  • It was no longer beans that I hoed, nor I that hoed beans; and I remembered with as much pity as pride, if I remembered at all, my acquaintances who had gone to the city to attend the oratorios.
  • And when the sound died quite away, and the hum had ceased, and the most favorable breezes told no tale, I knew that they had got the last drone of them all safely into the Middlesex hive, and that now their minds were bent on the honey with which it was smeared.
  • I felt proud to know that the liberties of Massachusetts and of our fatherland were in such safe keeping; and as I turned to my hoeing again I was filled with an inexpressible confidence, and pursued my labor cheerfully with a calm trust in the future.
  • When there were several bands of musicians, it sounded as if all the village was a vast bellows and all the buildings expanded and collapsed alternately with a din.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • It was a singular experience that long acquaintance which I cultivated with beans, what with planting, and hoeing, and harvesting, and threshing, and picking over and selling them--the last was the hardest of all--I might add eating, for I did taste.
  • A long war, not with cranes, but with weeds, those Trojans who had sun and rain and dews on their side.
  • Daily the beans saw me come to their rescue armed with a hoe, and thin the ranks of their enemies, filling up the trenches with weedy dead.
  • I saw an old man the other day, to my astonishment, making the holes with a hoe for the seventieth time at least, and not for himself to lie down in!
  • We should never stand upon ceremony with sincerity.
  • I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.
  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
  • I have heard of many going astray even in the village streets, when the darkness was so thick that you could cut it with a knife, as the saying is.
  • In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round--for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost--do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • Sometimes, after staying in a village parlor till the family had all retired, I have returned to the woods, and, partly with a view to the next day's dinner, spent the hours of midnight fishing from a boat by moonlight, serenaded by owls and foxes, and hearing, from time to time, the creaking note of some unknown bird close at hand.
  • Thus I caught two fishes as it were with one hook.
  • I have seen our river, when, the landscape being covered with snow, both water and ice were almost as green as grass.
  • Making another hole directly over it with an ice chisel which I had, and cutting down the longest birch which I could find in the neighborhood with my knife, I made a slip-noose, which I attached to its end, and, letting it down carefully, passed it over the knob of the handle, and drew it by a line along the birch, and so pulled the axe out again.
  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.
  • Flint's Pond, a mile eastward, allowing for the disturbance occasioned by its inlets and outlets, and the smaller intermediate ponds also, sympathize with Walden, and recently attained their greatest height at the same time with the latter.
  • I have in my mind's eye the western, indented with deep bays, the bolder northern, and the beautifully scalloped southern shore, where successive capes overlap each other and suggest unexplored coves between.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • It is wonderful with what elaborateness this simple fact is advertised--this piscine murder will out--and from my distant perch I distinguish the circling undulations when they are half a dozen rods in diameter.
  • Ay, every leaf and twig and stone and cobweb sparkles now at mid-afternoon as when covered with dew in a spring morning.
  • In such a day, in September or October, Walden is a perfect forest mirror, set round with stones as precious to my eye as if fewer or rarer.
  • When I approached carelessly and alarmed them, they made a sudden splash and rippling with their tails, as if one had struck the water with a brushy bough, and instantly took refuge in the depths.
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • He rounded this water with his hand, deepened and clarified it in his thought, and in his will bequeathed it to Concord.
  • Under a high state of cultivation, being manured with the hearts and brains of men!
  • In the spring of '49 I talked with the man who lives nearest the pond in Sudbury, who told me that it was he who got out this tree ten or fifteen years before.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.
  • The birds with their plumage and their notes are in harmony with the flowers, but what youth or maiden conspires with the wild luxuriant beauty of Nature?
  • The gods must be proud, thought I, with such forked flashes to rout a poor unarmed fisherman.
  • We should come home from far, from adventures, and perils, and discoveries every day, with new experience and character.
  • Poor John Field!--I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it--thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country--to catch perch with shiners.
  • Perhaps I have owed to this employment and to hunting, when quite young, my closest acquaintance with Nature.
  • They early introduce us to and detain us in scenery with which otherwise, at that age, we should have little acquaintance.
  • A little bread or a few potatoes would have done as well, with less trouble and filth.
  • Most men would feel shame if caught preparing with their own hands precisely such a dinner, whether of animal or vegetable food, as is every day prepared for them by others.
  • If the day and the night are such that you greet them with joy, and life emits a fragrance like flowers and sweet-scented herbs, is more elastic, more starry, more immortal--that is your success.
  • Yet, for my part, I was never unusually squeamish; I could sometimes eat a fried rat with a good relish, if it were necessary.
  • I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor; and think of dashing the hopes of a morning with a cup of warm coffee, or of an evening with a dish of tea!
  • A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle.
  • Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten.
  • The impure can neither stand nor sit with purity.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • They gently did away with the street, and the village, and the state in which he lived.
  • I will go with you gladly soon, but I am just concluding a serious meditation.
  • Angleworms are rarely to be met with in these parts, where the soil was never fattened with manure; the race is nearly extinct.
  • At length, as I leaned with my elbow on the bench one day, it ran up my clothes, and along my sleeve, and round and round the paper which held my dinner, while I kept the latter close, and dodged and played at bopeep with it; and when at last I held still a piece of cheese between my thumb and finger, it came and nibbled it, sitting in my hand, and afterward cleaned its face and paws, like a fly, and walked away.
  • So perfect is this instinct, that once, when I had laid them on the leaves again, and one accidentally fell on its side, it was found with the rest in exactly the same position ten minutes afterward.
  • Such an eye was not born when the bird was, but is coeval with the sky it reflects.
  • Looking farther, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants, that it was not a duellum, but a bellum, a war between two races of ants, the red always pitted against the black, and frequently two red ones to one black.
  • The legions of these Myrmidons covered all the hills and vales in my wood-yard, and the ground was already strewn with the dead and dying, both red and black.
  • They fought with more pertinacity than bulldogs.
  • Once, when berrying, I met with a cat with young kittens in the woods, quite wild, and they all, like their mother, had their backs up and were fiercely spitting at me.
  • In the fall the loon (Colymbus glacialis) came, as usual, to moult and bathe in the pond, making the woods ring with his wild laughter before I had risen.
  • At rumor of his arrival all the Mill-dam sportsmen are on the alert, in gigs and on foot, two by two and three by three, with patent rifles and conical balls and spy-glasses.
  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
  • I pursued with a paddle and he dived, but when he came up I was nearer than before.
  • He dived again, but I miscalculated the direction he would take, and we were fifty rods apart when he came to the surface this time, for I had helped to widen the interval; and again he laughed long and loud, and with more reason than before.
  • It was surprising to see how serenely he sailed off with unruffled breast when he came to the surface, doing all the work with his webbed feet beneath.
  • In October I went a-graping to the river meadows, and loaded myself with clusters more precious for their beauty and fragrance than for food.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • Each morning, when they were numbed with cold, I swept some of them out, but I did not trouble myself much to get rid of them; I even felt complimented by their regarding my house as a desirable shelter.
  • They never molested me seriously, though they bedded with me; and they gradually disappeared, into what crevices I do not know, avoiding winter and unspeakable cold.
  • My bricks, being second-hand ones, required to be cleaned with a trowel, so that I learned more than usual of the qualities of bricks and trowels.
  • He shared with me the labors of cooking.
  • I had in my cellar a firkin of potatoes, about two quarts of peas with the weevil in them, and on my shelf a little rice, a jug of molasses, and of rye and Indian meal a peck each.
  • In lathing I was pleased to be able to send home each nail with a single blow of the hammer, and it was my ambition to transfer the plaster from the board to the wall neatly and rapidly.
  • There are many furrows in the sand where some creature has travelled about and doubled on its tracks; and, for wrecks, it is strewn with the cases of caddis-worms made of minute grains of white quartz.
  • Being curious to know what position my great bubbles occupied with regard to the new ice, I broke out a cake containing a middling sized one, and turned it bottom upward.
  • The snow had already covered the ground since the 25th of November, and surrounded me suddenly with the scenery of winter.
  • In the course of the summer I had discovered a raft of pitch pine logs with the bark on, pinned together by the Irish when the railroad was built.
  • I amused myself one winter day with sliding this piecemeal across the pond, nearly half a mile, skating behind with one end of a log fifteen feet long on my shoulder, and the other on the ice; or I tied several logs together with a birch withe, and then, with a longer birch or alder which had a hook at the end, dragged them across.
  • Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection.
  • I had an old axe which nobody claimed, with which by spells in winter days, on the sunny side of the house, I played about the stumps which I had got out of my bean-field.
  • Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.
  • But commonly I kindled my fire with the dry leaves of the forest, which I had stored up in my shed before the snow came.
  • It would be easy to cut their threads any time with a little sharper blast from the north.
  • But I could no longer sit and look into the fire, and the pertinent words of a poet recurred to me with new force.
  • In some places, within my own remembrance, the pines would scrape both sides of a chaise at once, and women and children who were compelled to go this way to Lincoln alone and on foot did it with fear, and often ran a good part of the distance.
  • It is now filled with the smooth sumach (Rhus glabra), and one of the earliest species of goldenrod (Solidago stricta) grows there luxuriantly.
  • Here, by the very corner of my field, still nearer to town, Zilpha, a colored woman, had her little house, where she spun linen for the townsfolk, making the Walden Woods ring with her shrill singing, for she had a loud and notable voice.
  • Farther in the woods than any of these, where the road approaches nearest to the pond, Wyman the potter squatted, and furnished his townsmen with earthenware, and left descendants to succeed him.
  • He wore a greatcoat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine.
  • Sometimes the well dent is visible, where once a spring oozed; now dry and tearless grass; or it was covered deep--not to be discovered till some late day--with a flat stone under the sod, when the last of the race departed.
  • What a sorrowful act must that be--the covering up of wells! coincident with the opening of wells of tears.
  • Little did the dusky children think that the puny slip with its two eyes only, which they stuck in the ground in the shadow of the house and daily watered, would root itself so, and outlive them, and house itself in the rear that shaded it, and grown man's garden and orchard, and tell their story faintly to the lone wanderer a half-century after they had grown up and died--blossoming as fair, and smelling as sweet, as in that first spring.
  • Again, perhaps, Nature will try, with me for a first settler, and my house raised last spring to be the oldest in the hamlet.
  • With such reminiscences I repeopled the woods and lulled myself asleep.
  • When the farmers could not get to the woods and swamps with their teams, and were obliged to cut down the shade trees before their houses, and, when the crust was harder, cut off the trees in the swamps, ten feet from the ground, as it appeared the next spring.
  • He could hear me when I moved and cronched the snow with my feet, but could not plainly see me.
  • I too felt a slumberous influence after watching him half an hour, as he sat thus with his eyes half open, like a cat, winged brother of the cat.
  • Sometimes, notwithstanding the snow, when I returned from my walk at evening I crossed the deep tracks of a woodchopper leading from my door, and found his pile of whittlings on the hearth, and my house filled with the odor of his pipe.
  • We talked of rude and simple times, when men sat about large fires in cold, bracing weather, with clear heads; and when other dessert failed, we tried our teeth on many a nut which wise squirrels have long since abandoned, for those which have the thickest shells are commonly empty.
  • His words and attitude always suppose a better state of things than other men are acquainted with, and he will be the last man to be disappointed as the ages revolve.
  • With his hospitable intellect he embraces children, beggars, insane, and scholars, and entertains the thought of all, adding to it commonly some breadth and elegance.
  • Great Expecter! to converse with whom was a New England Night's Entertainment.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • When I crossed Flint's Pond, after it was covered with snow, though I had often paddled about and skated over it, it was so unexpectedly wide and so strange that I could think of nothing but Baffin's Bay.
  • Walden, being like the rest usually bare of snow, or with only shallow and interrupted drifts on it, was my yard where I could walk freely when the snow was nearly two feet deep on a level elsewhere and the villagers were confined to their streets.
  • They passed over the pond toward Fair Haven, seemingly deterred from settling by my light, their commodore honking all the while with a regular beat.
  • I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and had dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.
  • A little flock of these titmice came daily to pick a dinner out of my woodpile, or the crumbs at my door, with faint flitting lisping notes, like the tinkling of icicles in the grass, or else with sprightly day day day, or more rarely, in spring-like days, a wiry summery phe-be from the woodside.
  • In dark winter mornings, or in short winter afternoons, I sometimes heard a pack of hounds threading all the woods with hounding cry and yelp, unable to resist the instinct of the chase, and the note of the hunting-horn at intervals, proving that man was in the rear.
  • And perhaps at evening I see the hunters returning with a single brush trailing from their sleigh for a trophy, seeking their inn.
  • A hunter told me that he once saw a fox pursued by hounds burst out on to Walden when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, run part way across, and then return to the same shore.
  • Still on they came, and now the near woods resounded through all their aisles with their demoniac cry.
  • At length the old hound burst into view with muzzle to the ground, and snapping the air as if possessed, and ran directly to the rock; but, spying the dead fox, she suddenly ceased her hounding as if struck dumb with amazement, and walked round and round him in silence; and one by one her pups arrived, and, like their mother, were sobered into silence by the mystery.
  • At midnight, when there was a moon, I sometimes met with hounds in my path prowling about the woods, which would skulk out of my way, as if afraid, and stand silent amid the bushes till I had passed.
  • When I opened my door in the evening, off they would go with a squeak and a bounce.
  • The snow lying deep on the earth dotted with young pines, and the very slope of the hill on which my house is placed, seemed to say, Forward!
  • Early in the morning, while all things are crisp with frost, men come with fishing-reels and slender lunch, and let down their fine lines through the snowy field to take pickerel and perch; wild men, who instinctively follow other fashions and trust other authorities than their townsmen, and by their goings and comings stitch towns together in parts where else they would be ripped.
  • They never consulted with books, and know and can tell much less than they have done.
  • The latter raises the moss and bark gently with his knife in search of insects; the former lays open logs to their core with his axe, and moss and bark fly far and wide.
  • As I was desirous to recover the long lost bottom of Walden Pond, I surveyed it carefully, before the ice broke up, early in '46, with compass and chain and sounding line.
  • I fathomed it easily with a cod-line and a stone weighing about a pound and a half, and could tell accurately when the stone left the bottom, by having to pull so much harder before the water got underneath to help me.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • No doubt many a smiling valley with its stretching cornfields occupies exactly such a "horrid chasm," from which the waters have receded, though it requires the insight and the far sight of the geologist to convince the unsuspecting inhabitants of this fact.
  • So, probably, the depth of the ocean will be found to be very inconsiderable compared with its breadth.
  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
  • In proportion as the mouth of the cove was wider compared with its length, the water over the bar was deeper compared with that in the basin.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • The particular laws are as our points of view, as, to the traveller, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form.
  • It is true, we are such poor navigators that our thoughts, for the most part, stand off and on upon a harborless coast, are conversant only with the bights of the bays of poesy, or steer for the public ports of entry, and go into the dry docks of science, where they merely refit for this world, and no natural currents concur to individualize them.
  • One has suggested, that if such a "leach-hole" should be found, its connection with the meadow, if any existed, might be proved by conveying some colored powder or sawdust to the mouth of the hole, and then putting a strainer over the spring in the meadow, which would catch some of the particles carried through by the current.
  • Sometimes, also, when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, I saw a double shadow of myself, one standing on the head of the other, one on the ice, the other on the trees or hillside.
  • These ice-cutters are a merry race, full of jest and sport, and when I went among them they were wont to invite me to saw pit-fashion with them, I standing underneath.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • To speak literally, a hundred Irishmen, with Yankee overseers, came from Cambridge every day to get out the ice.
  • This heap, made in the winter of '46-7 and estimated to contain ten thousand tons, was finally covered with hay and boards; and though it was unroofed the following July, and a part of it carried off, the rest remaining exposed to the sun, it stood over that summer and the next winter, and was not quite melted till September, 1848.
  • So the hollows about this pond will, sometimes, in the winter, be filled with a greenish water somewhat like its own, but the next day will have frozen blue.
  • In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagvat-Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions.
  • Ice has its grain as well as wood, and when a cake begins to rot or "comb," that is, assume the appearance of honeycomb, whatever may be its position, the air cells are at right angles with what was the water surface.
  • One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
  • In the right stage of the weather a pond fires its evening gun with great regularity.
  • The earth is all alive and covered with papillae.
  • When the warmer days come, they who dwell near the river hear the ice crack at night with a startling whoop as loud as artillery, as if its icy fetters were rent from end to end, and within a few days see it rapidly going out.
  • So the alligator comes out of the mud with quakings of the earth.
  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
  • The material was sand of every degree of fineness and of various rich colors, commonly mixed with a little clay.
  • Innumerable little streams overlap and interlace one with another, exhibiting a sort of hybrid product, which obeys half way the law of currents, and half way that of vegetation.
  • The whole cut impressed me as if it were a cave with its stalactites laid open to the light.
  • The whole bank, which is from twenty to forty feet high, is sometimes overlaid with a mass of this kind of foliage, or sandy rupture, for a quarter of a mile on one or both sides, the produce of one spring day.
  • No wonder that the earth expresses itself outwardly in leaves, it so labors with the idea inwardly.
  • Even ice begins with delicate crystal leaves, as if it had flowed into moulds which the fronds of waterplants have impressed on the watery mirror.
  • Is not the hand a spreading palm leaf with its lobes and veins?
  • The ear may be regarded, fancifully, as a lichen, Umbilicaria, on the side of the head, with its lobe or drop.
  • The year beginning with younger hope than ever!
  • It is almost identical with that, for in the growing days of June, when the rills are dry, the grass-blades are their channels, and from year to year the herds drink at this perennial green stream, and the mower draws from it betimes their winter supply.
  • Suddenly an influx of light filled my house, though the evening was at hand, and the clouds of winter still overhung it, and the eaves were dripping with sleety rain.
  • But when I stood on the shore they at once rose up with a great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty-nine of them, and then steered straight to Canada, with a regular honk from the leader at intervals, trusting to break their fast in muddier pools.
  • For a week I heard the circling, groping clangor of some solitary goose in the foggy mornings, seeking its companion, and still peopling the woods with the sound of a larger life than they could sustain.
  • In almost all climes the tortoise and the frog are among the precursors and heralds of this season, and birds fly with song and glancing plumage, and plants spring and bloom, and winds blow, to correct this slight oscillation of the poles and preserve the equilibrium of nature.
  • This sight reminded me of falconry and what nobleness and poetry are associated with that sport.
  • It appeared to have no companion in the universe--sporting there alone--and to need none but the morning and the ether with which it played.
  • The tenant of the air, it seemed related to the earth but by an egg hatched some time in the crevice of a crag;--or was its native nest made in the angle of a cloud, woven of the rainbow's trimmings and the sunset sky, and lined with some soft midsummer haze caught up from earth?
  • I love to see that Nature is so rife with life that myriads can be afforded to be sacrificed and suffered to prey on one another; that tender organizations can be so serenely squashed out of existence like pulp--tadpoles which herons gobble up, and tortoises and toads run over in the road; and that sometimes it has rained flesh and blood!
  • With the liability to accident, we must see how little account is to be made of it.
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • Even in Calidas' drama of Sacontala, we read of "rills dyed yellow with the golden dust of the lotus."
  • Even the bison, to some extent, keeps pace with the seasons cropping the pastures of the Colorado only till a greener and sweeter grass awaits him by the Yellowstone.
  • They love the soil which makes their graves, but have no sympathy with the spirit which may still animate their clay.
  • The surface of the earth is soft and impressible by the feet of men; and so with the paths which the mind travels.
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Sometimes we are inclined to class those who are once-and-a-half-witted with the half-witted, because we appreciate only a third part of their wit.
  • Some would find fault with the morning red, if they ever got up early enough.
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • Some are dinning in our ears that we Americans, and moderns generally, are intellectual dwarfs compared with the ancients, or even the Elizabethan men.
  • If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
  • Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
  • He had made a new system in making a staff, a world with full and fair proportions; in which, though the old cities and dynasties had passed away, fairer and more glorious ones had taken their places.
  • So it is with the bogs and quicksands of society; but he is an old boy that knows it.
  • Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction--a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
  • The style, the house and grounds and "entertainment" pass for nothing with me.
  • This generation inclines a little to congratulate itself on being the last of an illustrious line; and in Boston and London and Paris and Rome, thinking of its long descent, it speaks of its progress in art and science and literature with satisfaction.
  • We are acquainted with a mere pellicle of the globe on which we live.
  • There are such words as joy and sorrow, but they are only the burden of a psalm, sung with a nasal twang, while we believe in the ordinary and mean.
  • Others, as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers, and office-holders, serve the state chiefly with their heads; and, as they rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as likely to serve the devil, without intending it, as God.
  • A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men, serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated as enemies by it.
  • I answer, that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.
  • Paley, a common authority with many on moral questions, in his chapter on the "Duty of Submission to Civil Government," resolves all civil obligation into expediency; and he proceeds to say that "so long as the interest of the whole society requires it, that is, so long as the established government cannot be resisted or changed without public inconveniency, it is the will of God... that the established government be obeyed, and no longer....
  • I quarrel not with far-off foes, but with those who, near at home, co-operate with, and do the bidding of those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
  • They hesitate, and they regret, and sometimes they petition; but they do nothing in earnest and with effect.
  • All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.
  • Action from principle--the perception and the performance of right--changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was.
  • To such the State renders comparatively small service, and a slight tax is wont to appear exorbitant, particularly if they are obliged to earn it by special labor with their hands.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • It seemed to me that I never had heard the town-clock strike before, nor the evening sounds of the village; for we slept with the windows open, which were inside the grating.
  • In fact, I quietly declare war with the State, after my fashion, though I will still make what use and get what advantage of her I can, as is usual in such cases.
  • If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.
  • Webster never goes behind government, and so cannot speak with authority about it.
  • Truth is always in harmony with herself, and is not concerned chiefly to reveal the justice that may consist with wrong-doing.
  • Associations formed elsewhere, springing from a feeling of humanity, or any other cause, have nothing whatever to do with it.
  • But I warn you, if you don't tell me that this means war, if you still try to defend the infamies and horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist--I really believe he is Antichrist--I will have nothing more to do with you and you are no longer my friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you call yourself!
  • With these words she greeted Prince Vasili Kuragin, a man of high rank and importance, who was the first to arrive at her reception.
  • If you have nothing better to do, Count (or Prince), and if the prospect of spending an evening with a poor invalid is not too terrible, I shall be very charmed to see you tonight between 7 and 10--Annette Scherer.
  • Anna Pavlovna Scherer on the contrary, despite her forty years, overflowed with animation and impulsiveness.
  • She added that Her Majesty had deigned to show Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again her face clouded over with sadness.
  • Don't joke; I mean to have a serious talk with you.
  • If you were not a father there would be nothing I could reproach you with, said Anna Pavlovna, looking up pensively.
  • Prince Vasili's son, Hippolyte, had come with Mortemart, whom he introduced.
  • Each visitor performed the ceremony of greeting this old aunt whom not one of them knew, not one of them wanted to know, and not one of them cared about.
  • And each visitor, though politeness prevented his showing impatience, left the old woman with a sense of relief at having performed a vexatious duty and did not return to her the whole evening.
  • As is always the case with a thoroughly attractive woman, her defect--the shortness of her upper lip and her half-open mouth--seemed to be her own special and peculiar form of beauty.
  • The little princess went round the table with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself and to all around her.
  • And she spread out her arms to show her short-waisted, lace-trimmed, dainty gray dress, girdled with a broad ribbon just below the breast.
  • One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily built young man with close-cropped hair, spectacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown dress coat.
  • Anna Pavlovna greeted him with the nod she accorded to the lowest hierarchy in her drawing room.
  • "It is very good of you, Monsieur Pierre, to come and visit a poor invalid," said Anna Pavlovna, exchanging an alarmed glance with her aunt as she conducted him to her.
  • On his way to the aunt he bowed to the little princess with a pleased smile, as to an intimate acquaintance.
  • Anna Pavlovna in dismay detained him with the words: Do you know the Abbe Morio?
  • With his head bent, and his big feet spread apart, he began explaining his reasons for thinking the abbe's plan chimerical.
  • "We will talk of it later," said Anna Pavlovna with a smile.
  • The vicomte was a nice-looking young man with soft features and polished manners, who evidently considered himself a celebrity but out of politeness modestly placed himself at the disposal of the circle in which he found himself.
  • She rose with the same unchanging smile with which she had first entered the room--the smile of a perfectly beautiful woman.
  • "Charming!" said Anna Pavlovna with an inquiring glance at the little princess.
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.
  • Pierre had managed to start a conversation with the abbe about the balance of power, and the latter, evidently interested by the young man's simple-minded eagerness, was explaining his pet theory.
  • He was a very handsome young man, of medium height, with firm, clearcut features.
  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.
  • Pierre, who from the moment Prince Andrew entered the room had watched him with glad, affectionate eyes, now came up and took his arm.
  • I will come to supper with you.
  • Pierre gazed at her with rapturous, almost frightened, eyes as she passed him.
  • You are on good terms with Michael Ilarionovich Kutuzov... recommend Boris to him as adjutant!
  • Prince Andrew looked Anna Pavlovna straight in the face with a sarcastic smile.
  • He explained this to her with as much gravity as if she had asked him to do it.
  • "Bonaparte has said so," remarked Prince Andrew with a sarcastic smile.
  • "Capital!" said Prince Hippolyte in English, and began slapping his knee with the palm of his hand.
  • "Rousseau's Contrat Social," said the vicomte with a tolerant smile.
  • Prince Andrew kept looking with an amused smile from Pierre to the vicomte and from the vicomte to their hostess.
  • Here Prince Hippolyte paused, evidently collecting his ideas with difficulty.
  • She said, 'Girl,' to the maid, 'put on a livery, get up behind the carriage, and come with me while I make some calls.'
  • Stout, about the average height, broad, with huge red hands; he did not know, as the saying is, how to enter a drawing room and still less how to leave one; that is, how to say something particularly agreeable before going away.
  • Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife's chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
  • They listened to the French sentences which to them were meaningless, with an air of understanding but not wishing to appear to do so.
  • The princess as usual spoke smilingly and listened with a laugh.
  • "Princesse, au revoir," cried he, stumbling with his tongue as well as with his feet.
  • One has to know how to deal with them.
  • Pierre sat up on the sofa, with his legs tucked under him.
  • And I am still arguing with your husband.
  • I can't understand why he wants to go to the war, replied Pierre, addressing the princess with none of the embarrassment so commonly shown by young men in their intercourse with young women.
  • "With my father and sister, remember," said Prince Andrew gently.
  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.
  • The princess is too kind to wish to deprive me of the pleasure of spending the evening with you.
  • "Mon Dieu, mon Dieu!" she muttered, and lifting her dress with one hand she went up to her husband and kissed him on the forehead.
  • Pierre continually glanced at Prince Andrew; Prince Andrew rubbed his forehead with his small hand.
  • "Let us go and have supper," he said with a sigh, going to the door.
  • Don't look at me with such surprise.
  • Every muscle of his thin face was now quivering with nervous excitement; his eyes, in which the fire of life had seemed extinguished, now flashed with brilliant light.
  • But tie yourself up with a woman and, like a chained convict, you lose all freedom!
  • And all you have of hope and strength merely weighs you down and torments you with regret.
  • Three others were romping with a young bear, one pulling him by the chain and trying to set him at the others.
  • "Jacob, bring a bottle!" shouted the host, a tall, handsome fellow who stood in the midst of the group, without a coat, and with his fine linen shirt unfastened in front.
  • Another voice, from a man of medium height with clear blue eyes, particularly striking among all these drunken voices by its sober ring, cried from the window: "Come here; part the bets!"
  • This was Dolokhov, an officer of the Semenov regiment, a notorious gambler and duelist, who was living with Anatole.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • Dolokhov was of medium height, with curly hair and light-blue eyes.
  • Anatole with his swaggering air strode up to the window.
  • Pierre seized the crossbeam, tugged, and wrenched the oak frame out with a crash.
  • "Wait!" cried Dolokhov, hammering with the bottle on the window sill to attract attention.
  • One man, older than the others present, suddenly pushed forward with a scared and angry look and wanted to seize hold of Dolokhov's shirt.
  • Dolokhov turned round and, again holding on with both hands, arranged himself on his seat.
  • Anatole stood erect with staring eyes.
  • The man who had wished to stop the affair ran to a corner of the room and threw himself on a sofa with his face to the wall.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • As he began slipping down, his head and arm wavered still more with the strain.
  • He looked up: Dolokhov was standing on the window sill, with a pale but radiant face.
  • Gentlemen, who wishes to bet with me?
  • And we'll take Bruin with us.
  • The matter was mentioned to the Emperor, an exception made, and Boris transferred into the regiment of Semenov Guards with the rank of cornet.
  • The countess herself and her handsome eldest daughter were in the drawing-room with the visitors who came to congratulate, and who constantly succeeded one another in relays.
  • The countess was a woman of about forty-five, with a thin Oriental type of face, evidently worn out with childbearing--she had had twelve.
  • The countess reflected a moment and took a pinch from a gold snuffbox with her husband's portrait on it.
  • A tall, stout, and proud-looking woman, with a round-faced smiling daughter, entered the drawing room, their dresses rustling.
  • Those three got hold of a bear somewhere, put it in a carriage, and set off with it to visit some actresses!
  • And there was the bear swimming about with the policeman on his back!
  • "What a nice figure the policeman must have cut, my dear!" shouted the count, dying with laughter.
  • The visitor made a gesture with her hand.
  • And as he waved his arms to impersonate the policeman, his portly form again shook with a deep ringing laugh, the laugh of one who always eats well and, in particular, drinks well.
  • "So do come and dine with us!" he said.
  • "Ma chere, there is a time for everything," said the countess with feigned severity.
  • "Now then, go away and take your monstrosity with you," said the mother, pushing away her daughter with pretended sternness, and turning to the visitor she added: "She is my youngest girl."
  • Nicholas was short with curly hair and an open expression.
  • Do you want the carriage? he asked his mother with a smile.
  • Sonya was a slender little brunette with a tender look in her eyes which were veiled by long lashes, thick black plaits coiling twice round her head, and a tawny tint in her complexion and especially in the color of her slender but graceful and muscular arms and neck.
  • He glanced at his cousin and the young lady visitor; and they were both regarding him with a smile of approbation.
  • Schubert, the colonel of the Pavlograd Hussars, is dining with us today.
  • As he spoke he kept glancing with the flirtatiousness of a handsome youth at Sonya and the young lady visitor.
  • He waited for the first pause in the conversation, and then with a distressed face left the room to find Sonya.
  • And she's in love with Boris already.
  • Just fancy!" said the countess with a gentle smile, looking at Boris and went on, evidently concerned with a thought that always occupied her: "Now you see if I were to be severe with her and to forbid it... goodness knows what they might be up to on the sly" (she meant that they would be kissing), "but as it is, I know every word she utters.
  • With her elder sister I was stricter.
  • "Yes, I was brought up quite differently," remarked the handsome elder daughter, Countess Vera, with a smile.
  • "People are always too clever with their eldest children and try to make something exceptional of them," said the visitor.
  • Our dear countess was too clever with Vera, said the count.
  • Sonya, what is the matter with you?
  • "Boris, come here," said she with a sly and significant look.
  • You are in love with me?
  • She took his arm and with a happy face went with him into the adjoining sitting room.
  • The countess wished to have a tête-à-tête talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with her tear-worn but pleasant face, drew her chair nearer to that of the countess.
  • "With you I will be quite frank," said Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Sonya and Natasha looked at Vera with guilty, happy faces.
  • She lingered in the room with the inkstand in her hand.
  • We don't interfere with you and Berg.
  • But I'll just tell Mamma how you are behaving with Boris.
  • Go and flirt with Berg as much as you please, she finished quickly.
  • "Ah, my love," answered Anna Mikhaylovna, "God grant you never know what it is to be left a widow without means and with a son you love to distraction!
  • One learns many things then, she added with a certain pride.
  • He paid me attentions in those days, said the countess, with a smile.
  • "He is just the same as ever," replied Anna Mikhaylovna, "overflowing with amiability.
  • The countess' eyes filled with tears and she pondered in silence.
  • And like a practical Petersburg lady who knows how to make the most of time, Anna Mikhaylovna sent someone to call her son, and went into the anteroom with him.
  • He has been to the house, you know, and danced with the children.
  • "Prince, humanum est errare, * but..." replied the doctor, swallowing his r's, and pronouncing the Latin words with a French accent.
  • Seeing Anna Mikhaylovna and her son, Prince Vasili dismissed the doctor with a bow and approached them silently and with a look of inquiry.
  • "Try to serve well and show yourself worthy," added he, addressing Boris with severity.
  • Are you living with your mother?
  • "That is, with Ilya Rostov who married Nataly Shinshina," said Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • A door of one of the inner rooms opened and one of the princesses, the count's niece, entered with a cold, stern face.
  • The eldest princess paused in her reading and silently stared at him with frightened eyes; the second assumed precisely the same expression; while the youngest, the one with the mole, who was of a cheerful and lively disposition, bent over her frame to hide a smile probably evoked by the amusing scene she foresaw.
  • And he left the room, followed by the low but ringing laughter of the sister with the mole.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • "Do you remember me?" asked Boris quietly with a pleasant smile.
  • I have come with my mother to see the count, but it seems he is not well.
  • Do you remember how we went to the Sparrow Hills with Madame Jacquot?...
  • "You are mistaken," said Boris deliberately, with a bold and slightly sarcastic smile.
  • "We here in Moscow are more occupied with dinner parties and scandal than with politics," said he in his quiet ironical tone.
  • Moscow is chiefly busy with gossip, he continued.
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • "And so you think Napoleon will manage to get an army across?" asked Boris with a smile.
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • After Anna Mikhaylovna had driven off with her son to visit Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov, Countess Rostova sat for a long time all alone applying her handkerchief to her eyes.
  • "What is the matter with you, my dear?" she said crossly to the maid who kept her waiting some minutes.
  • The count came waddling in to see his wife with a rather guilty look as usual.
  • "It's the saute, most likely," she added with a smile.
  • "What a treasure that Dmitri is," added the count with a smile when the young man had departed.
  • There is never any 'impossible' with him.
  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.
  • One of them was a sallow, clean-shaven civilian with a thin and wrinkled face, already growing old, though he was dressed like a most fashionable young man.
  • This was an old bachelor, Shinshin, a cousin of the countess', a man with "a sharp tongue" as they said in Moscow society.
  • The latter, a fresh, rosy officer of the Guards, irreproachably washed, brushed, and buttoned, held his pipe in the middle of his mouth and with red lips gently inhaled the smoke, letting it escape from his handsome mouth in rings.
  • This was Lieutenant Berg, an officer in the Semenov regiment with whom Boris was to travel to join the army, and about whom Natasha had teased her elder sister Vera, speaking of Berg as her "intended."
  • "Well, then, old chap, mon tres honorable Alphonse Karlovich," said Shinshin, laughing ironically and mixing the most ordinary Russian expressions with the choicest French phrases--which was a peculiarity of his speech.
  • Berg always spoke quietly, politely, and with great precision.
  • Then just think what can be done with two hundred and thirty rubles!
  • The countess exchanged glances with Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • The other guests were all conversing with one another.
  • Tall and stout, holding high her fifty-year-old head with its gray curls, she stood surveying the guests, and leisurely arranged her wide sleeves as if rolling them up.
  • Nowhere to hunt with your dogs?
  • She took a pair of pear-shaped ruby earrings from her huge reticule and, having given them to the rosy Natasha, who beamed with the pleasure of her saint's-day fete, turned away at once and addressed herself to Pierre.
  • The smiling Julie Karagina went in with Nicholas.
  • At one end of the table sat the countess with Marya Dmitrievna on her right and Anna Mikhaylovna on her left, the other lady visitors were farther down.
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.
  • Berg with tender smiles was saying to Vera that love is not an earthly but a heavenly feeling.
  • Boris was telling his new friend Pierre who the guests were and exchanging glances with Natasha, who was sitting opposite.
  • Of the two soups he chose turtle with savory patties and went on to the game without omitting a single dish or one of the wines.
  • Of the four crystal glasses engraved with the count's monogram that stood before his plate, Pierre held out one at random and drank with enjoyment, gazing with ever- increasing amiability at the other guests.
  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.
  • Nicholas sat at some distance from Sonya, beside Julie Karagina, to whom he was again talking with the same involuntary smile.
  • The German tutor was trying to remember all the dishes, wines, and kinds of dessert, in order to send a full description of the dinner to his people in Germany; and he felt greatly offended when the butler with a bottle wrapped in a napkin passed him by.
  • Then with the unerring official memory that characterized him he repeated from the opening words of the manifesto:
  • Sonya and fat little Petya doubled up with laughter.
  • The band again struck up, the count and countess kissed, and the guests, leaving their seats, went up to "congratulate" the countess, and reached across the table to clink glasses with the count, with the children, and with one another.
  • Again the footmen rushed about, chairs scraped, and in the same order in which they had entered but with redder faces, the guests returned to the drawing room and to the count's study.
  • The count, holding his cards fanwise, kept himself with difficulty from dropping into his usual after-dinner nap, and laughed at everything.
  • After she had played a little air with variations on the harp, she joined the other young ladies in begging Natasha and Nicholas, who were noted for their musical talent, to sing something.
  • With an effort Sonya sat up and began wiping her eyes and explaining.
  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"
  • The little kitten brightened, its eyes shone, and it seemed ready to lift its tail, jump down on its soft paws, and begin playing with the ball of worsted as a kitten should.
  • Sonya, shaking off some down which clung to her and tucking away the verses in the bosom of her dress close to her bony little chest, ran after Natasha down the passage into the sitting room with flushed face and light, joyous steps.
  • At the visitors' request the young people sang the quartette, "The Brook," with which everyone was delighted.
  • While the couples were arranging themselves and the musicians tuning up, Pierre sat down with his little partner.
  • Natasha was perfectly happy; she was dancing with a grown-up man, who had been abroad.
  • Assuming quite the pose of a society woman (heaven knows when and where she had learned it) she talked with her partner, fanning herself and smiling over the fan.
  • First came Marya Dmitrievna and the count, both with merry countenances.
  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.
  • And indeed everybody in the room looked with a smile of pleasure at the jovial old gentleman, who standing beside his tall and stout partner, Marya Dmitrievna, curved his arms, beat time, straightened his shoulders, turned out his toes, tapped gently with his foot, and, by a smile that broadened his round face more and more, prepared the onlookers for what was to follow.
  • As soon as the provocatively gay strains of Daniel Cooper (somewhat resembling those of a merry peasant dance) began to sound, all the doorways of the ballroom were suddenly filled by the domestic serfs--the men on one side and the women on the other--who with beaming faces had come to see their master making merry.
  • Both partners stood still, breathing heavily and wiping their faces with their cambric handkerchiefs.
  • Everyone stood up respectfully when the Military Governor, having stayed about half an hour alone with the dying man, passed out, slightly acknowledging their bows and trying to escape as quickly as possible from the glances fixed on him by the doctors, clergy, and relatives of the family.
  • When the Military Governor had gone, Prince Vasili sat down all alone on a chair in the ballroom, crossing one leg high over the other, leaning his elbow on his knee and covering his face with his hand.
  • After sitting so for a while he rose, and, looking about him with frightened eyes, went with unusually hurried steps down the long corridor leading to the back of the house, to the room of the eldest princess.
  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.
  • "Yes, indeed," replied the princess with a sigh.
  • "It von't go begging," replied the German with a smile.
  • Everyone again looked toward the door, which creaked as the second princess went in with the drink she had prepared according to Lorrain's instructions.
  • "Tonight, not later," said he in a low voice, and he moved away with a decorous smile of self-satisfaction at being able clearly to understand and state the patient's condition.
  • The room was crowded with small pieces of furniture, whatnots, cupboards, and little tables.
  • She rose and smoothed her hair, which was as usual so extremely smooth that it seemed to be made of one piece with her head and covered with varnish.
  • "I thought perhaps something had happened," she said with her unchanging stonily severe expression; and, sitting down opposite the prince, she prepared to listen.
  • Then she shook her head and glanced up at the icons with a sigh.
  • The princess, holding her little dog on her lap with her thin bony hands, looked attentively into Prince Vasili's eyes evidently resolved not to be the first to break silence, if she had to wait till morning.
  • The princess continued to look at him without moving, and with the same dull expression.
  • "I know the will was made, but I also know that it is invalid; and you, mon cousin, seem to consider me a perfect fool," said the princess with the expression women assume when they suppose they are saying something witty and stinging.
  • "My dear Princess Catherine Semenovna," began Prince Vasili impatiently, "I came here not to wrangle with you, but to talk about your interests as with a kinswoman, a good, kind, true relation.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • Rousing himself, Pierre followed Anna Mikhaylovna out of the carriage, and only then began to think of the interview with his dying father which awaited him.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, addressing a maid who was hurrying past with a decanter on a tray as "my dear" and "my sweet," asked about the princess' health and then led Pierre along a stone passage.
  • Seeing them pass, Prince Vasili drew back with obvious impatience, while the princess jumped up and with a gesture of desperation slammed the door with all her might.
  • They were met by a deacon with a censer and by a servant who passed out on tiptoe without heeding them.
  • They went into the reception room familiar to Pierre, with two Italian windows opening into the conservatory, with its large bust and full length portrait of Catherine the Great.
  • With the air of a practical Petersburg lady she now, keeping Pierre close beside her, entered the room even more boldly than that afternoon.
  • She felt that as she brought with her the person the dying man wished to see, her own admission was assured.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna with just the same movement raised her shoulders and eyes, almost closing the latter, sighed, and moved away from the doctor to Pierre.
  • As soon as Anna Mikhaylovna had disappeared he noticed that the eyes of all in the room turned to him with something more than curiosity and sympathy.
  • He noticed that they whispered to one another, casting significant looks at him with a kind of awe and even servility.
  • Not two minutes had passed before Prince Vasili with head erect majestically entered the room.
  • He was wearing his long coat with three stars on his breast.
  • Pierre well knew this large room divided by columns and an arch, its walls hung round with Persian carpets.
  • The part of the room behind the columns, with a high silk-curtained mahogany bedstead on one side and on the other an immense case containing icons, was brightly illuminated with red light like a Russian church during evening service.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with a meek, sorrowful, and all-forgiving expression on her face, stood by the door near the strange lady.
  • Prince Vasili in front of the door, near the invalid chair, a wax taper in his left hand, was leaning his left arm on the carved back of a velvet chair he had turned round for the purpose, and was crossing himself with his right hand, turning his eyes upward each time he touched his forehead.
  • He lit it and, distracted by observing those around him, began crossing himself with the hand that held the taper.
  • Sophie, the rosy, laughter-loving, youngest princess with the mole, watched him.
  • She smiled, hid her face in her handkerchief, and remained with it hidden for awhile; then looking up and seeing Pierre she again began to laugh.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • But now this head was swaying helplessly with the uneven movements of the bearers, and the cold listless gaze fixed itself upon nothing.
  • He lay with his head propped high on the pillows.
  • When Pierre came up the count was gazing straight at him, but with a look the significance of which could not be understood by mortal man.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna made a hurried sign with her eyes, glancing at the sick man's hand and moving her lips as if to send it a kiss.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna with her eyes indicated a chair that stood beside the bed.
  • The sick man was turned on to his side with his face to the wall.
  • Pierre went with Anna Mikhaylovna into the small drawing room.
  • Pierre well remembered this small circular drawing room with its mirrors and little tables.
  • Intriguer! she hissed viciously, and tugged with all her might at the portfolio.
  • "Oh!" said he with reproach and surprise, "this is absurd!
  • Here, Pierre, tell them your opinion, said she, turning to the young man who, having come quite close, was gazing with astonishment at the angry face of the princess which had lost all dignity, and at the twitching cheeks of Prince Vasili.
  • He is dying and you leave me alone with him!
  • A few minutes later the eldest sister came out with a pale hard face, again biting her underlip.
  • He staggered to the sofa on which Pierre was sitting and dropped onto it, covering his face with his hand.
  • She approached Pierre with slow, quiet steps.
  • She kissed the young man on his forehead, wetting him with her tears.
  • Come, I will go with you.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna left him, and when she returned he was fast asleep with his head on his arm.
  • After her talk with Pierre, Anna Mikhaylovna returned to the Rostovs' and went to bed.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • The large table covered with books and plans, the tall glass-fronted bookcases with keys in the locks, the high desk for writing while standing up, on which lay an open exercise book, and the lathe with tools laid ready to hand and shavings scattered around--all indicated continuous, varied, and orderly activity.
  • He took the exercise book containing lessons in geometry written by himself and drew up a chair with his foot.
  • "For tomorrow!" said he, quickly finding the page and making a scratch from one paragraph to another with his hard nail.
  • "From Heloise?" asked the prince with a cold smile that showed his still sound, yellowish teeth.
  • "Yes, it's from Julie," replied the princess with a timid glance and a timid smile.
  • "This won't do, Princess; it won't do," said he, when Princess Mary, having taken and closed the exercise book with the next day's lesson, was about to leave: "Mathematics are most important, madam!
  • She turned to go, but he stopped her with a gesture and took an uncut book from the high desk.
  • I don't interfere with anyone's belief...
  • Princess Mary went back to her room with the sad, scared expression that rarely left her and which made her plain, sickly face yet plainer.
  • She sat down at her writing table, on which stood miniature portraits and which was littered with books and papers.
  • Her eyes, always sad, now looked with particular hopelessness at her reflection in the glass.
  • As with everyone, her face assumed a forced unnatural expression as soon as she looked in a glass.
  • One of my two brothers is already abroad, the other is with the Guards, who are starting on their march to the frontier.
  • The princess pondered awhile with a thoughtful smile and her luminous eyes lit up so that her face was entirely transformed.
  • Then she suddenly rose and with her heavy tread went up to the table.
  • On such matters I am only severe with myself.
  • I cannot agree with you about Pierre, whom I knew as a child.
  • So young, and burdened with such riches--to what temptations he will be exposed!
  • I have had a letter from my brother, who announces his speedy arrival at Bald Hills with his wife.
  • I have written to my poor mother, said the smiling Mademoiselle Bourienne rapidly, in her pleasant mellow tones and with guttural r's.
  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.
  • Just then a closed carriage and another with a hood drove up to the porch.
  • "Why, this is a palace!" she said to her husband, looking around with the expression with which people compliment their host at a ball.
  • And with a glance round, she smiled at Tikhon, at her husband, and at the footman who accompanied them.
  • Prince Andrew followed her with a courteous but sad expression.
  • Before they reached the room from which the sounds of the clavichord came, the pretty, fair haired Frenchwoman, Mademoiselle Bourienne, rushed out apparently beside herself with delight.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne stood near them pressing her hand to her heart, with a beatific smile and obviously equally ready to cry or to laugh.
  • Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure.
  • "She needs rest," said Prince Andrew with a frown.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • "Yes, Father, I have come to you and brought my wife who is pregnant," said Prince Andrew, following every movement of his father's face with an eager and respectful look.
  • God has nothing to do with it!
  • "Give me time to collect my wits, Father," said he, with a smile that showed that his father's foibles did not prevent his son from loving and honoring him.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • Everything her father did inspired her with reverence and was beyond question.
  • Fancy, with his powerful mind, indulging in such nonsense!
  • The prince walked in quickly and jauntily as was his wont, as if intentionally contrasting the briskness of his manners with the strict formality of his house.
  • At that moment the great clock struck two and another with a shrill tone joined in from the drawing room.
  • He laughed in his usual dry, cold, unpleasant way, with his lips only and not with his eyes.
  • Prince Andrew gaily bore with his father's ridicule of the new men, and drew him on and listened to him with evident pleasure.
  • Buonaparte was born with a silver spoon in his mouth.
  • "Dieu sait quand reviendra..." hummed the prince out of tune and, with a laugh still more so, he quitted the table.
  • The little princess during the whole discussion and the rest of the dinner sat silent, glancing with a frightened look now at her father-in- law and now at Princess Mary.
  • Only those things he always kept with him remained in his room; a small box, a large canteen fitted with silver plate, two Turkish pistols and a saber--a present from his father who had brought it from the siege of Ochakov.
  • All these traveling effects of Prince Andrew's were in very good order: new, clean, and in cloth covers carefully tied with tapes.
  • With his hands behind him he paced briskly from corner to corner of the room, looking straight before him and thoughtfully shaking his head.
  • You are not angry with me for coming?
  • And I am so contented and happy with him.
  • Andrew, I bless you with this icon and you must promise me you will never take it off.
  • Know this, Masha: I can't reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • On the way to his sister's room, in the passage which connected one wing with the other, Prince Andrew met Mademoiselle Bourienne smiling sweetly.
  • It was the third time that day that, with an ecstatic and artless smile, she had met him in secluded passages.
  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.
  • No, but imagine the old Countess Zubova, with false curls and her mouth full of false teeth, as if she were trying to cheat old age....
  • The little princess, plump and rosy, was sitting in an easy chair with her work in her hands, talking incessantly, repeating Petersburg reminiscences and even phrases.
  • The coach with six horses was waiting at the porch.
  • Servants with lanterns were bustling about in the porch.
  • The immense house was brilliant with lights shining through its lofty windows.
  • He signed with a flourish and suddenly turning to his son began to laugh.
  • He seized his son by the hand with small bony fingers, shook it, looked straight into his son's face with keen eyes which seemed to see through him, and again laughed his frigid laugh.
  • The old man continued to fold and seal his letter, snatching up and throwing down the wax, the seal, and the paper, with his accustomed rapidity.
  • He led him to the desk, raised the lid, drew out a drawer, and took out an exercise book filled with his bold, tall, close handwriting.
  • "You need not have said that to me, Father," said the son with a smile.
  • "Andrew, already!" said the little princess, turning pale and looking with dismay at her husband.
  • "Adieu, Mary," said he gently to his sister, taking her by the hand and kissing her, and then he left the room with rapid steps.
  • Princess Mary, supporting her sister-in-law, still looked with her beautiful eyes full of tears at the door through which Prince Andrew had gone and made the sign of the cross in his direction.
  • The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
  • With this object he intended to meet the regiment; so the worse the condition it was in, the better pleased the commander- in-chief would be.
  • On hearing this the regimental commander hung his head, silently shrugged his shoulders, and spread out his arms with a choleric gesture.
  • On all sides soldiers were running to and fro, throwing up their knapsacks with a jerk of their shoulders and pulling the straps over their heads, unstrapping their overcoats and drawing the sleeves on with upraised arms.
  • The regimental commander walked with his jerky steps to the front of the regiment and examined it from a distance.
  • What is this? shouted the regimental commander, thrusting forward his jaw and pointing at a soldier in the ranks of the third company in a greatcoat of bluish cloth, which contrasted with the others.
  • Whom have you got there dressed up as a Hungarian? said the commander with an austere gibe.
  • What?" he added with renewed irritation, "I beg you to dress your men decently."
  • Your leg? shouted the commander with a tone of suffering in his voice, while there were still five men between him and Dolokhov with his bluish-gray uniform.
  • Dolokhov slowly straightened his bent knee, looking straight with his clear, insolent eyes in the general's face.
  • The word of command rang out, and again the regiment quivered, as with a jingling sound it presented arms.
  • Thanks to the strictness and assiduity of its commander the regiment, in comparison with others that had reached Braunau at the same time, was in splendid condition.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • Beside him was his comrade Nesvitski, a tall staff officer, extremely stout, with a kindly, smiling, handsome face and moist eyes.
  • This hussar, with a grave face and without a smile or a change in the expression of his fixed eyes, watched the regimental commander's back and mimicked his every movement.
  • The hussar at that moment noticed the face of the red-nosed captain and his drawn-in stomach, and mimicked his expression and pose with such exactitude that Nesvitski could not help laughing.
  • The shapely figure of the fair-haired soldier, with his clear blue eyes, stepped forward from the ranks, went up to the commander in chief, and presented arms.
  • Kutuzov asked with a slight frown.
  • The same smile of the eyes with which he had turned from Captain Timokhin again flitted over his face.
  • (The regimental commander's face now that the inspection was happily over beamed with irrepressible delight.)
  • And that other one with him, the Austrian, looked as if he were smeared with chalk--as white as flour!
  • A drummer, their leader, turned round facing the singers, and flourishing his arm, began a long-drawn-out soldiers' song, commencing with the words: "Morning dawned, the sun was rising," and concluding: "On then, brothers, on to glory, led by Father Kamenski."
  • The soldiers, swinging their arms and keeping time spontaneously, marched with long steps.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • But now that Kutuzov had spoken to the gentleman ranker, he addressed him with the cordiality of an old friend.
  • "My dear fellow, how are you?" said he through the singing, making his horse keep pace with the company.
  • "And how do you get on with the officers?" inquired Zherkov.
  • Zherkov touched his horse with the spurs; it pranced excitedly from foot to foot uncertain with which to start, then settled down, galloped past the company, and overtook the carriage, still keeping time to the song.
  • Prince Andrew Bolkonski came into the room with the required papers.
  • "All I can say, General," said he with a pleasant elegance of expression and intonation that obliged one to listen to each deliberately spoken word.
  • It was evident that Kutuzov himself listened with pleasure to his own voice.
  • Kutuzov bowed with the same smile.
  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.
  • "Please have a look at it"--and Kutuzov with an ironical smile about the corners of his mouth read to the Austrian general the following passage, in German, from the Archduke Ferdinand's letter:
  • We have fully concentrated forces of nearly seventy thousand men with which to attack and defeat the enemy should he cross the Lech.
  • "But you know the wise maxim your excellency, advising one to expect the worst," said the Austrian general, evidently wishing to have done with jests and to come to business.
  • He gathered up the papers and with a bow to both, stepped softly over the carpet and went out into the waiting room.
  • He now looked like a man who has time to think of the impression he makes on others, but is occupied with agreeable and interesting work.
  • His face expressed more satisfaction with himself and those around him, his smile and glance were brighter and more attractive.
  • Some, a minority, acknowledged him to be different from themselves and from everyone else, expected great things of him, listened to him, admired, and imitated him, and with them Prince Andrew was natural and pleasant.
  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • "Commander in Chief Kutuzov?" said the newly arrived general speaking quickly with a harsh German accent, looking to both sides and advancing straight toward the inner door.
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • The general with the bandaged head bent forward as though running away from some danger, and, making long, quick strides with his thin legs, went up to Kutuzov.
  • Involuntarily he felt a joyful agitation at the thought of the humiliation of arrogant Austria and that in a week's time he might, perhaps, see and take part in the first Russian encounter with the French since Suvorov met them.
  • In the corridor he met Nesvitski, with whom he shared a room, and the wag Zherkov; they were as usual laughing.
  • There was room enough in the wide corridor for the generals to pass the three officers quite easily, but Zherkov, pushing Nesvitski aside with his arm, said in a breathless voice,
  • He bowed his head and scraped first with one foot and then with the other, awkwardly, like a child at a dancing lesson.
  • General Mack has arrived, quite well, only a little bruised just here, he added, pointing with a beaming smile to his head.
  • Nesvitski with a laugh threw his arms round Prince Andrew, but Bolkonski, turning still paler, pushed him away with an angry look and turned to Zherkov.
  • Nesvitski and Zherkov were so surprised by this outburst that they gazed at Bolkonski silently with wide-open eyes.
  • *(2) Only a hobbledehoy could amuse himself in this way, he added in Russian--but pronouncing the word with a French accent--having noticed that Zherkov could still hear him.
  • Cadet Rostov, ever since he had overtaken the regiment in Poland, had lived with the squadron commander.
  • "Walk him up and down, my dear fellow," he continued, with that gay brotherly cordiality which goodhearted young people show to everyone when they are happy.
  • It was evident that the cadet was liberal with his tips and that it paid to serve him.
  • What a horse he will be! he thought with a smile, and holding up his saber, his spurs jingling, he ran up the steps of the porch.
  • Schon gut Morgen! * he said winking with a merry smile, evidently pleased to greet the young man.
  • "Schon fleissig?" * said Rostov with the same gay brotherly smile which did not leave his eager face.
  • Denisov was a small man with a red face, sparkling black eyes, and black tousled mustache and hair.
  • Puckering up his face though smiling, and showing his short strong teeth, he began with stubby fingers of both hands to ruffle up his thick tangled black hair.
  • (an officer nicknamed "the rat") he said, rubbing his forehead and whole face with both hands.
  • Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
  • "Wetched!" he muttered, throwing down a purse with some gold in it.
  • In the passage Denisov, with a pipe, was squatting on the threshold facing the quartermaster who was reporting to him.
  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
  • Denisov was sitting there scratching with his pen on a sheet of paper.
  • He leaned his elbows on the table with his pen in his hand and, evidently glad of a chance to say quicker in words what he wanted to write, told Rostov the contents of his letter.
  • "Now then, you devil's puppet, look alive and hunt for it!" shouted Denisov, suddenly, turning purple and rushing at the man with a threatening gesture.
  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
  • When Telyanin had finished his lunch he took out of his pocket a double purse and, drawing its rings aside with his small, white, turned-up fingers, drew out a gold imperial, and lifting his eyebrows gave it to the waiter.
  • With shifting eyes but eyebrows still raised, Telyanin handed him the purse.
  • "Well, young man?" he said with a sigh, and from under his lifted brows he glanced into Rostov's eyes.
  • Every muscle of Telyanin's pale, terrified face began to quiver, his eyes still shifted from side to side but with a downward look not rising to Rostov's face, and his sobs were audible.
  • "And I tell you, Rostov, that you must apologize to the colonel!" said a tall, grizzly-haired staff captain, with enormous mustaches and many wrinkles on his large features, to Rostov who was crimson with excitement.
  • Denisov sat gloomily biting his mustache and listening to the conversation, evidently with no wish to take part in it.
  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
  • "Come, that's right, Count!" cried the staff captain, turning round and clapping Rostov on the shoulder with his big hand.
  • Mack has surrendered with his whole army.
  • With hands and feet?
  • Down below, the little town could be seen with its white, red-roofed houses, its cathedral, and its bridge, on both sides of which streamed jostling masses of Russian troops.
  • At the bend of the Danube, vessels, an island, and a castle with a park surrounded by the waters of the confluence of the Enns and the Danube became visible, and the rocky left bank of the Danube covered with pine forests, with a mystic background of green treetops and bluish gorges.
  • Among the field guns on the brow of the hill the general in command of the rearguard stood with a staff officer, scanning the country through his fieldglass.
  • They'll ransack that castle, he remarked with evident approval.
  • He pointed with a smile to a turreted nunnery, and his eyes narrowed and gleamed.
  • The gun rang out with a deafening metallic roar, and a whistling grenade flew above the heads of our troops below the hill and fell far short of the enemy, a little smoke showing the spot where it burst.
  • "What a fine fellow you are, friend!" said the Cossack to a convoy soldier with a wagon, who was pressing onto the infantrymen who were crowded together close to his wheels and his horses.
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • "A million all but one!" replied a waggish soldier in a torn coat, with a wink, and passed on followed by another, an old man.
  • And he also passed on with the wagon.
  • "And then, old fellow, he gives him one in the teeth with the butt end of his gun..." a soldier whose greatcoat was well tucked up said gaily, with a wide swing of his arm.
  • "Yes, the ham was just delicious..." answered another with a loud laugh.
  • It was a German cart with a pair of horses led by a German, and seemed loaded with a whole houseful of effects.
  • A fine brindled cow with a large udder was attached to the cart behind.
  • A woman with an unweaned baby, an old woman, and a healthy German girl with bright red cheeks were sitting on some feather beds.
  • "Sell me the missis," said another soldier, addressing the German, who, angry and frightened, strode energetically along with downcast eyes.
  • When they had gone by, the same stream of soldiers followed, with the same kind of talk, and at last all stopped.
  • With great difficulty he managed to get to his horse, and shouting continually he moved on.
  • Nesvitski looked round and saw, some fifteen paces away but separated by the living mass of moving infantry, Vaska Denisov, red and shaggy, with his cap on the back of his black head and a cloak hanging jauntily over his shoulder.
  • "Tell these devils, these fiends, to let me pass!" shouted Denisov evidently in a fit of rage, his coal-black eyes with their bloodshot whites glittering and rolling as he waved his sheathed saber in a small bare hand as red as his face.
  • What's up with you?
  • "The squadwon can't pass," shouted Vaska Denisov, showing his white teeth fiercely and spurring his black thoroughbred Arab, which twitched its ears as the bayonets touched it, and snorted, spurting white foam from his bit, tramping the planks of the bridge with his hoofs, and apparently ready to jump over the railings had his rider let him.
  • Stop there, you devil with the cart!
  • I'll hack you with my saber! he shouted, actually drawing his saber from its scabbard and flourishing it.
  • The soldiers crowded against one another with terrified faces, and Denisov joined Nesvitski.
  • I'd like to put you on a two days' march with a knapsack!
  • Your fine cords would soon get a bit rubbed, said an infantryman, wiping the mud off his face with his sleeve.
  • Evidently they were firing at the hussars, but the balls with rapid rhythmic whistle flew over the heads of the horsemen and fell somewhere beyond them.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
  • With his shaggy head thrown back like birds when they drink, pressing his spurs mercilessly into the sides of his good horse, Bedouin, and sitting as though falling backwards in the saddle, he galloped to the other flank of the squadron and shouted in a hoarse voice to the men to look to their pistols.
  • His face with its long mustache was serious as always, only his eyes were brighter than usual.
  • And he smiled approvingly, evidently pleased with the cadet.
  • He now came to his former chief with an order from the commander of the rear guard.
  • Zherkov was followed by an officer of the suite who rode up to the colonel of hussars with the same order.
  • "Ah, that's always the way!" said Nesvitski with a wave of the hand.
  • His hand trembled as he gave his horse into an orderly's charge, and he felt the blood rush to his heart with a thud.
  • "At boss zides, Captain," he heard the voice of the colonel, who, having ridden ahead, had pulled up his horse near the bridge, with a triumphant, cheerful face.
  • These were the questions each man of the troops on the high ground above the bridge involuntarily asked himself with a sinking heart--watching the bridge and the hussars in the bright evening light and the blue tunics advancing from the other side with their bayonets and guns.
  • On the French side, amid the groups with cannon, a cloud of smoke appeared, then a second and a third almost simultaneously, and at the moment when the first report was heard a fourth was seen.
  • Rostov, absorbed by his relations with Bogdanich, had paused on the bridge not knowing what to do.
  • He stood looking about him, when suddenly he heard a rattle on the bridge as if nuts were being spilt, and the hussar nearest to him fell against the rails with a groan.
  • Rostov ran up to him with the others.
  • With what soft glitter the waters of the distant Danube shone.
  • There--they are shouting again, and again are all running back somewhere, and I shall run with them, and it, death, is here above me and around...
  • But this sort of thing is the very devil, with them shooting at you like a target.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • On the twenty-eighth of October Kutuzov with his army crossed to the left bank of the Danube and took up a position for the first time with the river between himself and the main body of the French.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • The Russian officer in charge of the transport lolled back in the front cart, shouting and scolding a soldier with coarse abuse.
  • Some of them were talking (he heard Russian words), others were eating bread; the more severely wounded looked silently, with the languid interest of sick children, at the envoy hurrying past them.
  • Only his eyes gleamed feverishly and his thoughts followed one another with extraordinary clearness and rapidity.
  • Five minutes later he returned and bowing with particular courtesy ushered Prince Andrew before him along a corridor to the cabinet where the Minister of War was at work.
  • A wax candle stood at each side of the minister's bent bald head with its gray temples.
  • He took the dispatch which was addressed to him and began to read it with a mournful expression.
  • Prince Andrew stayed at Brunn with Bilibin, a Russian acquaintance of his in the diplomatic service.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • They had known each other previously in Petersburg, but had become more intimate when Prince Andrew was in Vienna with Kutuzov.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • His conversation was always sprinkled with wittily original, finished phrases of general interest.
  • His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • You with all your forces fall on the unfortunate Mortier and his one division, and even then Mortier slips through your fingers!
  • Because not everything happens as one expects or with the smoothness of a parade.
  • Even I, a poor secretary of the Russian Embassy, do not feel any need in token of my joy to give my Franz a thaler, or let him go with his Liebchen to the Prater...
  • You abandon Vienna, give up its defense--as much as to say: 'Heaven is with us, but heaven help you and your capital!'
  • Prince Andrew suddenly exclaimed, clenching his small hand and striking the table with it, "and what luck the man has!"
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • With Prince Hippolyte Kuragin, who was a secretary to the embassy, Bolkonski was already acquainted.
  • "The Berlin cabinet cannot express a feeling of alliance," began Hippolyte gazing round with importance at the others, "without expressing... as in its last note... you understand...
  • "Demosthenes, I know thee by the pebble thou secretest in thy golden mouth!" said Bilibin, and the mop of hair on his head moved with satisfaction.
  • I want to entertain him as far as I can, with all the pleasures of life here.
  • Franz, Bilibin's man, was dragging a portmanteau with some difficulty out of the front door.
  • Before returning to Bilibin's Prince Andrew had gone to a bookshop to provide himself with some books for the campaign, and had spent some time in the shop.
  • "Oh, your excellency!" said Franz, with difficulty rolling the portmanteau into the vehicle, "we are to move on still farther.
  • And off they go and take the bridge, cross it, and now with their whole army are on this side of the Danube, marching on us, you, and your lines of communication.
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • He lets them enter the tête-de-pont. * They spin him a thousand gasconades, saying that the war is over, that the Emperor Francis is arranging a meeting with Bonaparte, that they desire to see Prince Auersperg, and so on.
  • Murat, seeing that all is lost if the sergeant is allowed to speak, turns to Auersperg with feigned astonishment (he is a true Gascon) and says: 'I don't recognize the world-famous Austrian discipline, if you allow a subordinate to address you like that!'
  • His hitherto puckered brow became smooth as a sign of pleasure, and with a slight smile he began to examine his nails.
  • You are faced by one of two things," and the skin over his left temple puckered, "either you will not reach your regiment before peace is concluded, or you will share defeat and disgrace with Kutuzov's whole army."
  • Near Hetzelsdorf Prince Andrew struck the high road along which the Russian army was moving with great haste and in the greatest disorder.
  • The road was so obstructed with carts that it was impossible to get by in a carriage.
  • Whips cracked, hoofs slipped, traces broke, and lungs were strained with shouting.
  • Turn back with your slut!
  • "And who are you?" cried the officer, turning on him with tipsy rage, "who are you?
  • Before the officer finished his sentence Prince Andrew, his face distorted with fury, rode up to him and raised his riding whip.
  • But what's the matter with you?
  • He had just remembered his recent encounter with the doctor's wife and the convoy officer.
  • Passing by Kutuzov's carriage and the exhausted saddle horses of his suite, with their Cossacks who were talking loudly together, Prince Andrew entered the passage.
  • Kutuzov himself, he was told, was in the house with Prince Bagration and Weyrother.
  • The clerk, with cuffs turned up, was hastily writing at a tub turned bottom upwards.
  • He turned to Kozlovski with urgent questions.
  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.
  • Prince Andrew stood right in front of Kutuzov but the expression of the commander in chief's one sound eye showed him to be so preoccupied with thoughts and anxieties as to be oblivious of his presence.
  • Bagration, a gaunt middle-aged man of medium height with a firm, impassive face of Oriental type, came out after the commander-in-chief.
  • Kutuzov went out into the porch with Bagration.
  • My blessing, and may Christ be with you in your great endeavor!
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • Christ be with you!
  • "Get in with me," said he to Bolkonski.
  • Allow me to remain with Prince Bagration's detachment.
  • The spy reported that the French, after crossing the bridge at Vienna, were advancing in immense force upon Kutuzov's line of communication with the troops that were arriving from Russia.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • But to forestall the French with his whole army was impossible.
  • Bagration was to make this march without resting, and to halt facing Vienna with Znaim to his rear, and if he succeeded in forestalling the French he was to delay them as long as possible.
  • Kutuzov himself with all his transport took the road to Znaim.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • Kutuzov with his transport had still to march for some days before he could reach Znaim.
  • To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
  • As soon as Bonaparte (who was at Schonbrunn, sixteen miles from Hollabrunn) received Murat's dispatch with the proposal of a truce and a capitulation, he detected a ruse and wrote the following letter to Murat:
  • Bonaparte's adjutant rode full gallop with this menacing letter to Murat.
  • Bonaparte himself, not trusting to his generals, moved with all the Guards to the field of battle, afraid of letting a ready victim escape, and Bagration's four thousand men merrily lighted campfires, dried and warmed themselves, cooked their porridge for the first time for three days, and not one of them knew or imagined what was in store for him.
  • "If he is one of the ordinary little staff dandies sent to earn a medal he can get his reward just as well in the rearguard, but if he wishes to stay with me, let him... he'll be of use here if he's a brave officer," thought Bagration.
  • The officer on duty was a handsome, elegantly dressed man with a diamond ring on his forefinger.
  • On all sides they saw rain-soaked officers with dejected faces who seemed to be seeking something, and soldiers dragging doors, benches, and fencing from the village.
  • Several officers, with flushed and weary faces, were sitting at the table eating and drinking.
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • Soldiers scattered over the whole place were dragging logs and brushwood and were building shelters with merry chatter and laughter; around the fires sat others, dressed and undressed, drying their shirts and leg bands or mending boots or overcoats and crowding round the boilers and porridge cookers.
  • The soldiers lifted the canteen lids to their lips with reverential faces, emptied them, rolling the vodka in their mouths, and walked away from the sergeant major with brightened expressions, licking their lips and wiping them on the sleeves of their greatcoats.
  • After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers--fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs--near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Our front line and that of the enemy were far apart on the right and left flanks, but in the center where the men with a flag of truce had passed that morning, the lines were so near together that the men could see one another's faces and speak to one another.
  • It's all the Frenchy can do to keep up with him.
  • Dolokhov had come from the left flank where their regiment was stationed, with his captain.
  • To the left from that village, amid the smoke, was something resembling a battery, but it was impossible to see it clearly with the naked eye.
  • Of course you artillery men are very wise, because you can take everything along with you--vodka and snacks.
  • He recognized the agreeable, philosophizing voice with pleasure.
  • Mounting his horse again Prince Andrew lingered with the battery, looking at the puff from the gun that had sent the ball.
  • Lemarrois had just arrived at a gallop with Bonaparte's stern letter, and Murat, humiliated and anxious to expiate his fault, had at once moved his forces to attack the center and outflank both the Russian wings, hoping before evening and before the arrival of the Emperor to crush the contemptible detachment that stood before him.
  • Here it is! was seen even on Prince Bagration's hard brown face with its half-closed, dull, sleepy eyes.
  • Prince Andrew gazed with anxious curiosity at that impassive face and wished he could tell what, if anything, this man was thinking and feeling at that moment.
  • Prince Andrew, out of breath with his rapid ride, spoke quickly.
  • Prince Andrew followed with the suite.
  • "Oh, leave off!" said the accountant with a beaming but rather cunning smile, as if flattered at being made the subject of Zherkov's joke, and purposely trying to appear stupider than he really was.
  • "What's that that has fallen?" asked the accountant with a naive smile.
  • "So that's what they hit with?" asked the accountant.
  • He seemed to swell with satisfaction.
  • The accountant stopped, facing the Cossack, and examined him with attentive curiosity.
  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?"
  • He reined in his horse with the care of a skillful rider and, slightly bending over, disengaged his saber which had caught in his cloak.
  • A huge, broad-shouldered gunner, Number One, holding a mop, his legs far apart, sprang to the wheel; while Number Two with a trembling hand placed a charge in the cannon's mouth.
  • The short, round- shouldered Captain Tushin, stumbling over the tail of the gun carriage, moved forward and, not noticing the general, looked out shading his eyes with his small hand.
  • Prince Bagration turned to the officer and with his dull eyes looked at him in silence.
  • He rode off at a walk to the right and sent an adjutant to the dragoons with orders to attack the French.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • Officers who approached him with disturbed countenances became calm; soldiers and officers greeted him gaily, grew more cheerful in his presence, and were evidently anxious to display their courage before him.
  • One with a bleeding head and no cap was being dragged along by two soldiers who supported him under the arms.
  • The whole air reeked with smoke.
  • The excited faces of the soldiers were blackened with it.
  • The commander of the regiment, a thin, feeble-looking old man with a pleasant smile--his eyelids drooping more than half over his old eyes, giving him a mild expression, rode up to Bagration and welcomed him as a host welcomes an honored guest.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • A fat major skirted a bush, puffing and falling out of step; a soldier who had fallen behind, his face showing alarm at his defection, ran at a trot, panting to catch up with his company.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • Another, without looking round, as though fearing to relax, shouted with his mouth wide open and passed on.
  • The head of the French column, with its officers leading, appeared from below the hill.
  • (He distinctly saw an old French officer who, with gaitered legs and turned-out toes, climbed the hill with difficulty.)
  • Bagration had sent Zherkov to the general commanding that left flank with orders to retreat immediately.
  • The two commanders were much exasperated with one another and, long after the action had begun on the right flank and the French were already advancing, were engaged in discussion with the sole object of offending one another.
  • The general in command of the infantry went toward his horse with jerky steps, and having mounted drew himself up very straight and tall and rode to the Pavlograd commander.
  • The commanders met with polite bows but with secret malevolence in their hearts.
  • It was no longer possible for the hussars to retreat with the infantry.
  • "Fo'ward, with God, lads!" rang out Denisov's voice.
  • In front came a man wearing a strange shako and a blue cloak, swarthy, sunburned, and with a hooked nose.
  • The foremost Frenchman, the one with the hooked nose, was already so close that the expression of his face could be seen.
  • He seized his pistol and, instead of firing it, flung it at the Frenchman and ran with all his might toward the bushes.
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • Rapidly leaping the furrows, he fled across the field with the impetuosity he used to show at catchplay, now and then turning his good-natured, pale, young face to look back.
  • He mustered his last remaining strength, took hold of his left hand with his right, and reached the bushes.
  • One soldier, in his fear, uttered the senseless cry, "Cut off!" that is so terrible in battle, and that word infected the whole crowd with a feeling of panic.
  • Timokhin, armed only with a sword, had rushed at the enemy with such a desperate cry and such mad, drunken determination that, taken by surprise, the French had thrown down their muskets and run.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • He imagined himself as an enormously tall, powerful man who was throwing cannon balls at the French with both hands.
  • A moment later, an adjutant arrived with the same order.
  • The first thing he saw on riding up to the space where Tushin's guns were stationed was an unharnessed horse with a broken leg, that lay screaming piteously beside the harnessed horses.
  • Together with Tushin, stepping across the bodies and under a terrible fire from the French, he attended to the removal of the guns.
  • The wind had fallen and black clouds, merging with the powder smoke, hung low over the field of battle on the horizon.
  • At the foot of the hill, a pale hussar cadet, supporting one hand with the other, came up to Tushin and asked for a seat.
  • With one hand he supported the other; he was pale and his jaw trembled, shivering feverishly.
  • The cloak they spread under him was wet with blood which stained his breeches and arm.
  • "It was the officer, your honor, stained it," answered the artilleryman, wiping away the blood with his coat sleeve, as if apologizing for the state of his gun.
  • In the darkness, it seemed as though a gloomy unseen river was flowing always in one direction, humming with whispers and talk and the sound of hoofs and wheels.
  • The gloom that enveloped the army was filled with their groans, which seemed to melt into one with the darkness of the night.
  • Tushin's large, kind, intelligent eyes were fixed with sympathy and commiseration on Rostov, who saw that Tushin with his whole heart wished to help him but could not.
  • With the soldier, an infantry officer with a bandaged cheek came up to the bonfire, and addressing Tushin asked him to have the guns moved a trifle to let a wagon go past.
  • With the soldier, an infantry officer with a bandaged cheek came up to the bonfire, and addressing Tushin asked him to have the guns moved a trifle to let a wagon go past.
  • Then a thin, pale soldier, his neck bandaged with a bloodstained leg band, came up and in angry tones asked the artillerymen for water.
  • Thanks for the fire--we'll return it with interest, said he, carrying away into the darkness a glowing stick.
  • And they disappeared into the darkness with their load.
  • When I saw, your excellency, that their first battalion was disorganized, I stopped in the road and thought: 'I'll let them come on and will meet them with the fire of the whole battalion'--and that's what I did.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • "Of course, we only just missed one another," said the staff officer, with a smile to Bolkonski.
  • Prince Andrew broke the silence with his abrupt voice, you were pleased to send me to Captain Tushin's battery.
  • Prince Bagration and Tushin looked with equal intentness at Bolkonski, who spoke with suppressed agitation.
  • Prince Andrew went out with him.
  • Irresistible drowsiness overpowered him, red rings danced before his eyes, and the impression of those voices and faces and a sense of loneliness merged with the physical pain.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • The angry eldest princess, with the long waist and hair plastered down like a doll's, had come into Pierre's room after the funeral.
  • The younger sisters also became affectionate to him, especially the youngest, the pretty one with the mole, who often made him feel confused by her smiles and her own confusion when meeting him.
  • His whole time was taken up with dinners and balls and was spent chiefly at Prince Vasili's house in the company of the stout princess, his wife, and his beautiful daughter Helene.
  • In the beginning of the winter of 1805-6 Pierre received one of Anna Pavlovna's usual pink notes with an invitation to which was added: "You will find the beautiful Helene here, whom it is always delightful to see."
  • Anna Pavlovna arranged the different groups in her drawing room with her habitual skill.
  • With her the least worldly of men would occupy a most brilliant position in society.
  • Pierre, in reply, sincerely agreed with her as to Helene's perfection of manner.
  • She looked at her niece, as if inquiring what she was to do with these people.
  • Helene smiled, with a look implying that she did not admit the possibility of anyone seeing her without being enchanted.
  • The aunt coughed, swallowed, and said in French that she was very pleased to see Helene, then she turned to Pierre with the same words of welcome and the same look.
  • In the middle of a dull and halting conversation, Helene turned to Pierre with the beautiful bright smile that she gave to everyone.
  • Helene stooped forward to make room, and looked round with a smile.
  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.
  • And Pierre, anxiously trying to remember whether he had done anything reprehensible, looked round with a blush.
  • Don't be angry with me for exercising an old woman's privilege.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • "Youth, frivolity... well, God be with him," thought he, relishing his own goodness of heart, "but it must be brought to a head.
  • And though Prince Vasili, when he stayed in (as he said) for Pierre's sake, hardly exchanged a couple of words with him, Pierre felt unable to disappoint him.
  • She always addressed him with a radiantly confiding smile meant for him alone, in which there was something more significant than in the general smile that usually brightened her face.
  • He wished to take a decision, but felt with dismay that in this matter he lacked that strength of will which he had known in himself and really possessed.
  • The wax candles burned brightly, the silver and crystal gleamed, so did the ladies' toilets and the gold and silver of the men's epaulets; servants in scarlet liveries moved round the table, the clatter of plates, knives, and glasses mingled with the animated hum of several conversations.
  • This rescript began with the words: "Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides reports reach me," etc.
  • Only Pierre and Helene sat silently side by side almost at the bottom of the table, a suppressed smile brightening both their faces, a smile that had nothing to do with Sergey Kuzmich--a smile of bashfulness at their own feelings.
  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
  • I traveled from Moscow with Prince Vasili.
  • Then I played cards with her and picked up her reticule and drove out with her.
  • "Yes, from Olmutz," he answered, with a sigh.
  • After supper Pierre with his partner followed the others into the drawing room.
  • He pictured the vanity of his diplomatic career in comparison with Pierre's happiness.
  • While the guests were taking their leave Pierre remained for a long time alone with Helene in the little drawing room where they were sitting.
  • He had often before, during the last six weeks, remained alone with her, but had never spoken to her of love.
  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.
  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.
  • Helene answered with a smile that she too had missed it.
  • The princess went up to the door, passed by it with a dignified and indifferent air, and glanced into the little drawing room.
  • Shaking himself, he rose, threw back his head, and with resolute steps went past the ladies into the little drawing room.
  • With quick steps he went joyfully up to Pierre.
  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • However, at nine o'clock the prince, in his velvet coat with a sable collar and cap, went out for his usual walk.
  • She thought: "If I seem not to notice he will think that I do not sympathize with him; if I seem sad and out of spirits myself, he will say (as he has done before) that I'm in the dumps."
  • "She is not very well," answered Mademoiselle Bourienne with a bright smile, "so she won't come down.
  • When the little princess had grown accustomed to life at Bald Hills, she took a special fancy to Mademoiselle Bourienne, spent whole days with her, asked her to sleep in her room, and often talked with her about the old prince and criticized him.
  • "So we are to have visitors, mon prince?" remarked Mademoiselle Bourienne, unfolding her white napkin with her rosy fingers.
  • The little princess was sitting at a small table, chattering with Masha, her maid.
  • He left the room and went to the waiting room where Alpatych stood with bowed head.
  • He was met in the avenue by coachmen and footmen, who, with loud shouts, dragged his sleighs up to one of the lodges over the road purposely laden with snow.
  • Anatole, having taken off his overcoat, sat with arms akimbo before a table on a corner of which he smilingly and absent-mindedly fixed his large and handsome eyes.
  • He shaved and scented himself with the care and elegance which had become habitual to him and, his handsome head held high, entered his father's room with the good-humored and victorious air natural to him.
  • Prince Vasili's two valets were busy dressing him, and he looked round with much animation and cheerfully nodded to his son as the latter entered, as if to say: "Yes, that's how I want you to look."
  • Above all, try to be respectful and cautious with the old prince.
  • The mere thought of her father's look filled her with terror.
  • The little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne had already received from Masha, the lady's maid, the necessary report of how handsome the minister's son was, with his rosy cheeks and dark eyebrows, and with what difficulty the father had dragged his legs upstairs while the son had followed him like an eagle, three steps at a time.
  • Katie," she said to the maid, "bring the princess her gray dress, and you'll see, Mademoiselle Bourienne, how I shall arrange it," she added, smiling with a foretaste of artistic pleasure.
  • It is all quite the same to me, answered a voice struggling with tears.
  • She was looking at them with an expression they both knew, an expression thoughtful and sad.
  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.
  • Letting her arms fall helplessly, she sat with downcast eyes and pondered.
  • What could all that matter in comparison with the will of God, without Whose care not a hair of man's head can fall?
  • When she entered with her heavy step, treading on her heels, the gentlemen and Mademoiselle Bourienne rose and the little princess, indicating her to the gentlemen, said: "Voila Marie!"
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • She only felt a soft hand taking hers firmly, and she touched with her lips a white forehead, over which was beautiful light- brown hair smelling of pomade.
  • Anatole stood with his right thumb under a button of his uniform, his chest expanded and his back drawn in, slightly swinging one foot, and, with his head a little bent, looked with beaming face at the princess without speaking and evidently not thinking about her at all.
  • Anatole answered the Frenchwoman very readily and, looking at her with a smile, talked to her about her native land.
  • Prince Vasili had brought his son with the evident intention of proposing, and today or tomorrow he would probably ask for an answer.
  • He entered the drawing room with his usual alert step, glancing rapidly round the company.
  • Anatole kissed the old man, and looked at him with curiosity and perfect composure, waiting for a display of the eccentricities his father had told him to expect.
  • "It was my fault, mon pere," interceded the little princess, with a blush.
  • "Now the fun begins," thought Anatole, sitting down with a smile beside the old prince.
  • Well, come with me now.
  • "But am I not too cold with him?" thought the princess.
  • Of course, she, a handsome young woman without any definite position, without relations or even a country, did not intend to devote her life to serving Prince Bolkonski, to reading aloud to him and being friends with Princess Mary.
  • The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety.
  • Princess Mary felt his look with a painfully joyous emotion.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • How happy I am now, and how happy I may be with such a friend and such a husband!
  • And this someone was he--the devil--and he was also this man with the white forehead, black eyebrows, and red lips.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne walked up and down the conservatory for a long time that evening, vainly expecting someone, now smiling at someone, now working herself up to tears with the imaginary words of her pauvre mere rebuking her for her fall.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • Princess Mary went to the door of the study with special trepidation.
  • "I have had a proposition made me concerning you," he said with an unnatural smile.
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • He will take you with your dowry and take Mademoiselle Bourienne into the bargain.
  • The princess' beautiful eyes with all their former calm radiance were looking with tender affection and pity at Mademoiselle Bourienne's pretty face.
  • "I quite understand," answered Princess Mary, with a sad smile.
  • I don't wish to marry, she answered positively, glancing at Prince Vasili and at her father with her beautiful eyes.
  • My vocation is to be happy with another kind of happiness, the happiness of love and self-sacrifice.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who always knew everything that passed in the house, on hearing of the arrival of the letter went softly into the room and found the count with it in his hand, sobbing and laughing at the same time.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, though her circumstances had improved, was still living with the Rostovs.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
  • It's true that all you women are crybabies, remarked Petya, pacing the room with large, resolute strides.
  • "No, Sonya, but do you remember so that you remember him perfectly, remember everything?" said Natasha, with an expressive gesture, evidently wishing to give her words a very definite meaning.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wondering and inquisitive eyes, and said nothing.
  • "It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
  • "Not more stupid than you, madam," said the nine-year-old Petya, with the air of an old brigadier.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with the letter, came on tiptoe to the countess' door and paused.
  • At first he heard the sound of indifferent voices, then Anna Mikhaylovna's voice alone in a long speech, then a cry, then silence, then both voices together with glad intonations, and then footsteps.
  • "It is done!" she said to the count, pointing triumphantly to the countess, who sat holding in one hand the snuffbox with its portrait and in the other the letter, and pressing them alternately to her lips.
  • When she heard this Sonya blushed so that tears came into her eyes and, unable to bear the looks turned upon her, ran away into the dancing hall, whirled round it at full speed with her dress puffed out like a balloon, and, flushed and smiling, plumped down on the floor.
  • The tutors came, and the nurses, and Dmitri, and several acquaintances, and the countess reread the letter each time with fresh pleasure and each time discovered in it fresh proofs of Nikolenka's virtues.
  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, practical woman that she was, had even managed by favor with army authorities to secure advantageous means of communication for herself and her son.
  • Rostov was particularly in need of money now that the troops, after their active service, were stationed near Olmutz and the camp swarmed with well-provisioned sutlers and Austrian Jews offering all sorts of tempting wares.
  • On receiving Boris' letter he rode with a fellow officer to Olmutz, dined there, drank a bottle of wine, and then set off alone to the Guards' camp to find his old playmate.
  • He had on a shabby cadet jacket, decorated with a soldier's cross, equally shabby cadet's riding breeches lined with worn leather, and an officer's saber with a sword knot.
  • The regiments had entered and left the town with their bands playing, and by the Grand Duke's orders the men had marched all the way in step (a practice on which the Guards prided themselves), the officers on foot and at their proper posts.
  • Boris, during the campaign, had made the acquaintance of many persons who might prove useful to him, and by a letter of recommendation he had brought from Pierre had become acquainted with Prince Andrew Bolkonski, through whom he hoped to obtain a post on the commander-in-chief's staff.
  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.
  • "Eh, is she pretty?" he asked with a wink.
  • Without answering, Rostov shook the soldier's Cross of St. George fastened to the cording of his uniform and, indicating a bandaged arm, glanced at Berg with a smile.
  • Yes, yes! said Boris, with a smile.
  • You know, of course, that His Imperial Highness rode with our regiment all the time, so that we had every comfort and every advantage.
  • He would drink with you.
  • With a pleasant smile Berg related how the Grand Duke had ridden up to him in a violent passion, shouting: "Arnauts!"
  • 'Albanians!' and 'devils!' and 'To Siberia!' said Berg with a sagacious smile.
  • His hearers expected a story of how beside himself and all aflame with excitement, he had flown like a storm at the square, cut his way in, slashed right and left, how his saber had tasted flesh and he had fallen exhausted, and so on.
  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
  • Berg took the opportunity to ask, with great politeness, whether, as was rumored, the allowance of forage money to captains of companies would be doubled.
  • To this Prince Andrew answered with a smile that he could give no opinion on such an important government order, and Berg laughed gaily.
  • "Yes, stories!" repeated Rostov loudly, looking with eyes suddenly grown furious, now at Boris, now at Bolkonski.
  • "Of whom you imagine me to be one?" said Prince Andrew, with a quiet and particularly amiable smile.
  • Au revoir! exclaimed Prince Andrew, and with a bow to them both he went out.
  • The two Emperors, the Russian with his heir the Tsarevich, and the Austrian with the Archduke, inspected the allied army of eighty thousand men.
  • Hurrah!" thundered from all sides, one regiment after another greeting the Tsar with the strains of the march, and then "Hurrah!"... Then the general march, and again "Hurrah!
  • The Tsar addressed the officers also: "I thank you all, gentlemen, I thank you with my whole heart."
  • Rostov too, bending over his saddle, shouted "Hurrah!" with all his might, feeling that he would like to injure himself by that shout, if only to express his rapture fully.
  • Rostov himself, his legs well back and his stomach drawn in and feeling himself one with his horse, rode past the Emperor with a frowning but blissful face "like a vewy devil," as Denisov expressed it.
  • His every word and movement was described with ecstasy.
  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • Another, the red, stout Nesvitski, lay on a bed with his arms under his head, laughing with an officer who had sat down beside him.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • "Very well, then, be so good as to wait," said Prince Andrew to the general, in Russian, speaking with the French intonation he affected when he wished to speak contemptuously, and noticing Boris, Prince Andrew, paying no more heed to the general who ran after him imploring him to hear something more, nodded and turned to him with a cheerful smile.
  • I was fussing about with Germans all day.
  • We went with Weyrother to survey the dispositions.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • Under cover of obtaining help of this kind for another, which from pride he would never accept for himself, he kept in touch with the circle which confers success and which attracted him.
  • He very readily took up Boris' cause and went with him to Dolgorukov.
  • This combination of Austrian precision with Russian valor--what more could be wished for?
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • My brother knows him, he's dined with him--the present Emperor--more than once in Paris, and tells me he never met a more cunning or subtle diplomatist--you know, a combination of French adroitness and Italian play-acting!
  • Again he pressed the hand of the latter with an expression of good-natured, sincere, and animated levity.
  • They followed Prince Dolgorukov out into the corridor and met--coming out of the door of the Emperor's room by which Dolgorukov had entered--a short man in civilian clothes with a clever face and sharply projecting jaw which, without spoiling his face, gave him a peculiar vivacity and shiftiness of expression.
  • This short man nodded to Dolgorukov as to an intimate friend and stared at Prince Andrew with cool intensity, walking straight toward him and evidently expecting him to bow or to step out of his way.
  • Next day, the army began its campaign, and up to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris was unable to see either Prince Andrew or Dolgorukov again and remained for a while with the Ismaylov regiment.
  • Rostov saw the Cossacks and then the first and second squadrons of hussars and infantry battalions and artillery pass by and go forward and then Generals Bagration and Dolgorukov ride past with their adjutants.
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • Let's dwink to dwown our gwief! shouted Denisov, who had settled down by the roadside with a flask and some food.
  • The French dragoon was a young Alsatian who spoke French with a German accent.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • He brought with him into our rearguard all the freshness of atmosphere of the French army, which was so alien to us.
  • All began to run and bustle, and Rostov saw coming up the road behind him several riders with white plumes in their hats.
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.
  • And as if in accord with Rostov's feeling, there was a deathly stillness amid which was heard the Emperor's voice.
  • The Emperor drew level with Rostov and halted.
  • Then all at once he raised his eyebrows, abruptly touched his horse with his left foot, and galloped on.
  • Before he came up with the hussars, several adjutants met him with news of the successful result of the action.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • Rostov saw how the Emperor's rather round shoulders shuddered as if a cold shiver had run down them, how his left foot began convulsively tapping the horse's side with the spur, and how the well-trained horse looked round unconcerned and did not stir.
  • When the officers had emptied and smashed their glasses, Kirsten filled others and, in shirt sleeves and breeches, went glass in hand to the soldiers' bonfires and with his long gray mustache, his white chest showing under his open shirt, he stood in a majestic pose in the light of the campfire, waving his uplifted arm.
  • The hussars crowded round and responded heartily with loud shouts.
  • Late that night, when all had separated, Denisov with his short hand patted his favorite, Rostov, on the shoulder.
  • "As there's no one to fall in love with on campaign, he's fallen in love with the Tsar," he said.
  • He really was in love with the Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms and the hope of future triumph.
  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.
  • At midday he was admitted to the Emperor, and an hour later he rode off with Prince Dolgorukov to the advanced post of the French army.
  • To the joy and pride of the whole army, a personal interview was refused, and instead of the Sovereign, Prince Dolgorukov, the victor at Wischau, was sent with Savary to negotiate with Napoleon if, contrary to expectations, these negotiations were actuated by a real desire for peace.
  • Toward evening Dolgorukov came back, went straight to the Tsar, and remained alone with him for a long time.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • At six in the evening, Kutuzov went to the Emperor's headquarters and after staying but a short time with the Tsar went to see the grand marshal of the court, Count Tolstoy.
  • "Well, how d'you do, my dear fellow?" said Dolgorukov, who was sitting at tea with Bilibin.
  • That's the sort of man he is, and nothing more, replied Dolgorukov, looking round at Bilibin with a smile.
  • "Whatever are you bothering about, gentlemen?" said Bilibin, who, till then, had listened with an amused smile to their conversation and now was evidently ready with a joke.
  • "I wish you good luck and success, gentlemen!" he added and went out after shaking hands with Dolgorukov and Bilibin.
  • Shortly after nine o'clock that evening, Weyrother drove with his plans to Kutuzov's quarters where the council of war was to be held.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • He was bespattered with mud and had a pitiful, weary, and distracted air, though at the same time he was haughty and self-confident.
  • At last Bagration's orderly came with the news that the prince could not attend.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • At the sound of Weyrother's voice, he opened his one eye with an effort.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • Exactly opposite Weyrother, with his glistening wide-open eyes fixed upon him and his mustache twisted upwards, sat the ruddy Miloradovich in a military pose, his elbows turned outwards, his hands on his knees, and his shoulders raised.
  • Next to Weyrother sat Count Langeron who, with a subtle smile that never left his typically southern French face during the whole time of the reading, gazed at his delicate fingers which rapidly twirled by its corners a gold snuffbox on which was a portrait.
  • In the middle of one of the longest sentences, he stopped the rotary motion of the snuffbox, raised his head, and with inimical politeness lurking in the corners of his thin lips interrupted Weyrother, wishing to say something.
  • Langeron lifted his eyes with an expression of perplexity, turned round to Miloradovich as if seeking an explanation, but meeting the latter's impressive but meaningless gaze drooped his eyes sadly and again took to twirling his snuffbox.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • Weyrother met all objections with a firm and contemptuous smile, evidently prepared beforehand to meet all objections be they what they might.
  • "In that case he is inviting his doom by awaiting our attack," said Langeron, with a subtly ironical smile, again glancing round for support to Miloradovich who was near him.
  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.
  • All are struck by the justness of his views, but no one undertakes to carry them out, so he takes a regiment, a division-stipulates that no one is to interfere with his arrangements--leads his division to the decisive point, and gains the victory alone.
  • That same night, Rostov was with a platoon on skirmishing duty in front of Bagration's detachment.
  • An enormous space, with our army's campfires dimly glowing in the fog, could be seen behind him; in front of him was misty darkness.
  • Ah, the hussars with mustaches.
  • Along the Tverskaya Street rode the hussar with mustaches...
  • Rostov, still looking round toward the fires and the shouts, rode with the sergeant to meet some mounted men who were riding along the line.
  • Shall I go with some of my hussars to see? replied Rostov.
  • Only when approaching Bagration did Rostov let his horse gallop again, and with his hand at the salute rode up to the general.
  • "The picket is still on the hill, your excellency, just where it was in the evening," reported Rostov, stooping forward with his hand at the salute and unable to repress the smile of delight induced by his ride and especially by the sound of the bullets.
  • "Tomorrow very likely I may be sent with some message to the Emperor," thought Rostov.
  • Let every man be fully imbued with the thought that we must defeat these hirelings of England, inspired by such hatred of our nation!
  • The officers were hurriedly drinking tea and breakfasting, the soldiers, munching biscuit and beating a tattoo with their feet to warm themselves, gathering round the fires throwing into the flames the remains of sheds, chairs, tables, wheels, tubs, and everything that they did not want or could not carry away with them.
  • And the feeling of energy with which the troops had started began to turn into vexation and anger at the stupid arrangements and at the Germans.
  • The fourth column, with which Kutuzov was, stood on the Pratzen Heights.
  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • When the sun had entirely emerged from the fog, and fields and mist were aglow with dazzling light--as if he had only awaited this to begin the action--he drew the glove from his shapely white hand, made a sign with it to the marshals, and ordered the action to begin.
  • Seeing them he kept thinking, "That may be the very standard with which I shall lead the army."
  • On the right the Guards were entering the misty region with a sound of hoofs and wheels and now and then a gleam of bayonets; to the left beyond the village similar masses of cavalry came up and disappeared in the sea of mist.
  • An Austrian officer in a white uniform with green plumes in his hat galloped up to Kutuzov and asked in the Emperor's name had the fourth column advanced into action.
  • Kutuzov still in the same place, his stout body resting heavily in the saddle with the lassitude of age, sat yawning wearily with closed eyes.
  • The troops were no longer moving, but stood with the butts of their muskets on the ground.
  • When the soldiers of the regiment in front of which Kutuzov was standing began to shout, he rode a little to one side and looked round with a frown.
  • One in a black uniform with white plumes in his hat rode a bobtailed chestnut horse, the other who was in a white uniform rode a black one.
  • Kutuzov, affecting the manners of an old soldier at the front, gave the command "Attention!" and rode up to the Emperors with a salute.
  • He beckoned to one of his white adjutants and asked some question--"Most likely he is asking at what o'clock they started," thought Prince Andrew, watching his old acquaintance with a smile he could not repress as he recalled his reception at Brunn.
  • Among them were grooms leading the Tsar's beautiful relay horses covered with embroidered cloths.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • But Kutuzov, with respectfully bowed head, seemed also to be waiting.
  • "God be with you, general!" said the Emperor.
  • The Emperor turned with a smile to one of his followers and made a remark to him, pointing to the gallant Apsherons.
  • Bolkonski only tried not to lose touch with it, and looked around bewildered and unable to grasp what was happening in front of him.
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • A fresh wave of the flying mob caught him and bore him back with it.
  • Having by a great effort got away to the left from that flood of men, Kutuzov, with his suite diminished by more than half, rode toward a sound of artillery fire near by.
  • Higher up stood some Russian infantry, neither moving forward to protect the battery nor backward with the fleeing crowd.
  • "Here it is!" thought he, seizing the staff of the standard and hearing with pleasure the whistle of bullets evidently aimed at him.
  • "Hurrah!" shouted Prince Andrew, and, scarcely able to hold up the heavy standard, he ran forward with full confidence that the whole battalion would follow him.
  • Prince Andrew again seized the standard and, dragging it by the staff, ran on with the battalion.
  • He now saw clearly the figure of a red-haired gunner with his shako knocked awry, pulling one end of a mop while a French soldier tugged at the other.
  • It seemed to him as though one of the soldiers near him hit him on the head with the full swing of a bludgeon.
  • Above him there was now nothing but the sky--the lofty sky, not clear yet still immeasurably lofty, with gray clouds gliding slowly across it.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • "And if I should meet His Majesty before I meet the commander-in-chief, your excellency?" said Rostov, with his hand to his cap.
  • On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours' sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy.
  • He could also, by the gleam of bayonets visible through the smoke, make out moving masses of infantry and narrow lines of artillery with green caissons.
  • They were our uhlans who with disordered ranks were returning from the attack.
  • Hardly had the Horse Guards passed Rostov before he heard them shout, "Hurrah!" and looking back saw that their foremost ranks were mixed up with some foreign cavalry with red epaulets, probably French.
  • "We drove them back!" said Boris with animation, growing talkative.
  • With a message to His Majesty.
  • I must look for the commander in chief here, and if all is lost it is for me to perish with the rest.
  • The highroad on which he had come out was thronged with caleches, carriages of all sorts, and Russian and Austrian soldiers of all arms, some wounded and some not.
  • "I saw him myself," replied the man with a self-confident smile of derision.
  • The French, who had ceased firing at this field strewn with dead and wounded where there was no one left to fire at, on seeing an adjutant riding over it trained a gun on him and fired several shots.
  • "What would she feel," thought he, "if she saw me here now on this field with the cannon aimed at me?"
  • Some said the report that the Emperor was wounded was correct, others that it was not, and explained the false rumor that had spread by the fact that the Emperor's carriage had really galloped from the field of battle with the pale and terrified Ober-Hofmarschal Count Tolstoy, who had ridden out to the battlefield with others in the Emperor's suite.
  • When he had ridden about two miles and had passed the last of the Russian troops, he saw, near a kitchen garden with a ditch round it, two men on horseback facing the ditch.
  • One with a white plume in his hat seemed familiar to Rostov; the other on a beautiful chestnut horse (which Rostov fancied he had seen before) rode up to the ditch, struck his horse with his spurs, and giving it the rein leaped lightly over.
  • Turning the horse sharply, he again jumped the ditch, and deferentially addressed the horseman with the white plumes, evidently suggesting that he should do the same.
  • The rider, whose figure seemed familiar to Rostov and involuntarily riveted his attention, made a gesture of refusal with his head and hand and by that gesture Rostov instantly recognized his lamented and adored monarch.
  • Better die a thousand times than risk receiving an unkind look or bad opinion from him, Rostov decided; and sorrowfully and with a heart full despair he rode away, continually looking back at the Tsar, who still remained in the same attitude of indecision.
  • Dolokhov--now an officer--wounded in the arm, and on foot, with the regimental commander on horseback and some ten men of his company, represented all that was left of that whole regiment.
  • A cannon ball killed someone behind them, another fell in front and splashed Dolokhov with blood.
  • "Turn this way!" he shouted, jumping over the ice which creaked under him; "turn this way!" he shouted to those with the gun.
  • On the Pratzen Heights, where he had fallen with the flagstaff in his hand, lay Prince Andrew Bolkonski bleeding profusely and unconsciously uttering a gentle, piteous, and childlike moan.
  • Above him again was the same lofty sky with clouds that had risen and were floating still higher, and between them gleamed blue infinity.
  • "Fine men!" remarked Napoleon, looking at a dead Russian grenadier, who, with his face buried in the ground and a blackened nape, lay on his stomach with an already stiffened arm flung wide.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • He did not regain consciousness till late in the day, when with other wounded and captured Russian officers he was carried to the hospital.
  • "I bestow it with pleasure," said Napoleon.
  • He's very young to come to meddle with us.
  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
  • His face shone with self-satisfaction and pleasure.
  • Prince Andrew did not see how and by whom it was replaced, but the little icon with its thin gold chain suddenly appeared upon his chest outside his uniform.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • And Prince Andrew, with others fatally wounded, was left to the care of the inhabitants of the district.
  • Denisov was going home to Voronezh and Rostov persuaded him to travel with him as far as Moscow and to stay with him there.
  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
  • At last the sleigh bore to the right, drew up at an entrance, and Rostov saw overhead the old familiar cornice with a bit of plaster broken off, the porch, and the post by the side of the pavement.
  • Is everyone all right? he thought, stopping for a moment with a sinking heart, and then immediately starting to run along the hall and up the warped steps of the familiar staircase.
  • My treasure! and Prokofy, trembling with excitement, rushed toward the drawing-room door, probably in order to announce him, but, changing his mind, came back and stooped to kiss the young man's shoulder.
  • Natasha, after she had pulled him down toward her and covered his face with kisses, holding him tight by the skirt of his coat, sprang away and pranced up and down in one place like a goat and shrieked piercingly.
  • Sonya too, all rosy red, clung to his arm and, radiant with bliss, looked eagerly toward his eyes, waiting for the look for which she longed.
  • "Darling Denisov!" screamed Natasha, beside herself with rapture, springing to him, putting her arms round him, and kissing him.
  • His brother and sisters struggled for the places nearest to him and disputed with one another who should bring him his tea, handkerchief, and pipe.
  • Denisov hid his hairy legs under the blanket, looking with a scared face at his comrade for help.
  • "Or is it yours?" he said, addressing the black-mustached Denisov with servile deference.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • Isn't it? asked Natasha, so seriously and excitedly that it was evident that what she was now saying she had talked of before, with tears.
  • He did not know how to behave with her.
  • He went to balls and into ladies' society with an affectation of doing so against his will.
  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!
  • A light footstep and the clinking of spurs were heard at the door, and the young count, handsome, rosy, with a dark little mustache, evidently rested and made sleeker by his easy life in Moscow, entered the room.
  • "Really, Papa, I believe Prince Bagration worried himself less before the battle of Schon Grabern than you do now," said his son with a smile.
  • And the count turned to the cook, who, with a shrewd and respectful expression, looked observantly and sympathetically at the father and son.
  • "And am I to bring the gypsy girls along with him?" asked Nicholas, laughing.
  • Is his wife with him? he asked.
  • In his person, honor was shown to a simple fighting Russian soldier without connections and intrigues, and to one who was associated by memories of the Italian campaign with the name of Suvorov.
  • All Moscow repeated Prince Dolgorukov's saying: "If you go on modeling and modeling you must get smeared with clay," suggesting consolation for our defeat by the memory of former victories; and the words of Rostopchin, that French soldiers have to be incited to battle by highfalutin words, and Germans by logical arguments to show them that it is more dangerous to run away than to advance, but that Russian soldiers only need to be restrained and held back!
  • On that third of March, all the rooms in the English Club were filled with a hum of conversation, like the hum of bees swarming in springtime.
  • Powdered footmen, in livery with buckled shoes and smart stockings, stood at every door anxiously noting visitors' every movement in order to offer their services.
  • Most of those present were elderly, respected men with broad, self-confident faces, fat fingers, and resolute gestures and voices.
  • Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
  • Young Rostov stood at a window with Dolokhov, whose acquaintance he had lately made and highly valued.
  • Bagration appeared in the doorway of the anteroom without hat or sword, which, in accord with the club custom, he had given up to the hall porter.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • Bekleshev and Theodore Uvarov, who had arrived with him, paused at the doorway to allow him, as the guest of honor, to enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • Count Ilya, again thrusting his way through the crowd, went out of the drawing room and reappeared a minute later with another committeeman, carrying a large silver salver which he presented to Prince Bagration.
  • Someone obligingly took the dish from Bagration (or he would, it seemed, have held it till evening and have gone in to dinner with it) and drew his attention to the verses.
  • Bagration seemed to say, and, fixing his weary eyes on the paper, began to read them with a fixed and serious expression.
  • Nicholas Rostov, with Denisov and his new acquaintance, Dolokhov, sat almost at the middle of the table.
  • He winked at the butler, whispered directions to the footmen, and awaited each expected dish with some anxiety.
  • After the fish, which made a certain sensation, the count exchanged glances with the other committeemen.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he cried, and at the same moment his kindly eyes grew moist with tears of joy and enthusiasm.
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • He remembered the expression Dolokhov's face assumed in his moments of cruelty, as when tying the policeman to the bear and dropping them into the water, or when he challenged a man to a duel without any reason, or shot a post-boy's horse with a pistol.
  • "Well, now to the health of handsome women!" said Dolokhov, and with a serious expression, but with a smile lurking at the corners of his mouth, he turned with his glass to Pierre.
  • Pierre, with downcast eyes, drank out of his glass without looking at Dolokhov or answering him.
  • The footman, who was distributing leaflets with Kutuzov's cantata, laid one before Pierre as one of the principal guests.
  • Pale, with quivering lips, Pierre snatched the copy.
  • Despite Denisov's request that he would take no part in the matter, Rostov agreed to be Dolokhov's second, and after dinner he discussed the arrangements for the duel with Nesvitski, Bezukhov's second.
  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.
  • But go with the firm intention of killing your man as quickly and surely as possible, and then all will be right, as our bear huntsman at Kostroma used to tell me.
  • And that's how it is with me.
  • Pierre had the air of a man preoccupied with considerations which had no connection with the matter in hand.
  • "Only tell me where to go and where to shoot," he said with an unnaturally gentle smile.
  • Dolokhov walked slowly without raising his pistol, looking intently with his bright, sparkling blue eyes into his antagonist's face.
  • He held the pistol in his right hand at arm's length, apparently afraid of shooting himself with it.
  • His left hand he held carefully back, because he wished to support his right hand with it and knew he must not do so.
  • "Please," he uttered with an effort.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • Cover yourself with your pistol! ejaculated Nesvitski.
  • Pierre, with a gentle smile of pity and remorse, his arms and legs helplessly spread out, stood with his broad chest directly facing Dolokhov looked sorrowfully at him.
  • Rostov and Denisov drove away with the wounded Dolokhov.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • But it's not that, my friend- said Dolokhov with a gasping voice.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
  • Such a storm of feelings, thoughts, and memories suddenly arose within him that he could not fall asleep, nor even remain in one place, but had to jump up and pace the room with rapid steps.
  • Her father in jest tried to rouse her jealousy, and she replied with a calm smile that she was not so stupid as to be jealous: 'Let him do what he pleases,' she used to say of me.
  • Often seeing the success she had with young and old men and women Pierre could not understand why he did not love her.
  • And now there's Dolokhov sitting in the snow with a forced smile and perhaps dying, while meeting my remorse with some forced bravado!
  • And is it worth tormenting oneself, when one has only a moment of life in comparison with eternity?
  • Next morning when the valet came into the room with his coffee, Pierre was lying asleep on the ottoman with an open book in his hand.
  • He woke up and looked round for a while with a startled expression, unable to realize where he was.
  • With her imperturbable calm she did not begin to speak in front of the valet.
  • She did not sit down but looked at him with a contemptuous smile, waiting for the valet to go.
  • Helene laughed, "that Dolokhov was my lover," she said in French with her coarse plainness of speech, uttering the word amant as casually as any other word, "and you believed it!
  • Pierre wished to say something, looked at her with eyes whose strange expression she did not understand, and lay down again.
  • "I'll kill you!" he shouted, and seizing the marble top of a table with a strength he had never before felt, he made a step toward her brandishing the slab.
  • He flung down the slab, broke it, and swooping down on her with outstretched hands shouted, "Get out!" in such a terrible voice that the whole house heard it with horror.
  • (The wheel continued to revolve by its own impetus, and Princess Mary long remembered the dying creak of that wheel, which merged in her memory with what followed.)
  • She looked at Princess Mary, then sat thinking for a while with that expression of attention to something within her that is only seen in pregnant women, and suddenly began to cry.
  • "Nothing," answered Princess Mary, looking firmly with her radiant eyes at her sister-in-law.
  • Dearest, I'm afraid this morning's fruschtique *--as Foka the cook calls it--has disagreed with me.
  • What is the matter with you, my darling?
  • Oh, you are very pale! said Princess Mary in alarm, running with her soft, ponderous steps up to her sister-in-law.
  • And the little princess began to cry capriciously like a suffering child and to wring her little hands even with some affectation.
  • The midwife was already on her way to meet her, rubbing her small, plump white hands with an air of calm importance.
  • "Mary Bogdanovna, I think it's beginning!" said Princess Mary looking at the midwife with wide-open eyes of alarm.
  • (In accordance with Lise's and Prince Andrew's wishes they had sent in good time to Moscow for a doctor and were expecting him at any moment.)
  • Some women passing with quiet steps in and out of the bedroom glanced at the princess and turned away.
  • Suddenly her door opened softly and her old nurse, Praskovya Savishna, who hardly ever came to that room as the old prince had forbidden it, appeared on the threshold with a shawl round her head.
  • "I've come to sit with you a bit, Masha," said the nurse, "and here I've brought the prince's wedding candles to light before his saint, my angel," she said with a sigh.
  • The nurse lit the gilt candles before the icons and sat down by the door with her knitting.
  • Nurse Savishna, knitting in hand, was telling in low tones, scarcely hearing or understanding her own words, what she had told hundreds of times before: how the late princess had given birth to Princess Mary in Kishenev with only a Moldavian peasant woman to help instead of a midwife.
  • As she was crossing the anteroom she saw through the window a carriage with lanterns, standing at the entrance.
  • "No it can't be, that would be too extraordinary," and at the very moment she thought this, the face and figure of Prince Andrew, in a fur cloak the deep collar of which covered with snow, appeared on the landing where the footman stood with the candle.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • The little princess lay supported by pillows, with a white cap on her head (the pains had just left her).
  • Strands of her black hair lay round her inflamed and perspiring cheeks, her charming rosy mouth with its downy lip was open and she was smiling joyfully.
  • Her glittering eyes, filled with childlike fear and excitement, rested on him without changing their expression.
  • She looked at him inquiringly and with childlike reproach.
  • His coming had nothing to do with her sufferings or with their relief.
  • A woman came from the bedroom with a frightened face and became confused when she saw Prince Andrew.
  • He covered his face with his hands and remained so for some minutes.
  • The doctor with his shirt sleeves tucked up, without a coat, pale and with a trembling jaw, came out of the room.
  • She was lying dead, in the same position he had seen her in five minutes before and, despite the fixed eyes and the pallor of the cheeks, the same expression was on her charming childlike face with its upper lip covered with tiny black hair.
  • And there in the coffin was the same face, though with closed eyes.
  • The wet nurse supported the coverlet with her chin, while the priest with a goose feather anointed the boy's little red and wrinkled soles and palms.
  • Prince Andrew sat in another room, faint with fear lest the baby should be drowned in the font, and awaited the termination of the ceremony.
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • Dolokhov recovered, and Rostov became very friendly with him during his convalescence.
  • And Fedya, with his noble spirit, loved him and even now never says a word against him.
  • Early in the winter Denisov also came back and stayed with them.
  • She almost quarreled with her brother about him.
  • "There's nothing for me to understand," she cried out with resolute self-will, "he is wicked and heartless.
  • I don't know how to put it... with this one everything is calculated, and I don't like that.
  • Well, I don't know about that, but I am uncomfortable with him.
  • And do you know he has fallen in love with Sonya?
  • Rostov noticed something new in Dolokhov's relations with Sonya, but he did not explain to himself what these new relations were.
  • "They're always in love with someone," he thought of Sonya and Natasha.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • In the autumn of 1806 everybody had again begun talking of the war with Napoleon with even greater warmth than the year before.
  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
  • Nicholas understood that something must have happened between Sonya and Dolokhov before dinner, and with the kindly sensitiveness natural to him was very gentle and wary with them both at dinner.
  • Little as Nicholas had occupied himself with Sonya of late, something seemed to give way within him at this news.
  • What a darling Sonya is! he added with a smile.
  • A minute later Sonya came in with a frightened, guilty, and scared look.
  • And I beg you to consider Dolokhov's offer, he said, articulating his friend's name with difficulty.
  • So said the mothers as they watched their young people executing their newly learned steps, and so said the youths and maidens themselves as they danced till they were ready to drop, and so said the grown-up young men and women who came to these balls with an air of condescension and found them most enjoyable.
  • With scarcely any exceptions they all were, or seemed to be, pretty--so rapturous were their smiles and so sparkling their eyes.
  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.
  • They were both dressed in white muslin with pink ribbons.
  • She was not in love with anyone in particular, but with everyone.
  • Whatever person she happened to look at she was in love with for that moment.
  • Nicholas and Denisov were walking up and down, looking with kindly patronage at the dancers.
  • "Look how many charming young ladies-" He turned with the same request to Denisov who was also a former pupil of his.
  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.
  • Noiselessly, skillfully stepping with his little feet in low shoes, Iogel flew first across the hall with Natasha, who, though shy, went on carefully executing her steps.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • When it came to Natasha's turn to choose a partner, she rose and, tripping rapidly across in her little shoes trimmed with bows, ran timidly to the corner where Denisov sat.
  • She can do anything with me! said Denisov, and he unhooked his saber.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.
  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.
  • I'll just finish dealing, and then Ilyushka will come with his chorus.
  • Rostov recalled at that moment a strange conversation he had once had with Dolokhov.
  • Or are you afraid to play with me?
  • He tried, but failed, to find some joke with which to reply to Dolokhov's words.
  • "I have no money with me," he said.
  • He let the eight hundred remain and laid down a seven of hearts with a torn corner, which he had picked up from the floor.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • With a sinking heart he watched Dolokhov's hands and thought, "Now then, make haste and let me have this card and I'll take my cap and drive home to supper with Denisov, Natasha, and Sonya, and will certainly never touch a card again."
  • With a sinking heart he watched Dolokhov's hands and thought, "Now then, make haste and let me have this card and I'll take my cap and drive home to supper with Denisov, Natasha, and Sonya, and will certainly never touch a card again."
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • Those broad, reddish hands, with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt cuffs, laid down the pack and took up a glass and a pipe that were handed him.
  • "Oh, those Moscow gossips!" said Dolokhov, and he took up the cards with a smile.
  • "Still, don't ruin yourself!" said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
  • Rostov, leaning his head on both hands, sat at the table which was scrawled over with figures, wet with spilled wine, and littered with cards.
  • One tormenting impression did not leave him: that those broad- boned reddish hands with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt sleeves, those hands which he loved and hated, held him in their power.
  • Such a little while ago I came to this table with the thought of winning a hundred rubles to buy that casket for Mamma's name day and then going home.
  • Oh, how Rostov detested at that moment those hands with their short reddish fingers and hairy wrists, which held him in their power....
  • Your cousin is in love with you, I know.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • "My cousin has nothing to do with this and it's not necessary to mention her!" he exclaimed fiercely.
  • Vera was playing chess with Shinshin in the drawing room.
  • The old countess, waiting for the return of her husband and son, sat playing patience with the old gentlewoman who lived in their house.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • "Everything's still the same with them," thought Nicholas, glancing into the drawing room, where he saw Vera and his mother with the old lady.
  • Everything's the same with them.
  • Denisov was looking at her with enraptured eyes.
  • Natasha too, with her quick instinct, had instantly noticed her brother's condition.
  • "Yes, that's me!" she seemed to say, answering the rapt gaze with which Denisov followed her.
  • While that untrained voice, with its incorrect breathing and labored transitions, was sounding, even the connoisseurs said nothing, but only delighted in it and wished to hear it again.
  • "What is this?" thought Nicholas, listening to her with widely opened eyes.
  • "Very much," said Nicholas flushing, and with a stupid careless smile, for which he was long unable to forgive himself, "I have lost a little, I mean a good deal, a great deal--forty three thousand."
  • Nonsense! cried the count, suddenly reddening with an apoplectic flush over neck and nape as old people do.
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • Well, if you are in love, marry him! said the countess, with a laugh of annoyance.
  • No, Mamma, I'm not in love with him, I suppose I'm not in love with him.
  • It's all very well for you, said Natasha, with a responsive smile.
  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
  • "Nataly," he said, moving with rapid steps toward her, "decide my fate.
  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
  • "Countess..." said Denisov, with downcast eyes and a guilty face.
  • He looked at the countess, and seeing her severe face said: "Well, good-by, Countess," and kissing her hand, he left the room with quick resolute strides, without looking at Natasha.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • After his interview with his wife Pierre left for Petersburg.
  • But now, in the solitude of the journey, they seized him with special force.
  • "I have hundreds of rubles I don't know what to do with, and she stands in her tattered cloak looking timidly at me," he thought.
  • And again he twisted the screw with the stripped thread, and again it turned uselessly in the same place.
  • The newcomer was a short, large-boned, yellow-faced, wrinkled old man, with gray bushy eyebrows overhanging bright eyes of an indefinite grayish color.
  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.
  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.
  • His shriveled old hands were folded and on the finger of one of them Pierre noticed a large cast iron ring with a seal representing a death's head.
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
  • Pierre began to feel a sense of uneasiness, and the need, even the inevitability, of entering into conversation with this stranger.
  • The servant brought back his tumbler turned upside down, * with an unfinished bit of nibbled sugar, and asked if anything more would be wanted.
  • All at once the stranger closed the book, putting in a marker, and again, leaning with his arms on the back of the sofa, sat in his former position with his eyes shut.
  • Pierre flushed and, hurriedly putting his legs down from the bed, bent forward toward the old man with a forced and timid smile.
  • "Oh, yes!" said Pierre, with a forced smile.
  • And again, glancing at the stranger's hands, he looked more closely at the ring, with its skull--a masonic sign.
  • "Just as I may suppose you to be deluded," said Pierre, with a faint smile.
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • "I ought to tell you that I do not believe... do not believe in God," said Pierre, regretfully and with an effort, feeling it essential to speak the whole truth.
  • The Mason looked intently at Pierre and smiled as a rich man with millions in hand might smile at a poor fellow who told him that he, poor man, had not the five rubles that would make him happy.
  • Whom hast thou denied? he suddenly asked with exulting austerity and authority in his voice.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • Thou dreamest that thou art wise because thou couldst utter those blasphemous words, he went on, with a somber and scornful smile.
  • And thou art more foolish and unreasonable than a little child, who, playing with the parts of a skillfully made watch, dares to say that, as he does not understand its use, he does not believe in the master who made it.
  • Pierre listened with swelling heart, gazing into the Mason's face with shining eyes, not interrupting or questioning him, but believing with his whole soul what the stranger said.
  • "I do not understand," said Pierre, feeling with dismay doubts reawakening.
  • The Mason smiled with his gentle fatherly smile.
  • Look then at thy inner self with the eyes of the spirit, and ask thyself whether thou art content with thyself.
  • And what have you done with all these good gifts?
  • Are you content with yourself and with your life?
  • "Can he really be going away leaving me alone without having told me all, and without promising to help me?" thought Pierre, rising with downcast head; and he began to pace the room, glancing occasionally at the Mason.
  • The traveler, having packed his things with his practiced hands, began fastening his coat.
  • I agree with all you have said.
  • With my whole soul I wish to be what you would have me be, but I have never had help from anyone....
  • "I have come to you with a message and an offer, Count," he said without sitting down.
  • His huge figure, with arms hanging down and with a puckered, though smiling face, moved after Willarski with uncertain, timid steps.
  • The five minutes spent with his eyes bandaged seemed to him an hour.
  • The book was the Gospel, and the white thing with the lamp inside was a human skull with its cavities and teeth.
  • After reading the first words of the Gospel: "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God," Pierre went round the table and saw a large open box filled with something.
  • It was a coffin with bones inside.
  • With bated breath and beating heart he moved toward the Rhetor (by which name the brother who prepared a seeker for entrance into the Brotherhood was known).
  • I... desire regeneration, Pierre uttered with difficulty.
  • "Good!" said the Rhetor quickly, apparently satisfied with this answer.
  • "Now I must disclose to you the chief aim of our Order," he said, "and if this aim coincides with yours, you may enter our Brotherhood with profit.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • This chamber with what you see therein should already have suggested to your heart, if it is sincere, more than words could do.
  • What you have with you: watch, money, rings....
  • To fresh questions as to the firmness of his resolution Pierre replied: "Yes, yes, I agree," and with a beaming, childlike smile, his fat chest uncovered, stepping unevenly and timidly in one slippered and one booted foot, he advanced, while Willarski held a sword to his bare chest.
  • Willarski coughed, he was answered by the masonic knock with mallets, the doors opened before them.
  • During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
  • After that they took his right hand, placed it on something, and told him to hold a pair of compasses to his left breast with the other hand and to repeat after someone who read aloud an oath of fidelity to the laws of the Order.
  • Among them stood a man whose white shirt was stained with blood.
  • On seeing this, Pierre moved forward with his breast toward the swords, meaning them to pierce it.
  • Round a long table covered with black sat some twelve men in garments like those he had already seen.
  • In the President's chair sat a young man he did not know, with a peculiar cross hanging from his neck.
  • Pierre, perplexed, looked round with his shortsighted eyes without obeying, and suddenly doubts arose in his mind.
  • Share thy happiness with thy neighbor, and may envy never dim the purity of that bliss.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • He acknowledged no acquaintances but saw in all these men only brothers, and burned with impatience to set to work with them.
  • The Grand Master rapped with his mallet.
  • Why have you quarreled with Helene, mon cher?
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • But before Prince Vasili had finished his playful speech, Pierre, without looking at him, and with a kind of fury that made him like his father, muttered in a whisper:
  • A week later, Pierre, having taken leave of his new friends, the Masons, and leaving large sums of money with them for alms, went away to his estates.
  • But the story of the duel, confirmed by Pierre's rupture with his wife, was the talk of society.
  • And when after Pierre's departure Helene returned to Petersburg, she was received by all her acquaintances not only cordially, but even with a shade of deference due to her misfortune.
  • In consequence of this discovery his whole manner of life, all his relations with old friends, all his plans for his future, were completely altered.
  • He made friends with and sought the acquaintance of only those above him in position and who could therefore be of use to him.
  • He himself carefully scanned each face, appraising the possibilities of establishing intimacy with each of those present, and the advantages that might accrue.
  • "The doubt is flattering," said "the man of profound intellect," with a subtle smile.
  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.
  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.
  • As soon as he had finished she turned to him with her usual smile.
  • "You know her husband, of course?" said Anna Pavlovna, closing her eyes and indicating Helene with a sorrowful gesture.
  • "It is the sword of Frederick the Great which I..." she began, but Hippolyte interrupted her with the words: "Le Roi de Prusse..." and again, as soon as all turned toward him, excused himself and said no more.
  • A snuffbox with the Emperor's portrait is a reward but not a distinction," said the diplomatist--"a gift, rather."
  • "It is of great importance to me," she said, turning with a smile toward Anna Pavlovna, and Anna Pavlovna, with the same sad smile with which she spoke of her exalted patroness, supported Helene's wish.
  • There were other guests and the countess talked little to him, and only as he kissed her hand on taking leave said unexpectedly and in a whisper, with a strangely unsmiling face: Come to dinner tomorrow... in the evening.
  • He was continually traveling through the three provinces entrusted to him, was pedantic in the fulfillment of his duties, severe to cruel with his subordinates, and went into everything down to the minutest details himself.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • The baby Prince Nicholas lived with his wet nurse and nurse Savishna in the late princess' rooms and Princess Mary spent most of the day in the nursery, taking a mother's place to her little nephew as best she could.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, too, seemed passionately fond of the boy, and Princess Mary often deprived herself to give her friend the pleasure of dandling the little angel--as she called her nephew--and playing with him.
  • Partly because of the depressing memories associated with Bald Hills, partly because Prince Andrew did not always feel equal to bearing with his father's peculiarities, and partly because he needed solitude, Prince Andrew made use of Bogucharovo, began building and spent most of his time there.
  • Not finding the young prince in his study the valet went with the letters to Princess Mary's apartments, but did not find him there.
  • "If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
  • Worn out by sleeplessness and anxiety they threw their burden of sorrow on one another and reproached and disputed with each other.
  • "Petrusha has come with papers from your father," whispered the maid.
  • Karl Ivanich always says that sleep is more important than anything, whispered Princess Mary with a sigh.
  • He took the glass with the drops and again went up to the cot.
  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.
  • He folded it up without reading it and reread his father's letter, ending with the words: "Gallop off to Korchevo and carry out instructions!"
  • The head of the garrison at Glogau, with ten thousand men, asks the King of Prussia what he is to do if he is summoned to surrender....
  • In short, hoping to settle matters by taking up a warlike attitude, it turns out that we have landed ourselves in war, and what is more, in war on our own frontiers, with and for the King of Prussia.
  • The general comes to us, Suvorov- like, in a kibitka, and is received with acclamations of joy and triumph.
  • Get along with you!'
  • The field marshal is angry with the Emperor and he punishes us all, isn't it logical?
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • The inhabitants are totally ruined, the hospitals overflow with sick, and famine is everywhere.
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • He was seized with alarm lest something should have happened to the child while he was reading the letter.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • At last he saw him: the rosy boy had tossed about till he lay across the bed with his head lower than the pillow, and was smacking his lips in his sleep and breathing evenly.
  • He bent over him and, as his sister had taught him, tried with his lips whether the child was still feverish.
  • Prince Andrew touched the head with his hand; even the hair was wet, so profusely had the child perspired.
  • The dark shadow was Princess Mary, who had come up to the cot with noiseless steps, lifted the curtain, and dropped it again behind her.
  • "Yes, this is the one thing left me now," he said with a sigh.
  • He discussed estate affairs every day with his chief steward.
  • He felt that these consultations were detached from real affairs and did not link up with them or make them move.
  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • In another place the women with infants in arms met him to thank him for releasing them from hard work.
  • On all his estates Pierre saw with his own eyes brick buildings erected or in course of erection, all on one plan, for hospitals, schools, and almshouses, which were soon to be opened.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • The house lay behind a newly dug pond filled with water to the brink and with banks still bare of grass.
  • The homestead consisted of a threshing floor, outhouses, stables, a bathhouse, a lodge, and a large brick house with semicircular facade still in course of construction.
  • He quickly entered the small reception room with its still-unplastered wooden walls redolent of pine, and would have gone farther, but Anton ran ahead on tiptoe and knocked at a door.
  • Pierre went with rapid steps to the door and suddenly came face to face with Prince Andrew, who came out frowning and looking old.
  • Pierre said nothing; he looked fixedly at his friend with surprise.
  • As is usually the case with people meeting after a prolonged separation, it was long before their conversation could settle on anything.
  • The preoccupation and despondency which Pierre had noticed in his friend's look was now still more clearly expressed in the smile with which he listened to Pierre, especially when he spoke with joyful animation of the past or the future.
  • It was as if Prince Andrew would have liked to sympathize with what Pierre was saying, but could not.
  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.
  • Prince Andrew spoke with some animation and interest only of the new homestead he was constructing and its buildings, but even here, while on the scaffolding, in the midst of a talk explaining the future arrangements of the house, he interrupted himself:
  • "What does harm to another is wrong," said Pierre, feeling with pleasure that for the first time since his arrival Prince Andrew was roused, had begun to talk, and wanted to express what had brought him to his present state.
  • No, I can't agree with you!
  • No, I shall not agree with you, and you do not really believe what you are saying.
  • Prince Andrew looked silently at Pierre with an ironic smile.
  • "When you see my sister, Princess Mary, you'll get on with her," he said.
  • And he looked at Pierre with a mocking, challenging expression.
  • What evil and error are there in it, if people were dying of disease without help while material assistance could so easily be rendered, and I supplied them with a doctor, a hospital, and an asylum for the aged?
  • I don't understand how one can live with such ideas.
  • Then I don't eat, don't wash... and how is it with you?...
  • I shall never agree with you, said Pierre.
  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • What about? asked Prince Andrew with surprise.
  • Prince Andrew stood leaning on the railing of the raft listening to Pierre, and he gazed with his eyes fixed on the red reflection of the sun gleaming on the blue waters.
  • His meeting with Pierre formed an epoch in Prince Andrew's life.
  • As they approached the house, Prince Andrew with a smile drew Pierre's attention to a commotion going on at the back porch.
  • A woman, bent with age, with a wallet on her back, and a short, long-haired, young man in a black garment had rushed back to the gate on seeing the carriage driving up.
  • In her snug room, with lamps burning before the icon stand, a young lad with a long nose and long hair, wearing a monk's cassock, sat on the sofa beside her, behind a samovar.
  • Near them, in an armchair, sat a thin, shriveled, old woman, with a meek expression on her childlike face.
  • "Andrew, why didn't you warn me?" said the princess, with mild reproach, as she stood before her pilgrims like a hen before her chickens.
  • She looked at him with her beautiful radiant eyes and seemed to say, "I like you very much, but please don't laugh at my people."
  • "Ah, and Ivanushka is here too!" said Prince Andrew, glancing with a smile at the young pilgrim.
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • Ivanushka, sipping out of her saucer, looked with sly womanish eyes from under her brows at the young men.
  • And was Ivanushka with you?
  • "And was the Holy Mother promoted to the rank of general?" said Prince Andrew, with a smile.
  • Before supper, Prince Andrew, coming back to his father's study, found him disputing hotly with his visitor.
  • Perhaps I'll come and sit with you at supper.
  • Make friends with my little fool, Princess Mary, he shouted after Pierre, through the door.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • With the stern old prince and the gentle, timid Princess Mary, though he had scarcely known them, Pierre at once felt like an old friend.
  • Several times parts of the Pavlograd regiment had exchanged shots with the enemy, had taken prisoners, and once had even captured Marshal Oudinot's carriages.
  • It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant.
  • The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles.
  • Rostov lived, as before, with Denisov, and since their furlough they had become more friendly than ever.
  • Denisov evidently tried to expose Rostov to danger as seldom as possible, and after an action greeted his safe return with evident joy.
  • On one of his foraging expeditions, in a deserted and ruined village to which he had come in search of provisions, Rostov found a family consisting of an old Pole and his daughter with an infant in arms.
  • Denisov and Rostov were living in an earth hut, dug out for them by the soldiers and roofed with branches and turf.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • And I saw with my own eyes how Lazarchuk bwought some fwom the fields.
  • Five minutes later, Denisov came into the hut, climbed with muddy boots on the bed, lit his pipe, furiously scattered his things about, took his leaded whip, buckled on his saber, and went out again.
  • In the middle of the game, the officers saw some wagons approaching with fifteen hussars on their skinny horses behind them.
  • A little behind the hussars came Denisov, accompanied by two infantry officers with whom he was talking.
  • The soldiers had biscuits dealt out to them freely, and they even shared them with the other squadrons.
  • From the regimental commander's, Denisov rode straight to the staff with a sincere desire to act on this advice.
  • Who is it that's starving us? shouted Denisov, hitting the table with the fist of his newly bled arm so violently that the table nearly broke down and the tumblers on it jumped about.
  • But at noon the adjutant of the regiment came into Rostov's and Denisov's dugout with a grave and serious face and regretfully showed them a paper addressed to Major Denisov from the regimental commander in which inquiries were made about yesterday's occurrence.
  • On the previous day Platov reconnoitered with two Cossack regiments and two squadrons of hussars.
  • Several bandaged soldiers, with pale swollen faces, were sitting or walking about in the sunshine in the yard.
  • When a new one comes he is done for in a week, said the doctor with evident satisfaction.
  • I am alone in charge of three hospitals with more than four hundred patients!
  • "Is he tall and with reddish hair?" asked the doctor.
  • In the long room, brightly lit up by the sun through the large windows, the sick and wounded lay in two rows with their heads to the walls, and leaving a passage in the middle.
  • Close to the corner, on an overcoat, sat an old, unshaven, gray-bearded soldier as thin as a skeleton, with a stern sallow face and eyes intently fixed on Rostov.
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • The first person Rostov met in the officers' ward was a thin little man with one arm, who was walking about the first room in a nightcap and hospital dressing gown, with a pipe between his teeth.
  • And I've had a bit cut off, you see... he went on with a smile, pointing to the empty sleeve of his dressing gown.
  • Denisov lay asleep on his bed with his head under the blanket, though it was nearly noon.
  • He seemed to try to forget that old life and was only interested in the affair with the commissariat officers.
  • Having returned to the regiment and told the commander the state of Denisov's affairs, Rostov rode to Tilsit with the letter to the Emperor.
  • The general patted him on the shoulder, with a smile.
  • At the time of the meeting at Tilsit he asked the names of those who had come with Napoleon and about the uniforms they wore, and listened attentively to words spoken by important personages.
  • Boris lodged with another adjutant, the Polish Count Zhilinski.
  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • In the army, Bonaparte and the French were still regarded with mingled feelings of anger, contempt, and fear.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • Very glad, very glad to see you, he said, however, coming toward him with a smile.
  • Boris, with one leg crossed over the other and stroking his left hand with the slender fingers of his right, listened to Rostov as a general listens to the report of a subordinate, now looking aside and now gazing straight into Rostov's eyes with the same veiled look.
  • Rostov felt so ill at ease and uncomfortable with Boris that, when the latter looked in after supper, he pretended to be asleep, and early next morning went away, avoiding Boris.
  • And suddenly with a determination he himself did not expect, Rostov felt for the letter in his pocket and went straight to the house.
  • And passing people who looked after him with curiosity, he entered the porch of the Emperor's house.
  • "To hand in a letter, a petition, to His Majesty," said Nicholas, with a tremor in his voice.
  • "Another petitioner," answered the man with the braces.
  • And go along with you... go, and he continued to put on the uniform the valet handed him.
  • Forgetting the danger of being recognized, Rostov went close to the porch, together with some inquisitive civilians, and again, after two years, saw those features he adored: that same face and same look and step, and the same union of majesty and mildness....
  • Stopping beside his horse, with his hand on the saddle, the Emperor turned to the cavalry general and said in a loud voice, evidently wishing to be heard by all:
  • Beside himself with enthusiasm, Rostov ran after him with the crowd.
  • He was riding a very fine thoroughbred gray Arab horse with a crimson gold-embroidered saddlecloth.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.
  • Alexander and Napoleon, with the long train of their suites, approached the right flank of the Preobrazhensk battalion and came straight up to the crowd standing there.
  • The Emperor knit his brows with dissatisfaction and, glancing back, remarked:
  • "Lazarev!" the colonel called, with a frown, and Lazarev, the first soldier in the rank, stepped briskly forward.
  • The Preobrazhensk battalion, breaking rank, mingled with the French Guards and sat down at the tables prepared for them.
  • Two officers with flushed faces, looking cheerful and happy, passed by Rostov.
  • Boris, too, with his friend Zhilinski, came to see the Preobrazhensk banquet.
  • Now he remembered Denisov with his changed expression, his submission, and the whole hospital, with arms and legs torn off and its dirt and disease.
  • The officers, his comrades, like most of the army, were dissatisfied with the peace concluded after the battle of Friedland.
  • If the Emperor pleases to recognize Bonaparte as Emperor and to conclude an alliance with him, it means that that is the right thing to do.
  • Prince Andrew spent half his time at Bald Hills with his father and his son, who was still in the care of nurses.
  • They crossed the ferry where he had talked with Pierre the year before.
  • The birches with their sticky green leaves were motionless, and lilac-colored flowers and the first blades of green grass were pushing up and lifting last year's leaves.
  • "How pleasant it is, your excellency!" he said with a respectful smile.
  • With its huge ungainly limbs sprawling unsymmetrically, and its gnarled hands and fingers, it stood an aged, stern, and scornful monster among the smiling birch trees.
  • Prince Andrew had to see the Marshal of the Nobility for the district in connection with the affairs of the Ryazan estate of which he was trustee.
  • Prince Andrew, depressed and preoccupied with the business about which he had to speak to the Marshal, was driving up the avenue in the grounds of the Rostovs' house at Otradnoe.
  • Ahead of the rest and nearer to him ran a dark- haired, remarkably slim, pretty girl in a yellow chintz dress, with a white handkerchief on her head from under which loose locks of hair escaped.
  • Prince Andrew asked himself with instinctive curiosity.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • Just before the window was a row of pollard trees, looking black on one side and with a silvery light on the other.
  • Beneath the trees grew some kind of lush, wet, bushy vegetation with silver-lit leaves and stems here and there.
  • Farther back beyond the dark trees a roof glittered with dew, to the right was a leafy tree with brilliantly white trunk and branches, and above it shone the moon, nearly at its full, in a pale, almost starless, spring sky.
  • Do wake up, Sonya! she said almost with tears in her voice.
  • "Yes, here in this forest was that oak with which I agreed," thought Prince Andrew.
  • "But where is it?" he again wondered, gazing at the left side of the road, and without recognizing it he looked with admiration at the very oak he sought.
  • Then he would turn away to the portrait of his dead Lise, who with hair curled a la grecque looked tenderly and gaily at him out of the gilt frame.
  • It was the time when the youthful Speranski was at the zenith of his fame and his reforms were being pushed forward with the greatest energy.
  • The Emperor, though he met him twice, did not favor him with a single word.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • Then suddenly the grating sound of a harsh voice was heard from the other side of the door, and the officer--with pale face and trembling lips--came out and passed through the waiting room, clutching his head.
  • Prince Andrew entered a plain tidy room and saw at the table a man of forty with a long waist, a long closely cropped head, deep wrinkles, scowling brows above dull greenish-hazel eyes and an overhanging red nose.
  • The day after his interview with Count Arakcheev, Prince Andrew spent the evening at Count Kochubey's.
  • "What has Speranski to do with the army regulations?" asked Prince Andrew.
  • He rose, took Prince Andrew by the arm, and went to meet a tall, bald, fair man of about forty with a large open forehead and a long face of unusual and peculiar whiteness, who was just entering.
  • The newcomer wore a blue swallow-tail coat with a cross suspended from his neck and a star on his left breast.
  • This was Speranski, Secretary of State, reporter to the Emperor and his companion at Erfurt, where he had more than once met and talked with Napoleon.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • Prince Andrew followed Speranski's every word and movement with particular attention.
  • When Kochubey introduced Prince Andrew, Speranski slowly turned his eyes to Bolkonski with his customary smile and looked at him in silence.
  • He did not like to agree with him in everything and felt a wish to contradict.
  • Though he usually spoke easily and well, he felt a difficulty in expressing himself now while talking with Speranski.
  • "Si vous envisagez la question sous ce point de vue," * he began, pronouncing French with evident difficulty, and speaking even slower than in Russian but quite calmly.
  • "If you will do me the honor of calling on me on Wednesday," he added, "I will, after talking with Magnitski, let you know what may interest you, and shall also have the pleasure of a more detailed chat with you."
  • He sometimes noticed with dissatisfaction that he repeated the same remark on the same day in different circles.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • During their long conversation on Wednesday evening, Speranski more than once remarked: "We regard everything that is above the common level of rooted custom..." or, with a smile: "But we want the wolves to be fed and the sheep to be safe..." or: "They cannot understand this..." and all in a way that seemed to say: "We, you and I, understand what they are and who we are."
  • This first long conversation with Speranski only strengthened in Prince Andrew the feeling he had experienced toward him at their first meeting.
  • Everything seemed so simple and clear in Speranski's exposition that Prince Andrew involuntarily agreed with him about everything.
  • His life meanwhile continued as before, with the same infatuations and dissipations.
  • Pierre began to feel dissatisfied with what he was doing.
  • The Petersburg Freemasons all came to see him, tried to ingratiate themselves with him, and it seemed to them all that he was preparing something for them and concealing it.
  • "Dear Brothers," he began, blushing and stammering, with a written speech in his hand, "it is not sufficient to observe our mysteries in the seclusion of our lodge--we must act--act!
  • The novelty of Truth endowed her with special strength, but now we need much more powerful methods.
  • The majority of the Brothers, seeing in it dangerous designs of Illuminism, * met it with a coldness that surprised Pierre.
  • The Grand Master began answering him, and Pierre began developing his views with more and more warmth.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • I made the sign of the Knights of the East and of Jerusalem, and he responded in the same manner, asking me with a mild smile what I had learned and gained in the Prussian and Scottish lodges.
  • I told him everything as best I could, and told him what I had proposed to our Petersburg lodge, of the bad reception I had encountered, and of my rupture with the Brothers.
  • On this ground Joseph Alexeevich condemned my speech and my whole activity, and in the depth of my soul I agreed with him.
  • I am again living with my wife.
  • But if I forgive her for the sake of doing right, then let union with her have only a spiritual aim.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • In this group Helene, as soon as she had settled in Petersburg with her husband, took a very prominent place.
  • He entered his wife's drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • Pierre went on with his diary, and this is what he wrote in it during that time:
  • I am going to bed with a happy and tranquil mind.
  • A strange feeling agitated me all the time I was alone with him in the dark chamber.
  • It seemed to me that his object in entering the Brotherhood was merely to be intimate and in favor with members of our lodge.
  • Sulphur is of an oily and fiery nature; in combination with salt by its fiery nature it arouses a desire in the latter by means of which it attracts mercury, seizes it, holds it, and in combination produces other bodies.
  • I recollected myself and drove away that thought only when I found myself glowing with anger, but I did not sufficiently repent.
  • My God, I cannot get on with him at all.
  • Suddenly a smallish dog seized my left thigh with its teeth and would not let go.
  • I began to throttle it with my hands.
  • I stepped on it, but it bent and gave way and I began to clamber up a fence which I could scarcely reach with my hands.
  • It seemed as if I chattered incessantly with other people and suddenly remembered that this could not please him, and I wished to come close to him and embrace him.
  • But he looked at me with vexation and jumped up, breaking off his remarks.
  • He lay down on the edge of it and I burned with longing to caress him and lie down too.
  • I had a dream from which I awoke with a throbbing heart.
  • And suddenly I saw him lying like a dead body; then he gradually recovered and went with me into my study carrying a large book of sheets of drawing paper; I said, "I drew that," and he answered by bowing his head.
  • And in my dream I knew that these drawings represented the love adventures of the soul with its beloved.
  • And on its pages I saw a beautiful representation of a maiden in transparent garments and with a transparent body, flying up to the clouds.
  • Among the men who very soon became frequent visitors at the Rostovs' house in Petersburg were Boris, Pierre whom the count had met in the street and dragged home with him, and Berg who spent whole days at the Rostovs' and paid the eldest daughter, Countess Vera, the attentions a young man pays when he intends to propose.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Berg's proposal was at first received with a perplexity that was not flattering to him.
  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.
  • Well, you will be coming," he was going to say, "to dine," but changed his mind and said "to take tea with us," and quickly doubling up his tongue he blew a small round ring of tobacco smoke, perfectly embodying his dream of happiness.
  • A few days before the wedding Berg entered the count's study early one morning and, with a pleasant smile, respectfully asked his future father-in-law to let him know what Vera's dowry would be.
  • Natasha was sixteen and it was the year 1809, the very year to which she had counted on her fingers with Boris after they had kissed four years ago.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • When she heard of his arrival she almost ran into the drawing room, flushed and beaming with a more than cordial smile.
  • Natasha sat down and, without joining in Boris' conversation with the countess, silently and minutely studied her childhood's suitor.
  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.
  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.
  • One night when the old countess, in nightcap and dressing jacket, without her false curls, and with her poor little knob of hair showing under her white cotton cap, knelt sighing and groaning on a rug and bowing to the ground in prayer, her door creaked and Natasha, also in a dressing jacket with slippers on her bare feet and her hair in curlpapers, ran in.
  • This couch was high, with a feather bed and five pillows each smaller than the one below.
  • The countess finished her prayers and came to the bed with a stern face, but seeing, that Natasha's head was covered, she smiled in her kind, weak way.
  • But this is what I'll do, Natasha, I'll have a talk with Boris.
  • Was anybody ever so much in love with you?
  • "You flirt with him too," said the countess, laughing.
  • "Sonya?" she thought, glancing at that curled-up, sleeping little kitten with her enormous plait of hair.
  • She fell in love with Nicholas and does not wish to know anything more.
  • Next day the countess called Boris aside and had a talk with him, after which he ceased coming to the Rostovs'.
  • The grandee's well-known mansion on the English Quay glittered with innumerable lights.
  • Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
  • Carriages kept driving away and fresh ones arriving, with red-liveried footmen and footmen in plumed hats.
  • From the carriages emerged men wearing uniforms, stars, and ribbons, while ladies in satin and ermine cautiously descended the carriage steps which were let down for them with a clatter, and then walked hurriedly and noiselessly over the baize at the entrance.
  • The countess was to wear a claret-colored velvet dress, and the two girls white gauze over pink silk slips, with roses on their bodices and their hair dressed a la grecque.
  • She was still sitting before a looking-glass with a dressing jacket thrown over her slender shoulders.
  • "That's not the way, that's not the way, Sonya!" cried Natasha turning her head and clutching with both hands at her hair which the maid who was dressing it had not time to release.
  • A third with pins in her mouth was running about between the countess and Sonya, and a fourth held the whole of the gossamer garment up high on one uplifted hand.
  • "If you please, Miss! allow me," said the maid, who on her knees was pulling the skirt straight and shifting the pins from one side of her mouth to the other with her tongue.
  • At that moment, with soft steps, the countess came in shyly, in her cap and velvet gown.
  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.
  • The prospect was so splendid that she hardly believed it would come true, so out of keeping was it with the chill darkness and closeness of the carriage.
  • The mirrors on the landing reflected ladies in white, pale-blue, and pink dresses, with diamonds and pearls on their bare necks and arms.
  • The two girls in their white dresses, each with a rose in her black hair, both curtsied in the same way, but the hostess' eye involuntarily rested longer on the slim Natasha.
  • The host also followed Natasha with his eyes and asked the count which was his daughter.
  • That gray-haired man, she said, indicating an old man with a profusion of silver-gray curly hair, who was surrounded by ladies laughing at something he said.
  • "That is Bezukhova's brother, Anatole Kuragin," she said, indicating a handsome officer of the Horse Guards who passed by them with head erect, looking at something over the heads of the ladies.
  • You remember, he stayed a night with us at Otradnoe.
  • And he's hand in glove with Speranski, writing some project or other.
  • The Emperor passed on to the drawing room, the crowd made a rush for the doors, and several persons with excited faces hurried there and back again.
  • Some ladies, with faces betraying complete forgetfulness of all the rules of decorum, pushed forward to the detriment of their toilets.
  • The host followed with Marya Antonovna Naryshkina; then came ambassadors, ministers, and various generals, whom Peronskaya diligently named.
  • She stood with her slender arms hanging down, her scarcely defined bosom rising and falling regularly, and with bated breath and glittering, frightened eyes gazed straight before her, evidently prepared for the height of joy or misery.
  • They must know how I long to dance, how splendidly I dance, and how they would enjoy dancing with me.
  • She and the countess and Sonya were standing by themselves as in the depths of a forest amid that crowd of strangers, with no one interested in them and not wanted by anyone.
  • Prince Andrew with a lady passed by, evidently not recognizing them.
  • At last the Emperor stopped beside his last partner (he had danced with three) and the music ceased.
  • Prince Andrew, as one closely connected with Speranski and participating in the work of the legislative commission, could give reliable information about that sitting, concerning which various rumors were current.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • "Allow me to introduce you to my daughter," said the countess, with heightened color.
  • "I have the pleasure of being already acquainted, if the countess remembers me," said Prince Andrew with a low and courteous bow quite belying Peronskaya's remarks about his rudeness, and approaching Natasha he held out his arm to grasp her waist before he had completed his invitation.
  • Her little feet in their white satin dancing shoes did their work swiftly, lightly, and independently of herself, while her face beamed with ecstatic happiness.
  • And such was Natasha, with her surprise, her delight, her shyness, and even her mistakes in speaking French.
  • With her he behaved with special care and tenderness, sitting beside her and talking of the simplest and most unimportant matters; he admired her shy grace.
  • With her he behaved with special care and tenderness, sitting beside her and talking of the simplest and most unimportant matters; he admired her shy grace.
  • "How can people be dissatisfied with anything?" thought Natasha.
  • Hardly had he got rid of his hat before he ran into Prince Andrew's room with a preoccupied air and at once began talking.
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • The whole company were standing between two windows at a small table laid with hors-d'oeuvres.
  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.
  • Prince Andrew looked at the laughing Speranski with astonishment, regret, and disillusionment.
  • Gervais intervened with a joke, and the talk reverted to its former lively tone.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • He patted the little girl with his white hand and kissed her.
  • Next day Prince Andrew called at a few houses he had not visited before, and among them at the Rostovs' with whom he had renewed acquaintance at the ball.
  • "Why do I strive, why do I toil in this narrow, confined frame, when life, all life with all its joys, is open to me?" said he to himself.
  • Unfortunately she could not grant my request, but I hope, Count, I shall be more fortunate with you, he said with a smile.
  • In their new, clean, and light study with its small busts and pictures and new furniture sat Berg and his wife.
  • Berg, closely buttoned up in his new uniform, sat beside his wife explaining to her that one always could and should be acquainted with people above one, because only then does one get satisfaction from acquaintances.
  • Husband and wife glanced at one another, both smiling with self-satisfaction, and each mentally claiming the honor of this visit.
  • Vera, having decided in her own mind that Pierre ought to be entertained with conversation about the French embassy, at once began accordingly.
  • After Boris came a lady with the colonel, then the general himself, then the Rostovs, and the party became unquestionably exactly like all other evening parties.
  • Everything was just as everybody always has it, especially so the general, who admired the apartment, patted Berg on the shoulder, and with parental authority superintended the setting out of the table for boston.
  • The old people sat with the old, the young with the young, and the hostess at the tea table, on which stood exactly the same kind of cakes in a silver cake basket as the Panins had at their party.
  • Pierre, as one of the principal guests, had to sit down to boston with Count Rostov, the general, and the colonel.
  • "What's the matter with her?" thought Pierre, glancing at her.
  • "What has happened to her?" he asked himself with still greater surprise.
  • Prince Andrew was standing before her, saying something to her with a look of tender solicitude.
  • Pierre changed places several times during the game, sitting now with his back to Natasha and now facing her, but during the whole of the six rubbers he watched her and his friend.
  • Natasha on one side was talking with Sonya and Boris, and Vera with a subtle smile was saying something to Prince Andrew.
  • Vera, having noticed Prince Andrew's attentions to Natasha, decided that at a party, a real evening party, subtle allusions to the tender passion were absolutely necessary and, seizing a moment when Prince Andrew was alone, began a conversation with him about feelings in general and about her sister.
  • With so intellectual a guest as she considered Prince Andrew to be, she felt that she had to employ her diplomatic tact.
  • Vera was saying with an arch smile.
  • This return to the subject of Natalie caused Prince Andrew to knit his brows with discomfort: he was about to rise, but Vera continued with a still more subtle smile:
  • "You are friendly with Boris, aren't you?" asked Vera.
  • "Oh, undoubtedly!" said Prince Andrew, and with sudden and unnatural liveliness he began chaffing Pierre about the need to be very careful with his fifty-year-old Moscow cousins, and in the midst of these jesting remarks he rose, taking Pierre by the arm, and drew him aside.
  • "Well?" asked Pierre, seeing his friend's strange animation with surprise, and noticing the glance he turned on Natasha as he rose.
  • I must have a talk with you, said Prince Andrew.
  • "I... but no, I will talk to you later on," and with a strange light in his eyes and restlessness in his movements, Prince Andrew approached Natasha and sat down beside her.
  • Everyone in the house realized for whose sake Prince Andrew came, and without concealing it he tried to be with Natasha all day.
  • The countess looked with sad and sternly serious eyes at Prince Andrew when he talked to Natasha and timidly started some artificial conversation about trifles as soon as he looked her way.
  • Sonya was afraid to leave Natasha and afraid of being in the way when she was with them.
  • Natasha grew pale, in a panic of expectation, when she remained alone with him for a moment.
  • I am always afraid when I'm with him.
  • It seemed to Natasha that even at the time she first saw Prince Andrew at Otradnoe she had fallen in love with him.
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • Toward midnight, after he had left the countess' apartments, he was sitting upstairs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco smoke, when someone came in.
  • "Ah, it's you!" said Pierre with a preoccupied, dissatisfied air.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • Prince Andrew, with a beaming, ecstatic expression of renewed life on his face, paused in front of Pierre and, not noticing his sad look, smiled at him with the egotism of joy.
  • "With Natasha Rostova, yes?" said he.
  • "Yes, yes," Pierre assented, looking at his friend with a touched and sad expression in his eyes.
  • His father received his son's communication with external composure, but inward wrath.
  • With his son, however, he employed the diplomacy he reserved for important occasions and, adopting a quiet tone, discussed the whole matter.
  • Three weeks after the last evening he had spent with the Rostovs, Prince Andrew returned to Petersburg.
  • Next day after her talk with her mother Natasha expected Bolkonski all day, but he did not come.
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • Before the countess could answer, Prince Andrew entered the room with an agitated and serious face.
  • I had to talk over a very important matter with him.
  • I only got back last night," he said glancing at Natasha; "I want to have a talk with you, Countess," he added after a moment's pause.
  • Natasha glanced with frightened imploring eyes at Prince Andrew and at her mother and went out.
  • She held out her hand to him, and with a mixed feeling of estrangement and tenderness pressed her lips to his forehead as he stooped to kiss her hand.
  • "It is unavoidable," said Prince Andrew with a sigh.
  • Prince Andrew came up to her with downcast eyes.
  • Natasha listened with concentrated attention, trying but failing to take in the meaning of his words.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • He could talk about rural economy with the count, fashions with the countess and Natasha, and about albums and fancywork with Sonya.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • When Prince Andrew spoke (he could tell a story very well), Natasha listened to him with pride; when she spoke she noticed with fear and joy that he gazed attentively and scrutinizingly at her.
  • He was talking to the countess, and Natasha sat down beside a little chess table with Sonya, thereby inviting Prince Andrew to come too.
  • Do you know I have entrusted him with our secret?
  • Flushed and agitated she went about the house all that day, dry-eyed, occupied with most trivial matters as if not understanding what awaited her.
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • What had she to do with the justice or injustice of other people?
  • Before he left he had a long talk with his father about something, and Princess Mary noticed that before his departure they were dissatisfied with one another.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • As it is, not only has she left us, and particularly Prince Andrew, with the purest regrets and memories, but probably she will there receive a place I dare not hope for myself.
  • Then, at the moment of our loss, these thoughts could not occur to me; I should then have dismissed them with horror, but now they are very clear and certain.
  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!
  • He has again become as I used to know him when a child: kind, affectionate, with that heart of gold to which I know no equal.
  • But together with this mental change he has grown physically much weaker.
  • You know me and my relations with Father.
  • Perhaps you will go and live with him too? he added, turning to Princess Mary.
  • And latterly, to her surprise and bewilderment, Princess Mary noticed that her father was really associating more and more with the Frenchwoman.
  • She wrote to Prince Andrew about the reception of his letter, but comforted him with hopes of reconciling their father to the idea.
  • Once, when in a room with a lamp dimly lit before the icon Theodosia was talking of her life, the thought that Theodosia alone had found the true path of life suddenly came to Princess Mary with such force that she resolved to become a pilgrim herself.
  • Rostov had become a bluff, good-natured fellow, whom his Moscow acquaintances would have considered rather bad form, but who was liked and respected by his comrades, subordinates, and superiors, and was well contented with his life.
  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.
  • Petya was a big handsome boy of thirteen, merry, witty, and mischievous, with a voice that was already breaking.
  • She told him about her romance with Prince Andrew and of his visit to Otradnoe and showed him his last letter.
  • I was in love with Boris, with my teacher, and with Denisov, but this is quite different.
  • Nicholas was silent and agreed with her.
  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.
  • "You see he writes," said she, showing her son a letter of Prince Andrew's, with that latent grudge a mother always has in regard to a daughter's future married happiness, "he writes that he won't come before December.
  • (She always ended with these words.)
  • The conversation and the examination of the accounts with Mitenka did not last long.
  • The village elder, a peasant delegate, and the village clerk, who were waiting in the passage, heard with fear and delight first the young count's voice roaring and snapping and rising louder and louder, and then words of abuse, dreadful words, ejaculated one after the other.
  • Then with no less fear and delight they saw how the young count, red in the face and with bloodshot eyes, dragged Mitenka out by the scruff of the neck and applied his foot and knee to his behind with great agility at convenient moments between the words, shouting, Be off!
  • Mitenka's wife and sisters-in-law thrust their heads and frightened faces out of the door of a room where a bright samovar was boiling and where the steward's high bedstead stood with its patchwork quilt.
  • The young count paid no heed to them, but, breathing hard, passed by with resolute strides and went into the house.
  • Next day the old count called his son aside and, with an embarrassed smile, said to him:
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • You say it rests with me.
  • The bare twigs in the garden were hung with transparent drops which fell on the freshly fallen leaves.
  • Milka, a black-spotted, broad-haunched bitch with prominent black eyes, got up on seeing her master, stretched her hind legs, lay down like a hare, and then suddenly jumped up and licked him right on his nose and mustache.
  • Another borzoi, a dog, catching sight of his master from the garden path, arched his back and, rushing headlong toward the porch with lifted tail, began rubbing himself against his legs.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • (This meant that the she-wolf, about whom they both knew, had moved with her cubs to the Otradnoe copse, a small place a mile and a half from the house.)
  • Come to me with Uvarka.
  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.
  • "Daniel, tell them to saddle for us, and Michael must come with my dogs," she added to the huntsman.
  • It seemed to Daniel irksome and improper to be in a room at all, but to have anything to do with a young lady seemed to him impossible.
  • The old count had always kept up an enormous hunting establishment.
  • Nicholas, with a stern and serious air which showed that now was no time for attending to trifles, went past Natasha and Petya who were trying to tell him something.
  • They were taking fifty-four hounds, with six hunt attendants and whippers-in.
  • Besides the family, there were eight borzoi kennelmen and more than forty borzois, so that, with the borzois on the leash belonging to members of the family, there were about a hundred and thirty dogs and twenty horsemen.
  • When they had gone a little less than a mile, five more riders with dogs appeared out of the mist, approaching the Rostovs.
  • In front rode a fresh-looking, handsome old man with a large gray mustache.
  • Take the covert at once, for my Girchik says the Ilagins are at Korniki with their hounds.
  • Natasha sat easily and confidently on her black Arabchik and reined him in without effort with a firm hand.
  • He did not like to combine frivolity with the serious business of hunting.
  • Rostov, having finally settled with "Uncle" where they should set on the hounds, and having shown Natasha where she was to stand--a spot where nothing could possibly run out--went round above the ravine.
  • Karay was a shaggy old dog with a hanging jowl, famous for having tackled a big wolf unaided.
  • Before the hunt, by old custom, the count had drunk a silver cupful of mulled brandy, taken a snack, and washed it down with half a bottle of his favorite Bordeaux.
  • He was somewhat flushed with the wine and the drive.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • This person was a gray-bearded old man in a woman's cloak, with a tall peaked cap on his head.
  • "With young Count Peter, by the Zharov rank grass," answered Simon, smiling.
  • Simon did not finish, for on the still air he had distinctly caught the music of the hunt with only two or three hounds giving tongue.
  • After the cry of the hounds came the deep tones of the wolf call from Daniel's hunting horn; the pack joined the first three hounds and they could be heard in full cry, with that peculiar lift in the note that indicates that they are after a wolf.
  • After listening a few moments in silence, the count and his attendant convinced themselves that the hounds had separated into two packs: the sound of the larger pack, eagerly giving tongue, began to die away in the distance, the other pack rushed by the wood past the count, and it was with this that Daniel's voice was heard calling ulyulyu.
  • The count turned and saw on his right Mitka staring at him with eyes starting out of his head, raising his cap and pointing before him to the other side.
  • The wolf paused, turned its heavy forehead toward the dogs awkwardly, like a man suffering from the quinsy, and, still slightly swaying from side to side, gave a couple of leaps and with a swish of its tail disappeared into the skirt of the wood.
  • At the same instant, with a cry like a wail, first one hound, then another, and then another, sprang helter-skelter from the wood opposite and the whole pack rushed across the field toward the very spot where the wolf had disappeared.
  • The hazel bushes parted behind the hounds and Daniel's chestnut horse appeared, dark with sweat.
  • What sportsmen! and as if scorning to say more to the frightened and shamefaced count, he lashed the heaving flanks of his sweating chestnut gelding with all the anger the count had aroused and flew off after the hounds.
  • Hope alternated with despair.
  • He prayed with that passionate and shamefaced feeling with which men pray at moments of great excitement arising from trivial causes.
  • A thousand times during that half-hour Rostov cast eager and restless glances over the edge of the wood, with the two scraggy oaks rising above the aspen undergrowth and the gully with its water-worn side and "Uncle's" cap just visible above the bush on his right.
  • She was an old animal with a gray back and big reddish belly.
  • Karay finished scratching his hindquarters and, cocking his ears, got up with quivering tail from which tufts of matted hair hung down.
  • The first to come into view was Milka, with her black markings and powerful quarters, gaining upon the wolf.
  • No, it's impossible! thought Nicholas, still shouting with a hoarse voice.
  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.
  • Thanks to the delay caused by this crossing of the wolf's path, the old dog with its felted hair hanging from its thigh was within five paces of it.
  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • She clicked her teeth (Karay no longer had her by the throat), leaped with a movement of her hind legs out of the gully, and having disengaged herself from the dogs, with tail tucked in again, went forward.
  • Karay, his hair bristling, and probably bruised or wounded, climbed with difficulty out of the gully.
  • Nicholas and his attendant, with "Uncle" and his huntsman, were all riding round the wolf, crying "ulyulyu!" shouting and preparing to dismount each moment that the wolf crouched back, and starting forward again every time she shook herself and moved toward the wood where she would be safe.
  • Daniel galloped up silently, holding a naked dagger in his left hand and thrashing the laboring sides of his chestnut horse with his whip as if it were a flail.
  • Daniel rose a little, took a step, and with his whole weight, as if lying down to rest, fell on the wolf, seizing her by the ears.
  • The huntsmen assembled with their booty and their stories, and all came to look at the wolf, which, with her broad-browed head hanging down and the bitten stick between her jaws, gazed with great glassy eyes at this crowd of dogs and men surrounding her.
  • The count remembered the wolf he had let slip and his encounter with Daniel.
  • At midday they put the hounds into a ravine thickly overgrown with young trees.
  • The huntsman standing in the hollow moved and loosed his borzois, and Nicholas saw a queer, short-legged red fox with a fine brush going hard across the field.
  • Now they drew close to the fox which began to dodge between the field in sharper and sharper curves, trailing its brush, when suddenly a strange white borzoi dashed in followed by a black one, and everything was in confusion; the borzois formed a star-shaped figure, scarcely swaying their bodies and with tails turned away from the center of the group.
  • Their horses, bridled and with high saddles, stood near them and there too the dogs were lying.
  • Then from that spot came the sound of a horn, with the signal agreed on in case of a fight.
  • "That's Ilagin's huntsman having a row with our Ivan," said Nicholas' groom.
  • Nicholas dismounted, and with Natasha and Petya, who had ridden up, stopped near the hounds, waiting to see how the matter would end.
  • I gave him one with the fox.
  • Nicholas, though he had never seen Ilagin, with his usual absence of moderation in judgment, hated him cordially from reports of his arbitrariness and violence, and regarded him as his bitterest foe.
  • Ilagin lifted his beaver cap still higher to Natasha and said, with a pleasant smile, that the young countess resembled Diana in her passion for the chase as well as in her beauty, of which he had heard much.
  • To expiate his huntsman's offense, Ilagin pressed the Rostovs to come to an upland of his about a mile away which he usually kept for himself and which, he said, swarmed with hares.
  • Rostov was particularly struck by the beauty of a small, pure-bred, red- spotted bitch on Ilagin's leash, slender but with muscles like steel, a delicate muzzle, and prominent black eyes.
  • "And suppose they outdo my Milka at once!" he thought as he rode with "Uncle" and Ilagin toward the hare.
  • The latter was riding with a sullen expression on his face.
  • Only the delighted "Uncle" dismounted, and cut off a pad, shaking the hare for the blood to drip off, and anxiously glancing round with restless eyes while his arms and legs twitched.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • For a long time they continued to look at red Rugay who, his arched back spattered with mud and clanking the ring of his leash, walked along just behind "Uncle's" horse with the serene air of a conqueror.
  • A huntsman was sent to Otradnoe for a trap, while Nicholas rode with Natasha and Petya to "Uncle's" house.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • Rugay, his back still muddy, came into the room and lay down on the sofa, cleaning himself with his tongue and teeth.
  • Leading from the study was a passage in which a partition with ragged curtains could be seen.
  • And Natasha felt that this costume, the very one she had regarded with surprise and amusement at Otradnoe, was just the right thing and not at all worse than a swallow-tail or frock coat.
  • With hospitable dignity and cordiality in her glance and in every motion, she looked at the visitors and, with a pleasant smile, bowed respectfully.
  • With hospitable dignity and cordiality in her glance and in every motion, she looked at the visitors and, with a pleasant smile, bowed respectfully.
  • She went to the table, set down the tray, and with her plump white hands deftly took from it the bottles and various hors d'oeuvres and dishes and arranged them on the table.
  • When she had finished, she stepped aside and stopped at the door with a smile on her face.
  • On the tray was a bottle of herb wine, different kinds of vodka, pickled mushrooms, rye cakes made with buttermilk, honey in the comb, still mead and sparkling mead, apples, nuts (raw and roasted), and nut-and-honey sweets.
  • Afterwards she brought a freshly roasted chicken, ham, preserves made with honey, and preserves made with sugar.
  • After supper, over their cherry brandy, Rostov and "Uncle" talked of past and future hunts, of Rugay and Ilagin's dogs, while Natasha sat upright on the sofa and listened with sparkling eyes.
  • Really very good! said Nicholas with some unintentional superciliousness, as if ashamed to confess that the sounds pleased him very much.
  • Mitka tuned up afresh, and recommenced thrumming the balalayka to the air of My Lady, with trills and variations.
  • "Uncle" sat listening, slightly smiling, with his head on one side.
  • "You like listening?" she said to Natasha, with a smile extremely like "Uncle's."
  • "He doesn't play that part right!" said "Uncle" suddenly, with an energetic gesture.
  • Anisya Fedorovna, with her light step, willingly went to fulfill her errand and brought back the guitar.
  • Without looking at anyone, "Uncle" blew the dust off it and, tapping the case with his bony fingers, tuned the guitar and settled himself in his armchair.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • The tune, played with precision and in exact time, began to thrill in the hearts of Nicholas and Natasha, arousing in them the same kind of sober mirth as radiated from Anisya Fedorovna's whole being.
  • "Uncle" continued to play correctly, carefully, with energetic firmness, looking with a changed and inspired expression at the spot where Anisya Fedorovna had just stood.
  • Natasha threw off the shawl from her shoulders, ran forward to face "Uncle," and setting her arms akimbo also made a motion with her shoulders and struck an attitude.
  • "Well, little countess; that's it--come on!" cried "Uncle," with a joyous laugh, having finished the dance.
  • "Uncle" wrapped Natasha up warmly and took leave of her with quite a new tenderness.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • Several times the countess, with tears in her eyes, told her son that now both her daughters were settled, her only wish was to see him married.
  • Nicholas did not go to Moscow, and the countess did not renew the conversation with him about marriage.
  • She saw with sorrow, and sometimes with exasperation, symptoms of a growing attachment between her son and the portionless Sonya.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • Nastasya Ivanovna the buffoon sat with a sad face at the window with two old ladies.
  • I want him! said Natasha, with glittering eyes and no sign of a smile.
  • "Sit down with me a little," said the countess.
  • "What can I do with them?" thought Natasha.
  • She seemed to be trying whether any of them would get angry or sulky with her; but the serfs fulfilled no one's orders so readily as they did hers.
  • What am I to do with myself?
  • And tapping with her heels, she ran quickly upstairs to see Vogel and his wife who lived on the upper story.
  • Two governesses were sitting with the Vogels at a table, on which were plates of raisins, walnuts, and almonds.
  • Natasha sat down, listened to their talk with a serious and thoughtful air, and then got up again.
  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.
  • She sat behind the bookcase with her eyes fixed on a streak of light escaping from the pantry door and listened to herself and pondered.
  • Sonya passed to the pantry with a glass in her hand.
  • Natasha glanced at her and at the crack in the pantry door, and it seemed to her that she remembered the light falling through that crack once before and Sonya passing with a glass in her hand.
  • "Oh, you are there!" said Sonya with a start, and came near and listened.
  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.
  • The same faces, the same talk, Papa holding his cup and blowing in the same way! thought Natasha, feeling with horror a sense of repulsion rising up in her for the whole household, because they were always the same.
  • When I was quite little that used to be so with me.
  • So they went through their memories, smiling with pleasure: not the sad memories of old age, but poetic, youthful ones--those impressions of one's most distant past in which dreams and realities blend--and they laughed with quiet enjoyment.
  • Sonya, as always, did not quite keep pace with them, though they shared the same reminiscences.
  • She simply enjoyed their pleasure and tried to fit in with it.
  • Natasha rejoined with conviction.
  • "Yes, but it is hard for us to imagine eternity," remarked Dimmler, who had joined the young folk with a mildly condescending smile but now spoke as quietly and seriously as they.
  • Nicholas did not take his eyes off his sister and drew breath in time with her.
  • Dimmler, who had seated himself beside the countess, listened with closed eyes.
  • The mummers (some of the house serfs) dressed up as bears, Turks, innkeepers, and ladies--frightening and funny--bringing in with them the cold from outside and a feeling of gaiety, crowded, at first timidly, into the anteroom, then hiding behind one another they pushed into the ballroom where, shyly at first and then more and more merrily and heartily, they started singing, dancing, and playing Christmas games.
  • An hussar was Natasha, and a Circassian was Sonya with burnt-cork mustache and eyebrows.
  • Nicholas, who, as the roads were in splendid condition, wanted to take them all for a drive in his troyka, proposed to take with them about a dozen of the serf mummers and drive to "Uncle's."
  • Melyukova was a widow, who, with her family and their tutors and governesses, lived three miles from the Rostovs.
  • I'll dress up at once and go with them.
  • It was decided that the count must not go, but that if Louisa Ivanovna (Madame Schoss) would go with them, the young ladies might go to the Melyukovs', Sonya, generally so timid and shy, more urgently than anyone begging Louisa Ivanovna not to refuse.
  • Louisa Ivanovna consented to go, and in half an hour four troyka sleighs with large and small bells, their runners squeaking and whistling over the frozen snow, drove up to the porch.
  • Two of the troykas were the usual household sleighs, the third was the old count's with a trotter from the Orlov stud as shaft horse, the fourth was Nicholas' own with a short shaggy black shaft horse.
  • The old count's troyka, with Dimmler and his party, started forward, squeaking on its runners as though freezing to the snow, its deep-toned bell clanging.
  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.
  • With screams squeals, and waving of whips that caused even the shaft horses to gallop--the other sleighs followed.
  • Zakhar held back his horses and turned his face, which was already covered with hoarfrost to his eyebrows.
  • Zakhar, while still keeping his arms extended, raised one hand with the reins.
  • They were still surrounded by the magic plain bathed in moonlight and spangled with stars.
  • "Look, his mustache and eyelashes are all white!" said one of the strange, pretty, unfamiliar people--the one with fine eyebrows and mustache.
  • "I think this used to be Natasha," thought Nicholas, "and that was Madame Schoss, but perhaps it's not, and this Circassian with the mustache I don't know, but I love her."
  • But here was a fairy forest with black moving shadows, and a glitter of diamonds and a flight of marble steps and the silver roofs of fairy buildings and the shrill yells of some animals.
  • It really was Melyukovka, and maids and footmen with merry faces came running, out to the porch carrying candles.
  • Natasha, the young Melyukovs' favorite, disappeared with them into the back rooms where a cork and various dressing gowns and male garments were called for and received from the footman by bare girlish arms from behind the door.
  • Pelageya Danilovna, having given orders to clear the rooms for the visitors and arranged about refreshments for the gentry and the serfs, went about among the mummers without removing her spectacles, peering into their faces with a suppressed smile and failing to recognize any of them.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • "Now to tell one's fortune in the empty bathhouse is frightening!" said an old maid who lived with the Melyukovs, during supper.
  • After sitting a while, she suddenly hears someone coming... a sleigh drives up with harness bells; she hears him coming!
  • He comes in, just in the shape of a man, like an officer--comes in and sits down to table with her.
  • "Ah! ah!" screamed Natasha, rolling her eyes with horror.
  • Whether they were playing the ring and string game or the ruble game or talking as now, Nicholas did not leave Sonya's side, and gazed at her with quite new eyes.
  • The light was so strong and the snow sparkled with so many stars that one did not wish to look up at the sky and the real stars were unnoticed.
  • A tree in the garden snapped with the frost, and then all was again perfectly silent.
  • He was in a woman's dress, with tousled hair and a happy smile new to Sonya.
  • When they all drove back from Pelageya Danilovna's, Natasha, who always saw and noticed everything, arranged that she and Madame Schoss should go back in the sleigh with Dimmler, and Sonya with Nicholas and the maids.
  • He looked and recognizing in her both the old and the new Sonya, and being reminded by the smell of burnt cork of the sensation of her kiss, inhaled the frosty air with a full breast and, looking at the ground flying beneath him and at the sparkling sky, felt himself again in fairyland.
  • "Sonya, is it well with thee?" he asked from time to time.
  • "Have you told her?" asked Natasha, suddenly beaming all over with joy.
  • Oh, how strange you are with that mustache and those eyebrows!...
  • I was beginning to be vexed with you.
  • "I see someone with a mustache," said Natasha, seeing her own face.
  • With Sonya's help and the maid's, Natasha got the glass she held into the right position opposite the other; her face assumed a serious expression and she sat silent.
  • "Of course she will!" whispered Natasha, but did not finish... suddenly Sonya pushed away the glass she was holding and covered her eyes with her hand.
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.
  • Sonya listened silently with downcast eyes to the countess' cruel words, without understanding what was required of her.
  • Nicholas felt the situation to be intolerable and went to have an explanation with his mother.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • But he had no time to utter the decisive word which the expression of his face caused his mother to await with terror, and which would perhaps have forever remained a cruel memory to them both.
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • The thought that her best days, which she would have employed in loving him, were being vainly wasted, with no advantage to anyone, tormented her incessantly.
  • So the countess remained in the country, and the count, taking Sonya and Natasha with him, went to Moscow at the end of January.
  • Only the skeleton of life remained: his house, a brilliant wife who now enjoyed the favors of a very important personage, acquaintance with all Petersburg, and his court service with its dull formalities.
  • He ceased keeping a diary, avoided the company of the Brothers, began going to the club again, drank a great deal, and came once more in touch with the bachelor sets, leading such a life that the Countess Helene thought it necessary to speak severely to him about it.
  • When after a bachelor supper he rose with his amiable and kindly smile, yielding to the entreaties of the festive company to drive off somewhere with them, shouts of delight and triumph arose among the young men.
  • Had he not at one time longed with all his heart to establish a republic in Russia; then himself to be a Napoleon; then to be a philosopher; and then a strategist and the conqueror of Napoleon?
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
  • Every sphere of work was connected, in his eyes, with evil and deception.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • She saw the coldness and malevolence with which the old prince received and dismissed the young men, possible suitors, who sometimes appeared at their house.
  • Julie, with whom she had corresponded for the last five years, was in Moscow, but proved to be quite alien to her when they met.
  • On Thursdays Princess Mary remembered with a mournful smile that she now had no one to write to, since Julie--whose presence gave her no pleasure was here and they met every week.
  • Like the old emigre who declined to marry the lady with whom he had spent his evenings for years, she regretted Julie's presence and having no one to write to.
  • The idea that at the first moment of receiving the news of his son's intentions had occurred to him in jest--that if Andrew got married he himself would marry Bourienne--had evidently pleased him, and latterly he had persistently, and as it seemed to Princess Mary merely to offend her, shown special endearments to the companion and expressed his dissatisfaction with his daughter by demonstrations of love of Bourienne.
  • After dinner, when the footman handed coffee and from habit began with the princess, the prince suddenly grew furious, threw his stick at Philip, and instantly gave instructions to have him conscripted for the army.
  • "He is old and feeble, and I dare to condemn him!" she thought at such moments, with a feeling of revulsion against herself.
  • Metivier, who came in the morning with his felicitations, considered it proper in his quality of doctor de forcer la consigne, * as he told Princess Mary, and went in to see the prince.
  • After admitting the doctor, Princess Mary sat down with a book in the drawing room near the door through which she could hear all that passed in the study.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • With her, he said, he could not have a moment's peace and could not die quietly.
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • These guests--the famous Count Rostopchin, Prince Lopukhin with his nephew, General Chatrov an old war comrade of the prince's, and of the younger generation Pierre and Boris Drubetskoy--awaited the prince in the drawing room.
  • The small group that assembled before dinner in the lofty old-fashioned drawing room with its old furniture resembled the solemn gathering of a court of justice.
  • "The Duke of Oldenburg bears his misfortunes with admirable strength of character and resignation," remarked Boris, joining in respectfully.
  • "I have read our protests about the Oldenburg affair and was surprised how badly the Note was worded," remarked Count Rostopchin in the casual tone of a man dealing with a subject quite familiar to him.
  • Pierre looked at Rostopchin with naive astonishment, not understanding why he should be disturbed by the bad composition of the Note.
  • "My dear fellow, with our five hundred thousand troops it should be easy to have a good style," returned Count Rostopchin.
  • Pierre now understood the count's dissatisfaction with the wording of the Note.
  • And he narrated his whole conversation with the French doctor and the reasons that convinced him that Metivier was a spy.
  • The old prince looked at Rostopchin with a smile and wagged his head approvingly.
  • "Well, good-by, your excellency, keep well!" said Rostopchin, getting up with characteristic briskness and holding out his hand to the prince.
  • Why do you ask me that? said Princess Mary, still thinking of that morning's conversation with her father.
  • Because I have noticed that when a young man comes on leave from Petersburg to Moscow it is usually with the object of marrying an heiress.
  • "Yes," returned Pierre with a smile, "and this young man now manages matters so that where there is a wealthy heiress there he is too.
  • And do you know the new way of courting? said Pierre with an amused smile, evidently in that cheerful mood of good humored raillery for which he so often reproached himself in his diary.
  • He is very melancholy with Mademoiselle Karagina, said Pierre.
  • "Oh, my God, Count, there are moments when I would marry anybody!" she cried suddenly to her own surprise and with tears in her voice.
  • I don't know what is the matter with me today.
  • I hope to be friends with her.
  • Princess Mary told Pierre of her plan to become intimate with her future sister-in-law as soon as the Rostovs arrived and to try to accustom the old prince to her.
  • Boris had not succeeded in making a wealthy match in Petersburg, so with the same object in view he came to Moscow.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who often visited the Karagins, while playing cards with the mother made careful inquiries as to Julie's dowry (she was to have two estates in Penza and the Nizhegorod forests).
  • Anna Mikhaylovna regarded the refined sadness that united her son to the wealthy Julie with emotion, and resignation to the Divine will.
  • He drove to the Karagins' with the firm intention of proposing.
  • Her irritability had suddenly quite vanished, and her anxious, imploring eyes were fixed on him with greedy expectation.
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • At the end of January old Count Rostov went to Moscow with Natasha and Sonya.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, with her spectacles hanging down on her nose and her head flung back, stood in the hall doorway looking with a stern, grim face at the new arrivals.
  • I'm heartily glad you have come and are staying with me.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • She's here with her son.
  • He is here too, with his wife.
  • He dined with me on Wednesday.
  • They'll be safe with me, as safe as in Chancery!
  • Tomorrow you'll go with your father to see her.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • She greeted the father and daughter with special politeness and showed them to the princess' room.
  • God is my witness, I did not know you had honored us with a visit, and I came in such a costume only to see my daughter.
  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.
  • When the count returned, Natasha was impolitely pleased and hastened to get away: at that moment she hated the stiff, elderly princess, who could place her in such an embarrassing position and had spent half an hour with her without once mentioning Prince Andrew.
  • When the count was already leaving the room, Princess Mary went up hurriedly to Natasha, took her by the hand, and said with a deep sigh:
  • "I think, Princess, it is not convenient to speak of that now," she said with external dignity and coldness, though she felt the tears choking her.
  • She came in to dinner with red eyes.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, who knew how the prince had received the Rostovs, pretended not to notice how upset Natasha was and jested resolutely and loudly at table with the count and the other guests.
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
  • "And how can Sonya love Nicholas so calmly and quietly and wait so long and so patiently?" thought she, looking at Sonya, who also came in quite ready, with a fan in her hand.
  • The music sounded louder and through the door rows of brightly lit boxes in which ladies sat with bare arms and shoulders, and noisy stalls brilliant with uniforms, glittered before their eyes.
  • Natasha, smoothing her gown, went in with Sonya and sat down, scanning the brilliant tiers of boxes opposite.
  • A sensation she had not experienced for a long time--that of hundreds of eyes looking at her bare arms and neck--suddenly affected her both agreeably and disagreeably and called up a whole crowd of memories, desires and emotions associated with that feeling.
  • She struck those who saw her by her fullness of life and beauty, combined with her indifference to everything about her.
  • "Look, there's Alenina," said Sonya, "with her mother, isn't it?"
  • The Karagins, Julie--and Boris with them.
  • Behind them, wearing a smile and leaning over with an ear to Julie's mouth, was Boris' handsome smoothly brushed head.
  • Behind them sat Anna Mikhaylovna wearing a green headdress and with a happy look of resignation to the will of God on her face.
  • A tall, beautiful woman with a mass of plaited hair and much exposed plump white shoulders and neck, round which she wore a double string of large pearls, entered the adjoining box rustling her heavy silk dress and took a long time settling into her place.
  • I'm here on business and have brought my girls with me.
  • As soon as it rose everyone in the boxes and stalls became silent, and all the men, old and young, in uniform and evening dress, and all the women with gems on their bare flesh, turned their whole attention with eager curiosity to the stage.
  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.
  • He was now in an adjutant's uniform with one epaulet and a shoulder knot.
  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.
  • Then he took his place in the first row of the stalls and sat down beside Dolokhov, nudging with his elbow in a friendly and offhand way that Dolokhov whom others treated so fawningly.
  • Boris came to the Rostovs' box, received their congratulations very simply, and raising his eyebrows with an absent-minded smile conveyed to Natasha and Sonya his fiancee's invitation to her wedding, and went away.
  • During the whole of that entr'acte Kuragin stood with Dolokhov in front of the orchestra partition, looking at the Rostovs' box.
  • While conversing with Pierre, Natasha heard a man's voice in Countess Bezukhova's box and something told her it was Kuragin.
  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • During this act every time Natasha looked toward the stalls she saw Anatole Kuragin with an arm thrown across the back of his chair, staring at her.
  • When the second act was over Countess Bezukhova rose, turned to the Rostovs' box--her whole bosom completely exposed--beckoned the old count with a gloved finger, and paying no attention to those who had entered her box began talking to him with an amiable smile.
  • "Do make me acquainted with your charming daughters," said she.
  • She was so pleased by praise from this brilliant beauty that she blushed with pleasure.
  • I have already heard much of you in Petersburg and wanted to get to know you, said she to Natasha with her stereotyped and lovely smile.
  • The scene of the third act represented a palace in which many candles were burning and pictures of knights with short beards hung on the walls.
  • She sang something mournfully, addressing the queen, but the king waved his arm severely, and men and women with bare legs came in from both sides and began dancing all together.
  • Then the violins played very shrilly and merrily and one of the women with thick bare legs and thin arms, separating from the others, went behind the wings, adjusted her bodice, returned to the middle of the stage, and began jumping and striking one foot rapidly against the other.
  • The cymbals and horns in the orchestra struck up more loudly, and this man with bare legs jumped very high and waved his feet about very rapidly.
  • Everybody in the stalls, boxes, and galleries began clapping and shouting with all their might, and the man stopped and began smiling and bowing to all sides.
  • Then other men and women danced with bare legs.
  • She looked about with pleasure, smiling joyfully.
  • Kuragin was much more sensible and simple with women than among men.
  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?
  • And again she felt with horror that no barrier lay between him and her.
  • He was looking at her with glittering eyes, smiling tenderly.
  • And again in imagination she went over her whole conversation with Kuragin, and again saw the face, gestures, and tender smile of that bold handsome man when he pressed her arm.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.
  • At that time while with his regiment in Poland, a Polish landowner of small means had forced him to marry his daughter.
  • Anatole was always content with his position, with himself, and with others.
  • Dolokhov, who had reappeared that year in Moscow after his exile and his Persian adventures, and was leading a life of luxury, gambling, and dissipation, associated with his old Petersburg comrade Kuragin and made use of him for his own ends.
  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.
  • Eh? said Anatole, with a good-humored laugh.
  • To her impatience and pining for him were now added the unpleasant recollection of her interview with Princess Mary and the old prince, and a fear and anxiety of which she did not understand the cause.
  • As soon as she began to think of him, the recollection of the old prince, of Princess Mary, of the theater, and of Kuragin mingled with her thoughts.
  • We have an excellent priest, he conducts the service decently and with dignity, and the deacon is the same.
  • Natasha had not time to take off the bodice before the door opened and Countess Bezukhova, dressed in a purple velvet gown with a high collar, came into the room beaming with good-humored amiable smiles.
  • Natasha brightened up and felt almost in love with this woman, who was so beautiful and so kind.
  • Helene for her part was sincerely delighted with Natasha and wished to give her a good time.
  • My brother dined with me yesterday--we nearly died of laughter--he ate nothing and kept sighing for you, my charmer!
  • He is madly, quite madly, in love with you, my dear.
  • And why not enjoy myself? thought Natasha, gazing at Helene with wide-open, wondering eyes.
  • I don't care to have anything to do with Bezukhova and don't advise you to; however, if you've promised--go.
  • Mademoiselle George, with her bare, fat, dimpled arms, and a red shawl draped over one shoulder, came into the space left vacant for her, and assumed an unnatural pose.
  • Natasha without saying anything stepped up to her father and looked at him with surprised inquiring eyes.
  • During the ecossaise, which she also danced with him, Anatole said nothing when they happened to be by themselves, but merely gazed at her.
  • Natasha, animated and excited, looked about her with wide-open frightened eyes and seemed merrier than usual.
  • Helene returned with Natasha to the drawing room.
  • Morning came with its cares and bustle.
  • Natasha kept looking uneasily at everybody with wide-open eyes, as if wishing to intercept every glance directed toward her, and tried to appear the same as usual.
  • Well, I had a talk with him....
  • If your betrothed comes here now--there will be no avoiding a quarrel; but alone with the old man he will talk things over and then come on to you.
  • So go, with God's blessing!
  • All that has happened, and now all is changed, she thought as she sat with the letter she had begun before her.
  • That's awful... and to escape from these dreadful thoughts she went to Sonya and began sorting patterns with her.
  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.
  • But with that one nothing is spoiled.
  • "Please, Miss!" whispered a maid entering the room with a mysterious air.
  • With trembling hands Natasha held that passionate love letter which Dolokhov had composed for Anatole, and as she read it she found in it an echo of all that she herself imagined she was feeling.
  • That evening Marya Dmitrievna was going to the Akharovs' and proposed to take the girls with her.
  • Clutching her breast to keep herself from choking, Sonya, pale and trembling with fear and agitation, sat down in an armchair and burst into tears.
  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wide-open eyes as if she could not grasp the question.
  • Don't talk nonsense, just listen! said Natasha, with momentary vexation.
  • How could you let him go so far? she went on, with a horror and disgust she could hardly conceal.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with astonishment.
  • Natasha repeated with a smile of pity at her friend's lack of comprehension.
  • I don't want to quarrel with you, but go, for God's sake go!
  • On Friday the Rostovs were to return to the country, but on Wednesday the count went with the prospective purchaser to his estate near Moscow.
  • Natasha, how glad I am you're not angry with me!
  • With the same expression of agitated surprise and guilt she went about the house, taking up now one occupation, now another, and at once abandoning them.
  • "She will run away with him!" thought Sonya.
  • At Kamenka a relay of horses was to wait which would take them to the Warsaw highroad, and from there they would hasten abroad with post horses.
  • Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhov's help.
  • In his large study, the walls of which were hung to the ceiling with Persian rugs, bearskins, and weapons, sat Dolokhov in a traveling cloak and high boots, at an open desk on which lay an abacus and some bundles of paper money.
  • Anatole, with uniform unbuttoned, walked to and fro from the room where the witnesses were sitting, through the study to the room behind, where his French valet and others were packing the last of his things.
  • "Yes, of course," returned Anatole, evidently not listening to Dolokhov and looking straight before him with a smile that did not leave his face.
  • Dolokhov banged down the lid of his desk and turned to Anatole with an ironic smile:
  • "Go to the devil!" cried Anatole and, clutching his hair, left the room, but returned at once and dropped into an armchair in front of Dolokhov with his feet turned under him.
  • Dolokhov with a cold smile and a gleam in his handsome insolent eyes looked at him--evidently wishing to get some more amusement out of him.
  • Balaga was a famous troyka driver who had known Dolokhov and Anatole some six years and had given them good service with his troykas.
  • More than once he had driven them through the town with gypsies and "ladykins" as he called the cocottes.
  • With others Balaga bargained, charging twenty-five rubles for a two hours' drive, and rarely drove himself, generally letting his young men do so.
  • But with "his gentlemen" he always drove himself and never demanded anything for his work.
  • Only a couple of times a year--when he knew from their valets that they had money in hand--he would turn up of a morning quite sober and with a deep bow would ask them to help him.
  • Balaga was a fair-haired, short, and snub-nosed peasant of about twenty- seven; red-faced, with a particularly red thick neck, glittering little eyes, and a small beard.
  • "When they are dead, what shall I drive?" said Balaga with a wink.
  • After refusing it for manners' sake, he drank it and wiped his mouth with a red silk handkerchief he took out of his cap.
  • "Do you know, one Christmas I drove from Tver," said Anatole, smilingly at the recollection and turning to Makarin who gazed rapturously at him with wide-open eyes.
  • "That time I'd harnessed two young side horses with the bay in the shafts," he went on, turning to Dolokhov.
  • Anatole went out of the room and returned a few minutes later wearing a fur coat girt with a silver belt, and a sable cap jauntily set on one side and very becoming to his handsome face.
  • Though they were all going with him, Anatole evidently wished to make something touching and solemn out of this address to his comrades.
  • "To your health!" said Balaga who also emptied his glass, and wiped his mouth with his handkerchief.
  • Makarin embraced Anatole with tears in his eyes.
  • I have heard what elopements are like, continued Dolokhov with a wink.
  • Anatole and Dolokhov got in with him.
  • Dolokhov, after Anatole entered, had remained at the wicket gate and was struggling with the yard porter who was trying to lock it.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, having found Sonya weeping in the corridor, made her confess everything, and intercepting the note to Natasha she read it and went into Natasha's room with it in her hand.
  • She entered the room with resolute steps.
  • Arranging meetings with lovers in my house!
  • Natasha did not change her position, but her whole body heaved with noiseless, convulsive sobs which choked her.
  • I shall die! she muttered, wrenching herself from Marya Dmitrievna's hands with a vicious effort and sinking down again into her former position.
  • Again Natasha's body shook with sobs.
  • And she burst into sobs with the despairing vehemence with which people bewail disasters they feel they have themselves occasioned.
  • But Natasha was not asleep; with pale face and fixed wide-open eyes she looked straight before her.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • With compressed and parched lips and dry fixed eyes, she sat at the window, uneasily watching the people who drove past and hurriedly glancing round at anyone who entered the room.
  • What is the matter with you, my angel?
  • And what can they want with me? thought he as he dressed to go to Marya Dmitrievna's.
  • In a sleigh drawn by two gray trotting-horses that were bespattering the dashboard with snow, Anatole and his constant companion Makarin dashed past.
  • His face was fresh and rosy, his white-plumed hat, tilted to one side, disclosed his curled and pomaded hair besprinkled with powdery snow.
  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.
  • When he opened the ballroom door Pierre saw Natasha sitting at the window, with a thin, pale, and spiteful face.
  • She glanced round at him, frowned, and left the room with an expression of cold dignity.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.
  • What troubles one has with these girls without their mother!
  • I will be frank with you.
  • Sonya entered the room with an agitated face.
  • Marya Dmitrievna is with her and she too asks you to come.
  • Natasha, pale and stern, was sitting beside Marya Dmitrievna, and her eyes, glittering feverishly, met Pierre with a questioning look the moment he entered.
  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."
  • She was evidently unable to speak and made a sign with her hands that they should leave her alone.
  • Anatole, for whom Pierre was looking, dined that day with Dolokhov, consulting him as to how to remedy this unfortunate affair.
  • In the evening he drove to his sister's to discuss with her how to arrange a meeting.
  • When Pierre returned home after vainly hunting all over Moscow, his valet informed him that Prince Anatole was with the countess.
  • She stopped, seeing in the forward thrust of her husband's head, in his glowing eyes and his resolute gait, the terrible indications of that rage and strength which she knew and had herself experienced after his duel with Dolokhov.
  • Anatole, come with me!
  • Anatole followed him with his usual jaunty step but his face betrayed anxiety.
  • You promised Countess Rostova to marry her and were about to elope with her, is that so?
  • He seized Anatole by the collar of his uniform with his big hand and shook him from side to side till Anatole's face showed a sufficient degree of terror.
  • "You're a scoundrel and a blackguard, and I don't know what deprives me from the pleasure of smashing your head with this!" said Pierre, expressing himself so artificially because he was talking French.
  • Amuse yourself with women like my wife--with them you are within your rights, for they know what you want of them.
  • Pierre paused and looked at Anatole no longer with an angry but with a questioning look.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre glanced at him with amazement, unable to understand what he wanted.
  • He was awaiting Prince Andrew's return with dread and went every day to the old prince's for news of him.
  • He seemed in better spirits than usual and awaited his son with great impatience.
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • Princess Mary looked at him with astonishment.
  • Still getting stouter? he said with animation, but the new wrinkle on his forehead deepened.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • "So Monsieur Kuragin has not honored Countess Rostova with his hand?" said Prince Andrew, and he snorted several times.
  • Prince Andrew talked incessantly, arguing now with his father, now with the Swiss tutor Dessalles, and showing an unnatural animation, the cause of which Pierre so well understood.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • He thought she would give him her hand as usual; but she, stepping up to him, stopped, breathing heavily, her arms hanging lifelessly just in the pose she used to stand in when she went to the middle of the ballroom to sing, but with quite a different expression of face.
  • All is over for me, she replied with shame and self- abasement.
  • All men seemed so pitiful, so poor, in comparison with this feeling of tenderness and love he experienced: in comparison with that softened, grateful, last look she had given him through her tears.
  • "Home!" said Pierre, and despite twenty-two degrees of frost Fahrenheit he threw open the bearskin cloak from his broad chest and inhaled the air with joy.
  • In Pierre, however, that comet with its long luminous tail aroused no feeling of fear.
  • To us, their descendants, who are not historians and are not carried away by the process of research and can therefore regard the event with unclouded common sense, an incalculable number of causes present themselves.
  • A deed done is irrevocable, and its result coinciding in time with the actions of millions of other men assumes an historic significance.
  • The higher a man stands on the social ladder, the more people he is connected with and the more power he has over others, the more evident is the predestination and inevitability of his every action.
  • And the botanist who finds that the apple falls because the cellular tissue decays and so forth is equally right with the child who stands under the tree and says the apple fell because he wanted to eat it and prayed for it.
  • Equally right or wrong is he who says that Napoleon went to Moscow because he wanted to, and perished because Alexander desired his destruction, and he who says that an undermined hill weighing a million tons fell because the last navvy struck it for the last time with his mattock.
  • In historic events the so-called great men are labels giving names to events, and like labels they have but the smallest connection with the event itself.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • He went in a traveling coach with six horses, surrounded by pages, aides-de-camp, and an escort, along the road to Posen, Thorn, Danzig, and Konigsberg.
  • At each of these towns thousands of people met him with excitement and enthusiasm.
  • On the tenth of June, * coming up with the army, he spent the night in apartments prepared for him on the estate of a Polish count in the Vilkavisski forest.
  • He rode across one of the swaying pontoon bridges to the farther side, turned sharply to the left, and galloped in the direction of Kovno, preceded by enraptured, mounted chasseurs of the Guard who, breathless with delight, galloped ahead to clear a path for him through the troops.
  • The colonel of the Polish uhlans, a handsome old man, flushed and, fumbling in his speech from excitement, asked the aide-de-camp whether he would be permitted to swim the river with his uhlans instead of seeking a ford.
  • The colonel and some of his men got across and with difficulty clambered out on the further bank.
  • The Emperor noticed her and honored her with a dance.
  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.
  • Helene, not having a suitable partner, herself offered to dance the mazurka with Boris.
  • The Emperor was not dancing, he stood in the doorway, stopping now one pair and now another with gracious words which he alone knew how to utter.
  • He took Balashev by the arm and crossed the room with him, unconsciously clearing a path seven yards wide as the people on both sides made way for him.
  • Boris noticed Arakcheev's excited face when the sovereign went out with Balashev.
  • Arakcheev looked at the Emperor from under his brow and, sniffing with his red nose, stepped forward from the crowd as if expecting the Emperor to address him.
  • Boris, fluttering as if he had not had time to withdraw, respectfully pressed close to the doorpost with bowed head.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • "Let no one know of it!" the Emperor added with a frown.
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • The noncommissioned officer began talking with his comrades about regimental matters without looking at the Russian general.
  • After living at the seat of the highest authority and power, after conversing with the Emperor less than three hours before, and in general being accustomed to the respect due to his rank in the service, Balashev found it very strange here on Russian soil to encounter this hostile, and still more this disrespectful, application of brute force to himself.
  • The French colonel with difficulty repressed a yawn, but was polite and evidently understood Balashev's importance.
  • They rode through the village of Rykonty, past tethered French hussar horses, past sentinels and men who saluted their colonel and stared with curiosity at a Russian uniform, and came out at the other end of the village.
  • In front of the group, on a black horse with trappings that glittered in the sun, rode a tall man with plumes in his hat and black hair curling down to his shoulders.
  • Balashev was only two horses' length from the equestrian with the bracelets, plumes, necklaces, and gold embroidery, who was galloping toward him with a theatrically solemn countenance, when Julner, the French colonel, whispered respectfully: "The King of Naples!"
  • On seeing the Russian general he threw back his head, with its long hair curling to his shoulders, in a majestically royal manner, and looked inquiringly at the French colonel.
  • "Charmed to make your acquaintance, General!" he added, with a gesture of kingly condescension.
  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
  • Murat's face beamed with stupid satisfaction as he listened to "Monsieur de Bal-macheve."
  • But royaute oblige! * and he felt it incumbent on him, as a king and an ally, to confer on state affairs with Alexander's envoy.
  • He dismounted, took Balashev's arm, and moving a few steps away from his suite, which waited respectfully, began to pace up and down with him, trying to speak significantly.
  • "Then you don't consider the Emperor Alexander the aggressor?" he asked unexpectedly, with a kindly and foolish smile.
  • And he went on to inquiries about the Grand Duke and the state of his health, and to reminiscences of the gay and amusing times he had spent with him in Naples.
  • This inevitability alone can explain how the cruel Arakcheev, who tore out a grenadier's mustache with his own hands, whose weak nerves rendered him unable to face danger, and who was neither an educated man nor a courtier, was able to maintain his powerful position with Alexander, whose own character was chivalrous, noble, and gentle.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • Balashev took out the packet containing the Emperor's letter and laid it on the table (made of a door with its hinges still hanging on it, laid across two barrels).
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • That day he dined with the marshal, at the same board on the barrels.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • His full face, rather young-looking, with its prominent chin, wore a gracious and majestic expression of imperial welcome.
  • He entered briskly, with a jerk at every step and his head slightly thrown back.
  • His whole short corpulent figure with broad thick shoulders, and chest and stomach involuntarily protruding, had that imposing and stately appearance one sees in men of forty who live in comfort.
  • He glanced with his large eyes into Balashav's face and immediately looked past him.
  • And he began clearly and concisely to explain his reasons for dissatisfaction with the Russian government.
  • Napoleon seemed to say, as with a scarcely perceptible smile he looked at Balashev's uniform and sword.
  • He said that the Emperor Alexander did not consider Kurakin's demand for his passports a sufficient cause for war; that Kurakin had acted on his own initiative and without his sovereign's assent, that the Emperor Alexander did not desire war, and had no relations with England.
  • And you offer me negotiations when I have expended millions, when you are in alliance with England, and when your position is a bad one.
  • I hear you have made peace with Turkey?
  • He evidently wanted to do all the talking himself, and continued to talk with the sort of eloquence and unrestrained irritability to which spoiled people are so prone.
  • Yes, I know you have made peace with the Turks without obtaining Moldavia and Wallachia; I would have given your sovereign those provinces as I gave him Finland.
  • But no, he has preferred to surround himself with my enemies, and with whom?
  • With Steins, Armfeldts, Bennigsens, and Wintzingerodes!
  • A sovereign should not be with the army unless he is a general! said Napoleon, evidently uttering these words as a direct challenge to the Emperor.
  • Their king was insane and they changed him for another-- Bernadotte, who promptly went mad--for no Swede would ally himself with Russia unless he were mad.
  • Balashev stood with downcast eyes, looking at the movements of Napoleon's stout legs and trying to avoid meeting his eyes.
  • "Know that if you stir up Prussia against me, I'll wipe it off the map of Europe!" he declared, his face pale and distorted by anger, and he struck one of his small hands energetically with the other.
  • But, to his surprise, Balashev received, through Duroc, an invitation to dine with the Emperor that day.
  • Balashev respectfully ventured to disagree with the French Emperor.
  • Napoleon sat down, toying with his Sevres coffee cup, and motioned Balashev to a chair beside him.
  • Napoleon was in that well-known after-dinner mood which, more than any reasoned cause, makes a man contented with himself and disposed to consider everyone his friend.
  • Napoleon turned to him with a pleasant, though slightly ironic, smile.
  • "And let him know that I will do so!" said Napoleon, rising and pushing his cup away with his hand.
  • Balashev bowed his head with an air indicating that he would like to make his bow and leave, and only listened because he could not help hearing what was said to him.
  • Again Napoleon brought out his snuffbox, paced several times up and down the room in silence, and then, suddenly and unexpectedly, went up to Balashev and with a slight smile, as confidently, quickly, and simply as if he were doing something not merely important but pleasing to Balashev, he raised his hand to the forty-year-old Russian general's face and, taking him by the ear, pulled it gently, smiling with his lips only.
  • "Are the horses ready for the general?" he added, with a slight inclination of his head in reply to Balashev's bow.
  • After his interview with Pierre in Moscow, Prince Andrew went to Petersburg, on business as he told his family, but really to meet Anatole Kuragin whom he felt it necessary to encounter.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • He was now concerned only with the nearest practical matters unrelated to his past interests, and he seized on these the more eagerly the more those past interests were closed to him.
  • As a general on duty on Kutuzov's staff, he applied himself to business with zeal and perseverance and surprised Kutuzov by his willingness and accuracy in work.
  • He entered through the gates with their stone pillars and drove up the avenue leading to the house as if he were entering an enchanted, sleeping castle.
  • And he began explaining why he could not put up with his daughter's unreasonable character.
  • "Ah, he has passed judgment... passed judgement!" said the old man in a low voice and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, with some embarrassment, but then he suddenly jumped up and cried: "Be off, be off!
  • The boy, curly- headed like his mother and glowing with health, sat on his knee, and Prince Andrew began telling him the story of Bluebeard, but fell into a reverie without finishing the story.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • When one thinks who and what--what trash--can cause people misery! he said with a malignity that alarmed Princess Mary.
  • She looked a little above Prince Andrew's head with the confident, accustomed look with which one looks at the place where a familiar portrait hangs.
  • The first army, with which was the Emperor, occupied the fortified camp at Drissa; the second army was retreating, trying to effect a junction with the first one from which it was said to be cut off by large French forces.
  • Everyone was dissatisfied with the general course of affairs in the Russian army, but no one anticipated any danger of invasion of the Russian provinces, and no one thought the war would extend farther than the western, the Polish, provinces.
  • Anatole Kuragin, whom Prince Andrew had hoped to find with the army, was not there.
  • The Emperor was with the first army, but not as commander-in-chief.
  • In the orders issued it was stated, not that the Emperor would take command, but only that he would be with the army.
  • The Emperor, moreover, had with him not a commander-in-chief's staff but the imperial headquarters staff.
  • With Pfuel was Wolzogen, who expressed Pfuel's thoughts in a more comprehensible way than Pfuel himself (who was a harsh, bookish theorist, self-confident to the point of despising everyone else) was able to do.
  • Pfuel and his adherents demanded a retirement into the depths of the country in accordance with precise laws defined by a pseudo-theory of war, and they saw only barbarism, ignorance, or evil intention in every deviation from that theory.
  • A man who simply wished to retain his lucrative post would today agree with Pfuel, tomorrow with his opponent, and the day after, merely to avoid responsibility or to please the Emperor, would declare that he had no opinion at all on the matter.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • A fourth while seemingly overwhelmed with work would often come accidentally under the Emperor's eye.
  • And that morning Colonel Michaud had ridden round the Drissa fortifications with the Emperor and had pointed out to him that this fortified camp constructed by Pfuel, and till then considered a chef-d'oeuvre of tactical science which would ensure Napoleon's destruction, was an absurdity, threatening the destruction of the Russian army.
  • Chernyshev was sitting at a window in the first room with a French novel in his hand.
  • Pfuel was short and very thin but broad-boned, of coarse, robust build, broad in the hips, and with prominent shoulder blades.
  • One could see that he wished to pass through the rooms as quickly as possible, finish with the bows and greetings, and sit down to business in front of a map, where he would feel at home.
  • He nodded hurriedly in reply to Chernyshev, and smiled ironically on hearing that the sovereign was inspecting the fortifications that he, Pfuel, had planned in accord with his theory.
  • From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.
  • On the contrary, the deviations made from his theory were, in his opinion, the sole cause of the whole disaster, and with characteristically gleeful sarcasm he would remark, "There, I said the whole affair would go to the devil!"
  • He said a few words to Prince Andrew and Chernyshev about the present war, with the air of a man who knows beforehand that all will go wrong, and who is not displeased that it should be so.
  • Marquis Paulucci was talking to him with particular warmth and the Emperor, with his head bent to the left, was listening with a dissatisfied air.
  • General Armfeldt has proposed a splendid position with an exposed rear, or why not this Italian gentleman's attack--very fine, or a retreat, also good!
  • But when Volkonski said, with a frown, that it was in the Emperor's name that he asked his opinion, Pfuel rose and, suddenly growing animated, began to speak:
  • The principles laid down by me must be strictly adhered to, said he, drumming on the table with his bony fingers.
  • Of all these men Prince Andrew sympathized most with Pfuel, angry, determined, and absurdly self-confident as he was.
  • And despite his self-confidence and grumpy German sarcasm he was pitiable, with his hair smoothly brushed on the temples and sticking up in tufts behind.
  • It is only because military men are invested with pomp and power and crowds of sychophants flatter power, attributing to it qualities of genius it does not possess.
  • And only in the ranks can one serve with assurance of being useful.
  • But now the campaign was beginning, and he had to remain with his regiment.
  • And since it had to be so, Nicholas Rostov, as was natural to him, felt contented with the life he led in the regiment and was able to find pleasure in that life.
  • For the Pavlograd hussars, however, the whole of this retreat during the finest period of summer and with sufficient supplies was a very simple and agreeable business.
  • First they camped gaily before Vilna, making acquaintance with the Polish landowners, preparing for reviews and being reviewed by the Emperor and other high commanders.
  • Then came an order to retreat to Sventsyani and destroy any provisions they could not carry away with them.
  • Rostov, smoking his pipe and turning his head about as the water trickled down his neck, listened inattentively, with an occasional glance at Ilyin, who was pressing close to him.
  • He recounted how Raevski had led his two sons onto the dam under terrific fire and had charged with them beside him.
  • And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
  • The doctor, whether from lack of means or because he did not like to part from his young wife in the early days of their marriage, took her about with him wherever the hussar regiment went and his jealousy had become a standing joke among the hussar officers.
  • Rostov threw his cloak over his shoulders, shouted to Lavrushka to follow with the things, and--now slipping in the mud, now splashing right through it--set off with Ilyin in the lessening rain and the darkness that was occasionally rent by distant lightning.
  • Rostov and Ilyin, on entering the room, were welcomed with merry shouts and laughter.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna obliged them with the loan of a petticoat to be used as a curtain, and behind that screen Rostov and Ilyin, helped by Lavrushka who had brought their kits, changed their wet things for dry ones.
  • A board was found, fixed on two saddles and covered with a horsecloth, a small samovar was produced and a cellaret and half a bottle of rum, and having asked Mary Hendrikhovna to preside, they all crowded round her.
  • All the officers appeared to be, and really were, in love with her that evening.
  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.
  • "Too hot!" she replied, blushing with pleasure.
  • When they had emptied the samovar, Rostov took a pack of cards and proposed that they should play "Kings" with Mary Hendrikhovna.
  • As soon as he had left the room all the officers burst into loud laughter and Mary Hendrikhovna blushed till her eyes filled with tears and thereby became still more attractive to them.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • Rostov riding in front gave the order "Forward!" and the hussars, with clanking sabers and subdued talk, their horses' hoofs splashing in the mud, defiled in fours and moved along the broad road planted with birch trees on each side, following the infantry and a battery that had gone on in front.
  • That curly grass which always grows by country roadsides became clearly visible, still wet with the night's rain; the drooping branches of the birches, also wet, swayed in the wind and flung down bright drops of water to one side.
  • A judge of horses and a sportsman, he had lately procured himself a large, fine, mettlesome, Donets horse, dun-colored, with light mane and tail, and when he rode it no one could outgallop him.
  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
  • He glanced with pity at the excited face of Ilyin, who talked much and in great agitation.
  • And with that light, and as if in reply to it, came the sound of guns ahead of them.
  • Before Rostov had had time to consider and determine the distance of that firing, Count Ostermann-Tolstoy's adjutant came galloping from Vitebsk with orders to advance at a trot along the road.
  • Our advanced line, already in action, could be heard briskly exchanging shots with the enemy in the dale.
  • Count Ostermann with his suite rode up behind the squadron, halted, spoke to the commander of the regiment, and rode up the hill to the guns.
  • Drawing himself up, he viewed the field of battle opening out before him from the hill, and with his whole soul followed the movement of the uhlans.
  • A captain, standing beside him, was gazing like himself with eyes fixed on the cavalry below them.
  • With the same feeling with which he had galloped across the path of a wolf, Rostov gave rein to his Donets horse and galloped to intersect the path of the dragoons' disordered lines.
  • With the same feeling with which he had galloped across the path of a wolf, Rostov gave rein to his Donets horse and galloped to intersect the path of the dragoons' disordered lines.
  • That Frenchman, by his uniform an officer, was going at a gallop, crouching on his gray horse and urging it on with his saber.
  • The French dragoon officer was hopping with one foot on the ground, the other being caught in the stirrup.
  • His eyes, screwed up with fear as if he every moment expected another blow, gazed up at Rostov with shrinking terror.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • Before Rostov had decided what to do with him, the officer cried, "I surrender!"
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • The hussars galloped hastily back with their prisoners.
  • Something vague and confused, which he could not at all account for, had come over him with the capture of that officer and the blow he had dealt him.
  • Yes, oh yes, that French officer with the dimple.
  • Rostov saw the prisoners being led away and galloped after them to have a look at his Frenchman with the dimple on his chin.
  • He glanced at Rostov with a feigned smile and waved his hand in greeting.
  • And how was he to blame, with his dimple and blue eyes?
  • The previous autumn, the hunting, "Uncle," and the Christmas holidays spent with Nicholas at Otradnoe were what she recalled oftenest and most painfully.
  • She kept away from everyone in the house and felt at ease only with her brother Petya.
  • She liked to be with him better than with the others, and when alone with him she sometimes laughed.
  • When she understood them her personal feeling became interwoven in the prayers with shades of its own.
  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.
  • Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.
  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.
  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.
  • She stood by her mother's side and exchanged nods with acquaintances near her.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • A comely, fresh-looking old man was conducting the service with that mild solemnity which has so elevating and soothing an effect on the souls of the worshipers.
  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.
  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • The priest came out with his purple velvet biretta on his head, adjusted his hair, and knelt down with an effort.
  • She listened to every word about the victory of Moses over Amalek, of Gideon over Midian, and of David over Goliath, and about the destruction of "Thy Jerusalem," and she prayed to God with the tenderness and emotion with which her heart was overflowing, but without fully understanding what she was asking of God in that prayer.
  • She shared with all her heart in the prayer for the spirit of righteousness, for the strengthening of the heart by faith and hope, and its animation by love.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • The French alphabet, written out with the same numerical values as the Hebrew, in which the first nine letters denote units and the others tens, will have the following significance:
  • How, or by what means, he was connected with the great event foretold in the Apocalypse he did not know, but he did not doubt that connection for a moment.
  • A few intimate friends were dining with the Rostovs that day, as usual on Sundays.
  • The Rostovs' footman rushed eagerly forward to help him off with his cloak and take his hat and stick.
  • Petya was now a handsome rosy lad of fifteen with full red lips and resembled Natasha.
  • "On my word, I don't know what I've done with it," he said.
  • Natasha entered with a softened and agitated expression of face and sat down looking silently at Pierre.
  • After dinner the count settled himself comfortably in an easy chair and with a serious face asked Sonya, who was considered an excellent reader, to read the appeal.
  • The enemy has entered the borders of Russia with immense forces.
  • The count listened with closed eyes, heaving abrupt sighs at certain passages.
  • Natasha sat erect, gazing with a searching look now at her father and now at Pierre.
  • "What a darling our Papa is!" she cried, kissing him, and she again looked at Pierre with the unconscious coquetry that had returned to her with her better spirits.
  • At this moment, Petya, to whom nobody was paying any attention, came up to his father with a very flushed face and said in his breaking voice that was now deep and now shrill:
  • Be quiet, I tell you! cried the count, with a glance at his wife, who had turned pale and was staring fixedly at her son.
  • Natasha's unwontedly brilliant eyes, continually glancing at him with a more than cordial look, had reduced him to this condition.
  • Why, you meant to spend the evening with us....
  • They looked at each other with dismayed and embarrassed faces.
  • When he came in to tea, silent, morose, and with tear-stained face, everybody pretended not to notice anything.
  • But the farther he went and the more his attention was diverted by the ever-increasing crowds moving toward the Kremlin, the less he remembered to walk with the sedateness and deliberation of a man.
  • But within the Trinity Gateway he was so pressed to the wall by people who probably were unaware of the patriotic intentions with which he had come that in spite of all his determination he had to give in, and stop while carriages passed in, rumbling beneath the archway.
  • After standing some time in the gateway, Petya tried to move forward in front of the others without waiting for all the carriages to pass, and he began resolutely working his way with his elbows, but the woman just in front of him, who was the first against whom he directed his efforts, angrily shouted at him:
  • Petya wiped his perspiring face with his hands and pulled up the damp collar which he had arranged so well at home to seem like a man's.
  • When the carriages had all passed in, the crowd, carrying Petya with it, streamed forward into the Kremlin Square which was already full of people.
  • Dear one! she kept repeating, wiping away her tears with her fingers.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • When he came to himself, a man of clerical appearance with a tuft of gray hair at the back of his head and wearing a shabby blue cassock--probably a church clerk and chanter--was holding him under the arm with one hand while warding off the pressure of the crowd with the other.
  • The clerk who had rescued Petya was talking to a functionary about the priests who were officiating that day with the bishop.
  • Two young citizens were joking with some serf girls who were cracking nuts.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • Suddenly the sound of a firing of cannon was heard from the embankment, to celebrate the signing of peace with the Turks, and the crowd rushed impetuously toward the embankment to watch the firing.
  • The people, with Petya among them, rushed toward the balcony.
  • Petya pushed her hand away with his knee, seized a biscuit, and as if fearing to be too late, again shouted "Hurrah!" with a voice already hoarse.
  • Count Ilya Rostov, in a military uniform of Catherine's time, was sauntering with a pleasant smile among the crowd, with all of whom he was acquainted.
  • He too approached that group and listened with a kindly smile and nods of approval, as he always did, to what the speaker was saying.
  • The retired naval man was speaking very boldly, as was evident from the expression on the faces of the listeners and from the fact that some people Pierre knew as the meekest and quietest of men walked away disapprovingly or expressed disagreement with him.
  • The nobility don't gwudge theah lives--evewy one of us will go and bwing in more wecwuits, and the sov'weign" (that was the way he referred to the Emperor) "need only say the word and we'll all die fo' him!" added the orator with animation.
  • Count Rostov's mouth watered with pleasure and he nudged Pierre, but Pierre wanted to speak himself.
  • (He was well acquainted with the senator, but thought it necessary on this occasion to address him formally.)
  • With a sudden expression of malevolence on his aged face, Adraksin shouted at Pierre:
  • Many voices shouted and talked at the same time, so that Count Rostov had not time to signify his approval of them all, and the group increased, dispersed, re-formed, and then moved with a hum of talk into the largest hall and to the big table.
  • Many spoke eloquently and with originality.
  • With an incessant hum of voices the crowd advanced to the table.
  • At that moment Count Rostopchin with his protruding chin and alert eyes, wearing the uniform of a general with sash over his shoulder, entered the room, stepping briskly to the front of the crowd of gentry.
  • Their chairs made a scraping noise as the gentlemen who had conferred rose with apparent relief, and began walking up and down, arm in arm, to stretch their legs and converse in couples.
  • "Gentlemen!" said the Emperor with a quivering voice.
  • There was a rustling among the crowd and it again subsided, so that Pierre distinctly heard the pleasantly human voice of the Emperor saying with emotion:
  • "Yes, most precious... a royal word," said Count Rostov, with a sob.
  • Pierre was among those who saw him come out from the merchants' hall with tears of emotion in his eyes.
  • The other was the mayor, a man with a thin sallow face and narrow beard.
  • He now felt ashamed of his speech with its constitutional tendency and sought an opportunity of effacing it.
  • But all these hints at what happened, both from the French side and the Russian, are advanced only because they fit in with the event.
  • The Emperor was with the army to encourage it, but his presence and ignorance of what steps to take, and the enormous number of advisers and plans, destroyed the first army's energy and it retired.
  • Lubomirski, Bronnitski, Wlocki, and the others of that group stirred up so much trouble that Barclay, under pretext of sending papers to the Emperor, dispatched these Polish adjutants general to Petersburg and plunged into an open struggle with Bennigsen and the Tsarevich.
  • Despite his seniority in rank Bagration, in this contest of magnanimity, took his orders from Barclay, but, having submitted, agreed with him less than ever.
  • He wrote to Arakcheev, the Emperor's confidant: It must be as my sovereign pleases, but I cannot work with the Minister (meaning Barclay).
  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
  • You've made me quarrel with my son!
  • At the end of the week the prince reappeared and resumed his former way of life, devoting himself with special activity to building operations and the arrangement of the gardens and completely breaking off his relations with Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • You plotted against me, you lied to Prince Andrew about my relations with that Frenchwoman and made me quarrel with him, but you see I need neither her nor you!
  • Princess Mary spent half of every day with little Nicholas, watching his lessons, teaching him Russian and music herself, and talking to Dessalles; the rest of the day she spent over her books, with her old nurse, or with "God's folk" who sometimes came by the back door to see her.
  • The princesses Aline and Sophie sit whole days with me, and we, unhappy widows of live men, make beautiful conversations over our 'charpie', only you, my friend, are missing... and so on.
  • "He writes about this war," said the prince, with the ironic smile that had become habitual to him in speaking of the present war.
  • "No, don't!" he exclaimed with a frown.
  • The old prince returned with quick steps, accompanied by Michael Ivanovich, bringing the letter and a plan.
  • "Always busy," replied Michael Ivanovich with a respectfully ironic smile which caused Princess Mary to turn pale.
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • So he called Tikhon and went through the rooms with him to show him where to set up the bed for that night.
  • With the help of a footman Tikhon brought in the bedstead and began putting it up.
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
  • "No peace, damn them!" he muttered, angry he knew not with whom.
  • He recalled all the words spoken at that first meeting with Potemkin.
  • To get back to that time and have done with all the present!
  • Dessalles wrote this letter to the Governor for Princess Mary, she signed it, and it was given to Alpatych with instructions to hand it to the Governor and to come back as quickly as possible if there was danger.
  • Three well-fed roans stood ready harnessed to a small conveyance with a leather hood.
  • The larger bell was muffled and the little bells on the harness stuffed with paper.
  • The prince allowed no one at Bald Hills to drive with ringing bells; but on a long journey Alpatych liked to have them.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • Everything not connected with the execution of the prince's orders did not interest and did not even exist for Alpatych.
  • He was a stout, dark, red- faced peasant in the forties, with thick lips, a broad knob of a nose, similar knobs over his black frowning brows, and a round belly.
  • 'One man though undone is but one,' as the proverb says, but with thirteen in your family and all the property...
  • An official ran out, said some words to a merchant, called a stout official with a cross hanging on his neck to follow him, and vanished again, evidently wishing to avoid the inquiring looks and questions addressed to him.
  • "To his Honor Baron Asch, from General-in-Chief Prince Bolkonski," he announced with such solemnity and significance that the official turned to him and took the letters.
  • Carts piled high with household utensils, chairs, and cupboards kept emerging from the gates of the yards and moving along the streets.
  • 'Take me away,' says she, 'don't let me perish with my little children!
  • "You brute, you murderer!" screamed a thin, pale woman who, with a baby in her arms and her kerchief torn from her head, burst through the door at that moment and down the steps into the yard.
  • "With our business, how can we get away?" said Ferapontov.
  • Alpatych collected his parcels, handed them to the coachman who had come in, and settled up with the innkeeper.
  • But these sounds were hardly heard in comparison with the noise of the firing outside the town and attracted little attention from the inhabitants.
  • Ferapontov's wife, who till then had not ceased wailing under the shed, became quiet and with the baby in her arms went to the gate, listening to the sounds and looking in silence at the people.
  • With lively curiosity everyone tried to get a glimpse of the projectiles as they flew over their heads.
  • "What are you staring at?" he shouted to the cook, who in her red skirt, with sleeves rolled up, swinging her bare elbows, had stepped to the corner to listen to what was being said.
  • At that moment the pitiful wailing of women was heard from different sides, the frightened baby began to cry, and people crowded silently with pale faces round the cook.
  • Inside the shed Alpatych and the coachman arranged the tangled reins and traces of their horses with trembling hands.
  • As Alpatych was driving out of the gate he saw some ten soldiers in Ferapontov's open shop, talking loudly and filling their bags and knapsacks with flour and sunflower seeds.
  • The flames now died down and were lost in the black smoke, now suddenly flared up again brightly, lighting up with strange distinctness the faces of the people crowding at the crossroads.
  • "You are a colonel?" shouted the chief of staff with a German accent, in a voice familiar to Prince Andrew.
  • They marched with handkerchiefs tied over their noses and mouths.
  • Everything that reminded him of his past was repugnant to him, and so in his relations with that former circle he confined himself to trying to do his duty and not to be unfair.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • Alpatych turned his face to Prince Andrew, looked at him, and suddenly with a solemn gesture raised his arm.
  • On seeing the young master, the elder one with frightened look clutched her younger companion by the hand and hid with her behind a birch tree, not stopping to pick up some green plums they had dropped.
  • One fair-haired young soldier of the third company, whom Prince Andrew knew and who had a strap round the calf of one leg, crossed himself, stepped back to get a good run, and plunged into the water; another, a dark noncommissioned officer who was always shaggy, stood up to his waist in the water joyfully wriggling his muscular figure and snorted with satisfaction as he poured the water over his head with hands blackened to the wrists.
  • The officer, Timokhin, with his red little nose, standing on the dam wiping himself with a towel, felt confused at seeing the prince, but made up his mind to address him nevertheless.
  • He decided that he would rather wash himself with water in the barn.
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.
  • That same day Kutuzov was appointed commander-in- chief with full powers over the armies and over the whole region occupied by them.
  • Prince Vasili entered the room with the air of a happy conqueror who has attained the object of his desires.
  • He sees well enough, said Prince Vasili rapidly, in a deep voice and with a slight cough--the voice and cough with which he was wont to dispose of all difficulties.
  • He is a second autocrat, he concluded with a victorious smile.
  • I know for a fact that Kutuzov made it an absolute condition that the Tsarevich should not be with the army.
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • Followed by Lelorgne d'Ideville, an interpreter, he overtook Napoleon at a gallop and reined in his horse with an amused expression.
  • Several adjutants galloped off, and an hour later, Lavrushka, the serf Denisov had handed over to Rostov, rode up to Napoleon in an orderly's jacket and on a French cavalry saddle, with a merry, and tipsy face.
  • "The Cossack, not knowing in what company he was, for Napoleon's plain appearance had nothing about it that would reveal to an Oriental mind the presence of a monarch, talked with extreme familiarity of the incidents of the war," says Thiers, narrating this episode.
  • He found the Cossacks, inquired for the regiment operating with Platov's detachment and by evening found his master, Nicholas Rostov, quartered at Yankovo.
  • Rostov was just mounting to go for a ride round the neighboring villages with Ilyin; he let Lavrushka have another horse and took him along with him.
  • But while himself remaining, he gave instructions for the departure of the princess and Dessalles with the little prince to Bogucharovo and thence to Moscow.
  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.
  • Suddenly several men came running up the avenue with frightened faces.
  • She had noticed with what dissatisfaction he turned from the look she sometimes involuntarily fixed on him.
  • She recalled all her life with him and in every word and act of his found an expression of his love of her.
  • But she drove these thoughts away with disgust.
  • That sincerity which often comes with waking showed her clearly what chiefly concerned her about her father's illness.
  • On waking she listened to what was going on behind the door and, hearing him groan, said to herself with a sigh that things were still the same.
  • He was lying on his back propped up high, and his small bony hands with their knotted purple veins were lying on the quilt; his left eye gazed straight before him, his right eye was awry, and his brows and lips motionless.
  • The comic efforts with which he moved his tongue made her drop her eyes and with difficulty repress the sobs that rose to her throat.
  • Unconsciously imitating her father, she now tried to express herself as he did, as much as possible by signs, and her tongue too seemed to move with difficulty.
  • He glanced at her with timid surprise.
  • He's with the army, Father, at Smolensk.
  • Princess Mary murmured, pacing the garden with hurried steps and pressing her hands to her bosom which heaved with convulsive sobs.
  • The doctor came out with an agitated face and said she could not enter.
  • Why are these people with frightened faces stopping me?
  • Then they dressed him in uniform with his decorations and placed his shriveled little body on a table.
  • Toward night candles were burning round his coffin, a pall was spread over it, the floor was strewn with sprays of juniper, a printed band was tucked in under his shriveled head, and in a corner of the room sat a chanter reading the psalms.
  • Just as horses shy and snort and gather about a dead horse, so the inmates of the house and strangers crowded into the drawing room round the coffin--the Marshal, the village Elder, peasant women--and all with fixed and frightened eyes, crossing themselves, bowed and kissed the old prince's cold and stiffened hand.
  • The old prince used to approve of them for their endurance at work when they came to Bald Hills to help with the harvest or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked them for their boorishness.
  • As birds migrate to somewhere beyond the sea, so these men with their wives and children streamed to the southeast, to parts where none of them had ever been.
  • Now in 1812, to anyone living in close touch with these people it was apparent that these undercurrents were acting strongly and nearing an eruption.
  • Though the peasants paid quitrent, Alpatych thought no difficulty would be made about complying with this order, for there were two hundred and thirty households at work in Bogucharovo and the peasants were well to do.
  • His excellency Prince Andrew himself gave me orders to move all the people away and not leave them with the enemy, and there is an order from the Tsar about it too.
  • Having wrung a submissive "I understand" from Dron, Alpatych contented himself with that, though he not only doubted but felt almost certain that without the help of troops the carts would not be forthcoming.
  • (This was before his talk with Dron.)
  • She lay on the sofa with her face to the wall, fingering the buttons of the leather cushion and seeing nothing but that cushion, and her confused thoughts were centered on one subject--the irrevocability of death and her own spiritual baseness, which she had not suspected, but which had shown itself during her father's illness.
  • She felt sorry for her and held out her hand with a glance of gentle inquiry.
  • I understand that you could not, and cannot, think of yourself, but with my love for you I must do so....
  • Princess Mary read the paper, and her face began to quiver with stifled sobs.
  • The demands of life, which had seemed to her annihilated by her father's death, all at once rose before her with a new, previously unknown force and took possession of her.
  • Neither could the architect Michael Ivanovich, who on being sent for came in with sleepy eyes, tell Princess Mary anything.
  • The old valet Tikhon, with sunken, emaciated face that bore the stamp of inconsolable grief, replied: "Yes, Princess" to all Princess Mary's questions and hardly refrained from sobbing as he looked at her.
  • At length Dron, the village Elder, entered the room and with a deep bow to Princess Mary came to a halt by the doorpost.
  • "We are all in God's hands," said he, with a sigh.
  • An hour later Dunyasha came to tell the princess that Dron had come, and all the peasants had assembled at the barn by the princess' order and wished to have word with their mistress.
  • On the contrary, I ask you to go with all your belongings to our estate near Moscow, and I promise you I will see to it that there you shall want for nothing.
  • All eyes were gazing at her with one and the same expression.
  • "But you can't have understood me," said Princess Mary with a sad smile.
  • With drooping head Princess Mary left the crowd and went back to the house.
  • Having repeated her order to Dron to have horses ready for her departure next morning, she went to her room and remained alone with her own thoughts.
  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
  • She vividly recalled the moment when he had his first stroke and was being dragged along by his armpits through the garden at Bald Hills, muttering something with his helpless tongue, twitching his gray eyebrows and looking uneasily and timidly at her.
  • And she recalled in all its detail the night at Bald Hills before he had the last stroke, when with a foreboding of disaster she had remained at home against his will.
  • "Dear-est!" she repeated, and began sobbing, with tears that relieved her soul.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • With wide-open eyes she gazed at the moonlight and the shadows, expecting every moment to see his dead face, and she felt that the silence brooding over the house and within it held her fast.
  • On the way to Bogucharovo, a princely estate with a dwelling house and farm where they hoped to find many domestic serfs and pretty girls, they questioned Lavrushka about Napoleon and laughed at his stories, and raced one another to try Ilyin's horse.
  • Two tall old peasants with wrinkled faces and scanty beards emerged from the tavern, smiling, staggering, and singing some incoherent song, and approached the officers.
  • "What do you want, my pretty?" said Ilyin with a smile.
  • "May I make bold to trouble your honor?" said he respectfully, but with a shade of contempt for the youthfulness of this officer and with a hand thrust into his bosom.
  • She turned away, and then, as if fearing he might take her words as meant to move him to pity, looked at him with an apprehensive glance of inquiry.
  • Princess Mary noticed this and glanced gratefully at him with that radiant look which caused the plainness of her face to be forgotten.
  • Rostov, knitting his brows, left the room with another low bow.
  • Rostov glanced angrily at Ilyin and without replying strode off with rapid steps to the village.
  • Alpatych at a gliding trot, only just managing not to run, kept up with him with difficulty.
  • Without considering what he would do he moved unconciously with quick, resolute steps toward the crowd.
  • You'll dig up your pot of money and take it away with you....
  • Hey? shouted Rostov, coming up to the crowd with quick steps.
  • What do you want with him?... asked Karp.
  • With a pale and frowning face Dron stepped out of the crowd.
  • Bind him, Lavrushka! shouted Rostov, as if that order, too, could not possibly meet with any opposition.
  • I said then that it was not in order, voices were heard bickering with one another.
  • "Yes, they worked all day and didn't play!" remarked the tall, round- faced peasant gravely, pointing with a significant wink at the dictionaries that were on the top.
  • If we had had only peasants to fight, we should not have let the enemy come so far, said he with a sense of shame and wishing to change the subject.
  • But the princess, if she did not again thank him in words, thanked him with the whole expression of her face, radiant with gratitude and tenderness.
  • His kind, honest eyes, with the tears rising in them when she herself had begun to cry as she spoke of her loss, did not leave her memory.
  • When she had taken leave of him and remained alone she suddenly felt her eyes filling with tears, and then not for the first time the strange question presented itself to her: did she love him?
  • On the rest of the way to Moscow, though the princess' position was not a cheerful one, Dunyasha, who went with her in the carriage, more than once noticed that her mistress leaned out of the window and smiled at something with an expression of mingled joy and sorrow.
  • The lieutenant colonel turned to a smart orderly, who, with the peculiar contempt with which a commander-in- chief's orderly speaks to officers, replied:
  • The lieutenant colonel of hussars smiled beneath his mustache at the orderly's tone, dismounted, gave his horse to a dispatch runner, and approached Bolkonski with a slight bow.
  • It's awful with those sausage eaters!
  • I'm Lieutenant Colonel Denisov, better known as 'Vaska,' said Denisov, pressing Prince Andrew's hand and looking into his face with a particularly kindly attention.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • The plan was based on the fact that the French line of operation was too extended, and it proposed that instead of, or concurrently with, action on the front to bar the advance of the French, we should attack their line of communication.
  • In the midst of his explanation shouts were heard from the army, growing more incoherent and more diffused, mingling with music and songs and coming from the field where the review was held.
  • Kutuzov was impatiently urging on his horse, which ambled smoothly under his weight, and he raised his hand to his white Horse Guard's cap with a red band and no peak, nodding his head continually.
  • Suddenly his face assumed a subtle expression, he shrugged his shoulders with an air of perplexity.
  • And with such fine fellows to retreat and retreat!
  • He was wearing the white Horse Guard's cap and a military overcoat with a whip hanging over his shoulder by a thin strap.
  • He drew his left foot out of the stirrup and, lurching with his whole body and puckering his face with the effort, raised it with difficulty onto the saddle, leaned on his knee, groaned, and slipped down into the arms of the Cossacks and adjutants who stood ready to assist him.
  • He pulled himself together, looked round, screwing up his eyes, glanced at Prince Andrew, and, evidently not recognizing him, moved with his waddling gait to the porch.
  • As often occurs with old men, it was only after some seconds that the impression produced by Prince Andrew's face linked itself up with Kutuzov's remembrance of his personality.
  • Kutuzov looked at him with eyes wide open with dismay and then took off his cap and crossed himself:
  • He sighed and pressed on the bench with both hands to raise himself.
  • Come with me, we'll have a talk, said he.
  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.
  • His plan seemed decidedly a good one, especially from the strength of conviction with which he spoke.
  • And from that hut, while Denisov was speaking, a general with a portfolio under his arm really did appear.
  • Kutuzov swayed his head, as much as to say: "How is one man to deal with it all?" and again listened to Denisov.
  • Several times on glancing that way he noticed behind that door a plump, rosy, handsome woman in a pink dress with a lilac silk kerchief on her head, holding a dish and evidently awaiting the entrance of the commander-in-chief.
  • Her husband has welcomed his Serene Highness with the cross at the church, and she intends to welcome him in the house....
  • She's very pretty, added the adjutant with a smile.
  • Into the stove... into the fire with it!
  • I tell you once for all, my dear fellow," said he, "into the fire with all such things!
  • "Well, that's all!" said Kutuzov as he signed the last of the documents, and rising heavily and smoothing out the folds in his fat white neck he moved toward the door with a more cheerful expression.
  • He screwed up his eyes, smiled, lifted her chin with his hand, and said:
  • The priest's wife smiled, and with dimples in her rosy cheeks followed him into the room.
  • The adjutant came out to the porch and asked Prince Andrew to lunch with him.
  • He had in his hand a French book which he closed as Prince Andrew entered, marking the place with a knife.
  • If I decline the honor of being with you, believe me...
  • I remember, yes, I remember you with the standard! said Kutuzov, and a flush of pleasure suffused Prince Andrew's face at this recollection.
  • Go your way and God be with you.
  • He stormed fortresses with thirty thousand men.
  • So it was now with the inhabitants of Moscow.
  • In the corner room at the club, members gathered to read these broadsheets, and some liked the way Karpushka jeered at the French, saying: They will swell up with Russian cabbage, burst with our buckwheat porridge, and choke themselves with cabbage soup.
  • They are all dwarfs and one peasant woman will toss three of them with a hayfork.
  • "You don't spare anyone," said Julie Drubetskaya as she collected and pressed together a bunch of raveled lint with her thin, beringed fingers.
  • "We were just talking of you," she said with the facility in lying natural to a society woman.
  • "No," said Pierre, with a laughing glance at his big, stout body.
  • Julie asked Pierre with a knowing smile.
  • I know you were friendly with Natalie, and so... but I was always more friendly with Vera--that dear Vera.
  • I spent the evening with her yesterday.
  • She is going to their estate near Moscow either today or tomorrow morning, with her nephew.
  • Only the eldest princess, the one with the stony face and long waist, was still living in Pierre's house.
  • It is essential for him to combine his movements with those of the commander-in-chief.
  • The flogging was only just over, and the executioner was releasing from the flogging bench a stout man with red whiskers, in blue stockings and a green jacket, who was moaning piteously.
  • With a frightened and suffering look resembling that on the thin Frenchman's face, Pierre pushed his way in through the crowd.
  • The stout man rose, frowned, shrugged his shoulders, and evidently trying to appear firm began to pull on his jacket without looking about him, but suddenly his lips trembled and he began to cry, in the way full-blooded grown-up men cry, though angry with himself for doing so.
  • He was not occupied with the question of what to sacrifice for; the fact of sacrificing in itself afforded him a new and joyous sensation.
  • So it happened that throughout the whole battle the Russians opposed the entire French army launched against our left flank with but half as many men.
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • The wounded, bandaged with rags, with pale cheeks, compressed lips, and knitted brows, held on to the sides of the carts as they were jolted against one another.
  • Almost all of them stared with naive, childlike curiosity at Pierre's white hat and green swallow-tail coat.
  • The cavalry regiment, as it descended the hill with its singers, surrounded Pierre's carriage and blocked the road.
  • One of the carts with wounded stopped by the side of the road close to Pierre.
  • One of the wounded, an old soldier with a bandaged arm who was following the cart on foot, caught hold of it with his sound hand and turned to look at Pierre.
  • But beneath the slope, by the cart with the wounded near the panting little nag where Pierre stood, it was damp, somber, and sad.
  • The soldier with the swollen cheek looked angrily at the cavalry singers.
  • The peasants--even they have to go, said the soldier behind the cart, addressing Pierre with a sad smile.
  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
  • "Why should you be God knows where out of sight, during the battle?" he said, exchanging glances with his young companion.
  • "I would go with you but on my honor I'm up to here"--and he pointed to his throat.
  • And by some latent sequence of thought the descent of the Mozhaysk hill, the carts with the wounded, the ringing bells, the slanting rays of the sun, and the songs of the cavalrymen vividly recurred to his mind.
  • When he had ascended the hill and reached the little village street, he saw for the first time peasant militiamen in their white shirts and with crosses on their caps, who, talking and laughing loudly, animated and perspiring, were at work on a huge knoll overgrown with grass to the right of the road.
  • From above on the left, bisecting that amphitheater, wound the Smolensk highroad, passing through a village with a white church some five hundred paces in front of the knoll and below it.
  • "I must ask someone who knows," he thought, and addressed an officer who was looking with curiosity at his huge unmilitary figure.
  • One can see them with the naked eye...
  • The officer pointed with his hand to the smoke visible on the left beyond the river, and the same stern and serious expression that Pierre had noticed on many of the faces he had met came into his face.
  • Pierre pointed to another knoll in the distance with a big tree on it, near a village that lay in a hollow where also some campfires were smoking and something black was visible.
  • "Our position?" replied the officer with a smile of satisfaction.
  • There's our center, at Borodino, just there, and he pointed to the village in front of them with the white church.
  • First along the dusty road came the infantry in ranks, bareheaded and with arms reversed.
  • Following the battalion that marched along the dusty road came priests in their vestments--one little old man in a hood with attendants and singers.
  • Behind them soldiers and officers bore a large, dark-faced icon with an embossed metal cover.
  • Behind, before, and on both sides, crowds of militiamen with bared heads walked, ran, and bowed to the ground.
  • The hot rays of the sun beat down vertically and a fresh soft wind played with the hair of the bared heads and with the ribbons decorating the icon.
  • Someone, a very important personage judging by the haste with which way was made for him, was approaching the icon.
  • With a long overcoat on his exceedingly stout, round-shouldered body, with uncovered white head and puffy face showing the white ball of the eye he had lost, Kutuzov walked with plunging, swaying gait into the crowd and stopped behind the priest.
  • With a long overcoat on his exceedingly stout, round-shouldered body, with uncovered white head and puffy face showing the white ball of the eye he had lost, Kutuzov walked with plunging, swaying gait into the crowd and stopped behind the priest.
  • He crossed himself with an accustomed movement, bent till he touched the ground with his hand, and bowed his white head with a deep sigh.
  • His white head twitched with the effort.
  • At last he rose, kissed the icon as a child does with naively pouting lips, and again bowed till he touched the ground with his hand.
  • Boris Drubetskoy, brushing his knees with his hand (he had probably soiled them when he, too, had knelt before the icon), came up to him smiling.
  • Boris was elegantly dressed, with a slightly martial touch appropriate to a wartime wedding.
  • But if you want to ride round the position, come along with us.
  • Then when we get back, do spend the night with me and we'll arrange a game of cards.
  • "Ah, Kaysarov!" said Boris, addressing him with an unembarrassed smile, "I was just trying to explain our position to the count.
  • Just then Boris, with his courtierlike adroitness, stepped up to Pierre's side near Kutuzov and in a most natural manner, without raising his voice, said to Pierre, as though continuing an interrupted conversation:
  • "A matchless people!" he repeated with a sigh.
  • And as often happens with old people, Kutuzov began looking about absent-mindedly as if forgetting all he wanted to say or do.
  • Pierre looked at Dolokhov with a smile, not knowing what to say to him.
  • With tears in his eyes Dolokhov embraced Pierre and kissed him.
  • Boris said a few words to his general, and Count Bennigsen turned to Pierre and proposed that he should ride with him along the line.
  • Half an hour later Kutuzov left for Tatarinova, and Bennigsen and his suite, with Pierre among them, set out on their ride along the line.
  • In the middle of the wood a brown hare with white feet sprang out and, scared by the tramp of the many horses, grew so confused that it leaped along the road in front of them for some time, arousing general attention and laughter, and only when several voices shouted at it did it dart to one side and disappear in the thicket.
  • Here, at the extreme left flank, Bennigsen talked a great deal and with much heat, and, as it seemed to Pierre, gave orders of great military importance.
  • Through a gap in the broken wall he could see, beside the wooden fence, a row of thirty year-old birches with their lower branches lopped off, a field on which shocks of oats were standing, and some bushes near which rose the smoke of campfires-- the soldiers' kitchens.
  • Glory, the good of society, love of a woman, the Fatherland itself--how important these pictures appeared to me, with what profound meaning they seemed to be filled!
  • I made romantic plans of love and happiness with her!
  • He looked at the row of birches shining in the sunshine, with their motionless green and yellow foliage and white bark.
  • And the birches with their light and shade, the curly clouds, the smoke of the campfires, and all that was around him changed and seemed terrible and menacing.
  • The officers were about to take leave, but Prince Andrew, apparently reluctant to be left alone with his friend, asked them to stay and have tea.
  • The officers gazed with surprise at Pierre's huge stout figure and listened to his talk of Moscow and the position of our army, round which he had ridden.
  • Pierre looked at Timokhin with the condescendingly interrogative smile with which everybody involuntarily addressed that officer.
  • "Why, so as not to lay waste the country we were abandoning to the enemy," said Prince Andrew with venomous irony.
  • The fact is that those men with whom you have ridden round the position not only do not help matters, but hinder.
  • Prince Andrew went out of the shed with them, giving final orders to the adjutant.
  • "Extend widely!" said Prince Andrew with an angry snort, when they had ridden past.
  • "Yes, yes," muttered Pierre, looking with shining eyes at Prince Andrew.
  • I quite agree with you!
  • Such magnanimity and sensibility are like the magnanimity and sensibility of a lady who faints when she sees a calf being killed: she is so kindhearted that she can't look at blood, but enjoys eating the calf served up with sauce.
  • Pierre replied, looking at Prince Andrew with frightened, compassionate eyes.
  • Natasha with animated and excited face was telling him how she had gone to look for mushrooms the previous summer and had lost her way in the big forest.
  • She incoherently described the depths of the forest, her feelings, and a talk with a beekeeper she met, and constantly interrupted her story to say: No, I can't!
  • He only saw in her a pretty and fresh young girl, with whom he did not deign to unite his fate.
  • Slightly snorting and grunting, he presented now his back and now his plump hairy chest to the brush with which his valet was rubbing him down.
  • Another valet, with his finger over the mouth of a bottle, was sprinkling Eau de Cologne on the Emperor's pampered body with an expression which seemed to say that he alone knew where and how much Eau de Cologne should be sprinkled.
  • Two valets rapidly dressed His Majesty, and wearing the blue uniform of the Guards he went with firm quick steps to the reception room.
  • But Napoleon had dressed and come out with such unexpected rapidity that he had not time to finish arranging the surprise.
  • "I'll see you later," he added, and summoned de Beausset, who by that time had prepared the surprise, having placed something on the chairs and covered it with a cloth.
  • De Beausset bowed low, with that courtly French bow which only the old retainers of the Bourbons knew how to make, and approached him, presenting an envelope.
  • An aide-de-camp approached with gliding steps and offered him a gold snuffbox, which he took.
  • With courtly adroitness de Beausset half turned and without turning his back to the Emperor retired two steps, twitching off the cloth at the same time, and said:
  • A very pretty curly-headed boy with a look of the Christ in the Sistine Madonna was depicted playing at stick and ball.
  • Though it was not clear what the artist meant to express by depicting the so-called King of Rome spiking the earth with a stick, the allegory apparently seemed to Napoleon, as it had done to all who had seen it in Paris, quite clear and very pleasing.
  • "The King of Rome!" he said, pointing to the portrait with a graceful gesture.
  • With the natural capacity of an Italian for changing the expression of his face at will, he drew nearer to the portrait and assumed a look of pensive tenderness.
  • Let our remotest posterity recall your achievements this day with pride.
  • "Take him away!" he said, pointing with a gracefully majestic gesture to the portrait.
  • Having inspected the country opposite the Shevardino Redoubt, Napoleon pondered a little in silence and then indicated the spots where two batteries should be set up by the morrow to act against the Russian entrenchments, and the places where, in line with them, the field artillery should be placed.
  • These dispositions, of which the French historians write with enthusiasm and other historians with profound respect, were as follows:
  • At the same time the commander of the artillery of the 1st Corps, General Pernetti, with thirty cannon of Campan's division and all the howitzers of Dessaix's and Friant's divisions, will move forward, open fire, and overwhelm with shellfire the enemy's battery, against which will operate:
  • General Sorbier must be ready at the first order to advance with all the howitzers of the Guard's artillery against either one or other of the entrenchments.
  • After the advance has begun in this manner, orders will be given in accordance with the enemy's movements.
  • In the disposition it is said first that the batteries placed on the spot chosen by Napoleon, with the guns of Pernetti and Fouche; which were to come in line with them, 102 guns in all, were to open fire and shower shells on the Russian fleches and redoubts.
  • But in the disposition it is said that, after the fight has commenced in this manner, orders will be given in accordance with the enemy's movements, and so it might be supposed that all necessary arrangements would be made by Napoleon during the battle.
  • So the way in which these people killed one another was not decided by Napoleon's will but occurred independently of him, in accord with the will of hundreds of thousands of people who took part in the common action.
  • An attendant came in with punch.
  • Let life go on in it unhindered and let it defend itself, it will do more than if you paralyze it by encumbering it with remedies.
  • "Tomorrow we shall have to deal with Kutuzov!" said Napoleon.
  • "What year did you enter the service?" he asked with that affectation of military bluntness and geniality with which he always addressed the soldiers.
  • The first shots had not yet ceased to reverberate before others rang out and yet more were heard mingling with and overtaking one another.
  • Napoleon with his suite rode up to the Shevardino Redoubt where he dismounted.
  • The sun, just bursting forth from behind a cloud that had concealed it, was shining, with rays still half broken by the clouds, over the roofs of the street opposite, on the dew- besprinkled dust of the road, on the walls of the houses, on the windows, the fence, and on Pierre's horses standing before the hut.
  • Telling the groom to follow him with the horses, Pierre went down the street to the knoll from which he had looked at the field of battle the day before.
  • A crowd of military men was assembled there, members of the staff could be heard conversing in French, and Kutuzov's gray head in a white cap with a red band was visible, his gray nape sunk between his shoulders.
  • Nearer at hand glittered golden cornfields interspersed with copses.
  • The smoke of the guns mingled with this mist, and over the whole expanse and through that mist the rays of the morning sun were reflected, flashing back like lightning from the water, from the dew, and from the bayonets of the troops crowded together by the riverbanks and in Borodino.
  • Pierre wished to be there with that smoke, those shining bayonets, that movement, and those sounds.
  • He turned to look at Kutuzov and his suite, to compare his impressions with those of others.
  • They were all looking at the field of battle as he was, and, as it seemed to him, with the same feelings.
  • All their faces were now shining with that latent warmth of feeling Pierre had noticed the day before and had fully understood after his talk with Prince Andrew.
  • Go, my dear fellow, go... and Christ be with you!
  • He tried to pass either in front of them or to the right or left, but there were soldiers everywhere, all with the same preoccupied expression and busy with some unseen but evidently important task.
  • They all gazed with the same dissatisfied and inquiring expression at this stout man in a white hat, who for some unknown reason threatened to trample them under his horse's hoofs.
  • Another prodded his horse with the butt end of a musket, and Pierre, bending over his saddlebow and hardly able to control his shying horse, galloped ahead of the soldiers where there was a free space.
  • He looked about him with a smile which did not leave his face.
  • May I come with you? he asked.
  • "Why have you come here, Count?" he asked with a smile.
  • "Here it's tolerable," said he, "but with Bagration on the left flank they're getting it frightfully hot."
  • Come along with me to our knoll.
  • "Yes, I'll come with you," replied Pierre, looking round for his groom.
  • On that very meadow he had ridden over the day before, a soldier was lying athwart the rows of scented hay, with his head thrown awkwardly back and his shako off.
  • Pierre did not find his groom and rode along the hollow with the adjutant to Raevski's Redoubt.
  • There it was cool and quiet, with a scent of autumn.
  • The adjutant looked at Pierre as if puzzled what to do with him now.
  • In line with the knoll on both sides stood other guns which also fired incessantly.
  • Having reached the knoll, Pierre sat down at one end of a trench surrounding the battery and gazed at what was going on around him with an unconsciously happy smile.
  • Occasionally he rose and walked about the battery still with that same smile, trying not to obstruct the soldiers who were loading, hauling the guns, and continually running past him with bags and charges.
  • The guns of that battery were being fired continually one after another with a deafening roar, enveloping the whole neighborhood in powder smoke.
  • In contrast with the dread felt by the infantrymen placed in support, here in the battery where a small number of men busy at their work were separated from the rest by a trench, everyone experienced a common and as it were family feeling of animation.
  • The soldiers looked askance at him with surprise and even alarm as they went past him.
  • A shell tore up the earth two paces from Pierre and he looked around with a smile as he brushed from his clothes some earth it had thrown up.
  • Several of the men, with bright kindly faces, stopped beside Pierre.
  • To the infantry! added another with loud laughter, seeing the shell fly past and fall into the ranks of the supports.
  • And the sergeant, taking one of the men by the shoulders, gave him a shove with his knee.
  • The senior officer moved with big, rapid strides from one gun to another with a frowning face.
  • The young officer, with his face still more flushed, commanded the men more scrupulously than ever.
  • The soldiers handed up the charges, turned, loaded, and did their business with strained smartness.
  • "All with grapeshot!" shouted the officer.
  • Beside himself with terror Pierre jumped up and ran back to the battery, as to the only refuge from the horrors that surrounded him.
  • He saw the senior officer lying on the earth wall with his back turned as if he were examining something down below and that one of the soldiers he had noticed before was struggling forward shouting "Brothers!" and trying to free himself from some men who were holding him by the arm.
  • For some seconds they gazed with frightened eyes at one another's unfamiliar faces and both were perplexed at what they had done and what they were to do next.
  • Crowds of wounded- -some known to Pierre and some unknown--Russians and French, with faces distorted by suffering, walked, crawled, and were carried on stretchers from the battery.
  • The battle began on both sides with a cannonade from several hundred guns.
  • Then when the whole field was covered with smoke, two divisions, Campan's and Dessaix's, advanced from the French right, while Murat's troops advanced on Borodino from their left.
  • The sun had risen brightly and its slanting rays struck straight into Napoleon's face as, shading his eyes with his hand, he looked at the fleches.
  • Napoleon, standing on the knoll, looked through a field glass, and in its small circlet saw smoke and men, sometimes his own and sometimes Russians, but when he looked again with the naked eye, he could not tell where what he had seen was.
  • There for several hours amid incessant cannon and musketry fire, now Russians were seen alone, now Frenchmen alone, now infantry, and now cavalry: they appeared, fired, fell, collided, not knowing what to do with one another, screamed, and ran back again.
  • "Reinforcements?" said Napoleon in a tone of stern surprise, looking at the adjutant--a handsome lad with long black curls arranged like Murat's own--as though he did not understand his words.
  • The handsome boy adjutant with the long hair sighed deeply without removing his hand from his hat and galloped back to where men were being slaughtered.
  • Napoleon rose and having summoned Caulaincourt and Berthier began talking to them about matters unconnected with the battle.
  • In the midst of this conversation, which was beginning to interest Napoleon, Berthier's eyes turned to look at a general with a suite, who was galloping toward the knoll on a lathering horse.
  • Having dismounted he went up to the Emperor with rapid strides and in a loud voice began boldly demonstrating the necessity of sending reinforcements.
  • "Asks for reinforcements?" said Napoleon with an angry gesture.
  • He knew that it was a lost battle and that the least accident might now--with the fight balanced on such a strained center--destroy him and his army.
  • He sat silently on a campstool below the knoll, with head bowed and elbows on his knees.
  • When Scherbinin came galloping from the left flank with news that the French had captured the fleches and the village of Semenovsk, Kutuzov, guessing by the sounds of the battle and by Scherbinin's looks that the news was bad, rose as if to stretch his legs and, taking Scherbinin's arm, led him aside.
  • Kutuzov was chewing a piece of roast chicken with difficulty and glanced at Wolzogen with eyes that brightened under their puckering lids.
  • He treated his Serene Highness with a somewhat affected nonchalance intended to show that, as a highly trained military man, he left it to Russians to make an idol of this useless old man, but that he knew whom he was dealing with.
  • Wolzogen, noticing "the old gentleman's" agitation, said with a smile:
  • But the liveliest attention was attracted by occurrences quite apart from, and unconnected with, the battle.
  • Another time, general attention was attracted by a small brown dog, coming heaven knows whence, which trotted in a preoccupied manner in front of the ranks with tail stiffly erect till suddenly a shell fell close by, when it yelped, tucked its tail between its legs, and darted aside.
  • Prince Andrew, pale and gloomy like everyone in the regiment, paced up and down from the border of one patch to another, at the edge of the meadow beside an oatfield, with head bowed and arms behind his back.
  • He listened with weary ears to the ever-recurring sounds, distinguishing the whistle of flying projectiles from the booming of the reports, glanced at the tiresomely familiar faces of the men of the first battalion, and waited.
  • "Look out!" came a frightened cry from a soldier and, like a bird whirring in rapid flight and alighting on the ground, a shell dropped with little noise within two steps of Prince Andrew and close to the battalion commander's horse.
  • The militiamen with stretchers who were called up stood behind the officers.
  • Prince Andrew lay on his chest with his face in the grass, breathing heavily and noisily.
  • The dressing station consisted of three tents with flaps turned back, pitched at the edge of a birch wood.
  • Two steps from him, leaning against a branch and talking loudly and attracting general attention, stood a tall, handsome, black-haired noncommissioned officer with a bandaged head.
  • "We kicked him out from there so that he chucked everything, we grabbed the King himself!" cried he, looking around him with eyes that glittered with fever.
  • Like all the others near the speaker, Prince Andrew looked at him with shining eyes and experienced a sense of comfort.
  • Why was I so reluctant to part with life?
  • Yes, it was the same flesh, the same chair a canon, the sight of which had even then filled him with horror, as by a presentiment.
  • On the other table, round which many people were crowding, a tall well-fed man lay on his back with his head thrown back.
  • One large, white, plump leg twitched rapidly all the time with a feverish tremor.
  • When he had finished with the Tartar, whom they covered with an overcoat, the spectacled doctor came up to Prince Andrew, wiping his hands.
  • The doctors were busily engaged with the wounded man the shape of whose head seemed familiar to Prince Andrew: they were lifting him up and trying to quiet him.
  • The wounded man was shown his amputated leg stained with clotted blood and with the boot still on.
  • Yes, that man is somehow closely and painfully connected with me, thought Prince Andrew, not yet clearly grasping what he saw before him.
  • "What is the connection of that man with my childhood and life?" he asked himself without finding an answer.
  • He rode hurriedly from the battlefield and returned to the Shevardino knoll, where he sat on his campstool, his sallow face swollen and heavy, his eyes dim, his nose red, and his voice hoarse, involuntarily listening, with downcast eyes, to the sounds of firing.
  • With painful dejection he awaited the end of this action, in which he regarded himself as a participant and which he was unable to arrest.
  • At the dressing stations the grass and earth were soaked with blood for a space of some three acres around.
  • Crowds of men of various arms, wounded and unwounded, with frightened faces, dragged themselves back to Mozhaysk from the one army and back to Valuevo from the other.
  • Only when we have admitted the conception of the infinitely small, and the resulting geometrical progression with a common ratio of one tenth, and have found the sum of this progression to infinity, do we reach a solution of the problem.
  • A modern branch of mathematics having achieved the art of dealing with the infinitely small can now yield solutions in other more complex problems of motion which used to appear insoluble.
  • But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.
  • I see only a coincidence of occurrences such as happens with all the phenomena of life, and I see that however much and however carefully I observe the hands of the watch, and the valves and wheels of the engine, and the oak, I shall not discover the cause of the bells ringing, the engine moving, or of the winds of spring.
  • The activity of a commander-in-chief does not at all resemble the activity we imagine to ourselves when we sit at ease in our studies examining some campaign on the map, with a certain number of troops on this and that side in a certain known locality, and begin our plans from some given moment.
  • A commander-in-chief is never dealing with the beginning of any event--the position from which we always contemplate it.
  • Moment by moment the event is imperceptibly shaping itself, and at every moment of this continuous, uninterrupted shaping of events the commander-in-chief is in the midst of a most complex play of intrigues, worries, contingencies, authorities, projects, counsels, threats, and deceptions and is continually obliged to reply to innumerable questions addressed to him, which constantly conflict with one another.
  • The conversations all dealt with public questions.
  • After hearing what was being said by one or other of these groups he generally turned away with an air of disappointment, as though they were not speaking of anything he wished to hear.
  • (This Frenchman and one of the German princes serving with the Russian army were discussing the siege of Saragossa and considering the possibility of defending Moscow in a similar manner.)
  • Malasha looked down from the oven with shy delight at the faces, uniforms, and decorations of the generals, who one after another came into the room and sat down on the broad benches in the corner under the icons.
  • Beside him sat Uvarov, who with rapid gesticulations was giving him some information, speaking in low tones as they all did.
  • Chubby little Dokhturov was listening attentively with eyebrows raised and arms folded on his stomach.
  • His broad head with its bold features and glittering eyes was resting on his hand.
  • Raevski, twitching forward the black hair on his temples as was his habit, glanced now at Kutuzov and now at the door with a look of impatience.
  • Admitting the view of Barclay and others that a defensive battle at Fili was impossible, but imbued with Russian patriotism and the love of Moscow, he proposed to move troops from the right to the left flank during the night and attack the French right flank the following day.
  • Ermolov, Dokhturov, and Raevski agreed with Bennigsen.
  • Some of you will not agree with me.
  • When he had dismissed the generals Kutuzov sat a long time with his elbows on the table, thinking always of the same terrible question: When, when did the abandonment of Moscow become inevitable?
  • The same thing that took place in Moscow had happened in all the towns and villages on Russian soil beginning with Smolensk, without the participation of Count Rostopchin and his broadsheets.
  • They went away without thinking of the tremendous significance of that immense and wealthy city being given over to destruction, for a great city with wooden buildings was certain when abandoned by its inhabitants to be burned.
  • Helene, having returned with the court from Vilna to Petersburg, found herself in a difficult position.
  • In Vilna she had formed an intimacy with a young foreign prince.
  • Helene was faced by a new problem--how to preserve her intimacy with both without offending either.
  • I am not a man, that I should repay kindness with ingratitude!
  • The prince was surprised that so simple an idea had not occurred to him, and he applied for advice to the holy brethren of the Society of Jesus, with whom he was on intimate terms.
  • And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene--having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)-before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.
  • The abbe, a well-fed man with a plump, clean-shaven chin, a pleasant firm mouth, and white hands meekly folded on his knees, sat close to Helene and, with a subtle smile on his lips and a peaceful look of delight at her beauty, occasionally glanced at her face as he explained his opinion on the subject.
  • Helene with an uneasy smile looked at his curly hair and his plump, clean-shaven, blackish cheeks and every moment expected the conversation to take a fresh turn.
  • If now you married again with the object of bearing children, your sin might be forgiven.
  • The director of her conscience was astounded at having the case presented to him thus with the simplicity of Columbus' egg.
  • "Let us understand one another, Countess," said he with a smile, and began refuting his spiritual daughter's arguments.
  • It is done in all the brothels, and with these words Marya Dmitrievna, turning up her wide sleeves with her usual threatening gesture and glancing sternly round, moved across the room.
  • "Listen, Bilibin," said Helene (she always called friends of that sort by their surnames), and she touched his coat sleeve with her white, beringed fingers.
  • Bilibin wrinkled up the skin over his eyebrows and pondered, with a smile on his lips.
  • Armed with these arguments, which appeared to her unanswerable, she drove to her daughter's early one morning so as to find her alone.
  • Just then the lady companion who lived with Helene came in to announce that His Highness was in the ballroom and wished to see her.
  • "Comtesse, a tout peche misericorde," * said a fair-haired young man with a long face and nose, as he entered the room.
  • Toward the end of the battle of Borodino, Pierre, having run down from Raevski's battery a second time, made his way through a gully to Knyazkovo with a crowd of soldiers, reached the dressing station, and seeing blood and hearing cries and groans hurried on, still entangled in the crowds of soldiers.
  • The one thing he now desired with his whole soul was to get away quickly from the terrible sensations amid which he had lived that day and return to ordinary conditions of life and sleep quietly in a room in his own bed.
  • The pleasant odor of greasy viands mingled with the smell of smoke.
  • Well then, Peter Kirilych, come along with us, we'll take you there.
  • In the total darkness the soldiers walked with Pierre to Mozhaysk.
  • Pierre went on with the soldiers, quite forgetting that his inn was at the bottom of the hill and that he had already passed it.
  • "Good-bye!" he said and turned with his groom toward the inn.
  • Scarcely had Pierre laid his head on the pillow before he felt himself falling asleep, but suddenly, almost with the distinctness of reality, he heard the boom, boom, boom of firing, the thud of projectiles, groans and cries, and smelled blood and powder, and a feeling of horror and dread of death seized him.
  • Filled with fright he opened his eyes and lifted his head from under his cloak.
  • And they with their simple, kind, firm faces surrounded his benefactor on all sides.
  • He felt ashamed, and with one arm covered his legs from which his cloak had in fact slipped.
  • For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
  • Again he covered himself up with his cloak, but now neither the lodge nor his benefactor was there.
  • Yes, one must harness them, must harness them! he repeated to himself with inward rapture, feeling that these words and they alone expressed what he wanted to say and solved the question that tormented him.
  • Pierre turned away with repugnance, and closing his eyes quickly fell back on the carriage seat.
  • The groom, the coachman, and the innkeeper told Pierre that an officer had come with news that the French were already near Mozhaysk and that our men were leaving it.
  • There were wounded in the yards, at the windows of the houses, and the streets were crowded with them.
  • Pierre offered the use of his carriage, which had overtaken him, to a wounded general he knew, and drove with him to Moscow.
  • Though this news was being concealed from the inhabitants, the officials--the heads of the various government departments--knew that Moscow would soon be in the enemy's hands, just as Count Rostopchin himself knew it, and to escape personal responsibility they had all come to the governor to ask how they were to deal with their various departments.
  • In answer to questions with which he was greeted, the courier made a despairing gesture with his hand and passed through the room.
  • While waiting in the reception room Pierre with weary eyes watched the various officials, old and young, military and civilian, who were there.
  • His Serene Highness has passed through Mozhaysk in order to join up with the troops moving toward him and has taken up a strong position where the enemy will not soon attack him.
  • By the by, Count," he added suddenly, addressing Pierre with a smile, "we heard that you have family troubles and that the countess, your wife..."
  • "Well, they say," continued the adjutant with the same smile, "that the countess, your wife, is preparing to go abroad.
  • "And who is that?" he asked, indicating a short old man in a clean blue peasant overcoat, with a big snow-white beard and eyebrows and a ruddy face.
  • Perhaps you have heard of that affair with the proclamation.
  • The young man is in prison and I expect it will go hard with him.
  • His father keeps a cookshop here by the Stone Bridge, and you know there was a large icon of God Almighty painted with a scepter in one hand and an orb in the other.
  • Well, he took that icon home with him for a few days and what did he do?
  • When he entered the private room Count Rostopchin, puckering his face, was rubbing his forehead and eyes with his hand.
  • "Vereshchagin is a renegade and a traitor who will be punished as he deserves," said he with the vindictive heat with which people speak when recalling an insult.
  • I beg you to leave the town and break off all communication with such men as Klyucharev.
  • And I will knock the nonsense out of anybody"-- but probably realizing that he was shouting at Bezukhov who so far was not guilty of anything, he added, taking Pierre's hand in a friendly manner, "We are on the eve of a public disaster and I haven't time to be polite to everybody who has business with me.
  • They all had business with Pierre and wanted decisions from him.
  • A dozen persons who had business with Pierre were awaiting him in the drawing room.
  • After Petya had joined Obolenski's regiment of Cossacks and left for Belaya Tserkov where that regiment was forming, the countess was seized with terror.
  • The thought that both her sons were at the war, had both gone from under her wing, that today or tomorrow either or both of them might be killed like the three sons of one of her acquaintances, struck her that summer for the first time with cruel clearness.
  • Nicholas was somewhere with the army and had not sent a word since his last letter, in which he had given a detailed account of his meeting with Princess Mary.
  • What do I want with them?
  • The passionate tenderness with which his mother received him did not please the sixteen-year-old officer.
  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.
  • The countess watched the things being packed, was dissatisfied with everything, was constantly in pursuit of Petya who was always running away from her, and was jealous of Natasha with whom he spent all his time.
  • Almost all day long the house resounded with their running feet, their cries, and their spontaneous laughter.
  • The yard was crowded with peasant carts, some loaded high and already corded up, others still empty.
  • The voices and footsteps of the many servants and of the peasants who had come with the carts resounded as they shouted to one another in the yard and in the house.
  • Petya was not at home, he had gone to visit a friend with whom he meant to obtain a transfer from the militia to the active army.
  • The former housekeeper, old Mavra Kuzminichna, had stepped out of the crowd by the gate, gone up to a cart with a hood constructed of bast mats, and was speaking to a pale young officer who lay inside.
  • Natasha glanced with frightened eyes at the face of the wounded officer and at once went to meet the major.
  • The major raised his hand to his cap with a smile.
  • With a slight inclination of her head, Natasha stepped back quickly to Mavra Kuzminichna, who stood talking compassionately to the officer.
  • The cart in which the officer lay was turned into the Rostovs' yard, and dozens of carts with wounded men began at the invitation of the townsfolk to turn into the yards and to draw up at the entrances of the houses in Povarskaya Street.
  • Natasha was evidently pleased to be dealing with new people outside the ordinary routine of her life.
  • In the hall she met her father, who had returned with bad news.
  • "We've stayed too long!" said the count with involuntary vexation.
  • The countess looked with timid horror at her son's eager, excited face as he said this.
  • With a woman's involuntary loving cunning she, who till then had not shown any alarm, said that she would die of fright if they did not leave that very night.
  • When Natasha set to work two cases were standing open in the ballroom, one almost full up with crockery, the other with carpets.
  • "I won't!" cried Natasha, with one hand holding back the hair that hung over her perspiring face, while with the other she pressed down the carpets.
  • He was being conveyed in a caleche with a raised hood, and was quite covered by an apron.
  • "Well, perhaps," said he with a sigh.
  • An enormous crowd of factory hands, house serfs, and peasants, with whom some officials, seminarists, and gentry were mingled, had gone early that morning to the Three Hills.
  • The major-domo stood at the porch talking to an elderly orderly and to a pale young officer with a bandaged arm.
  • I have nothing here with me....
  • The count went into the house with him, repeating his order not to refuse the wounded who asked for a lift.
  • Berg drove up to his father-in-law's house in his spruce little trap with a pair of sleek roans, exactly like those of a certain prince.
  • From the anteroom Berg ran with smooth though impatient steps into the drawing room, where he embraced the count, kissed the hands of Natasha and Sonya, and hastened to inquire after "Mamma's" health.
  • The army is burning with a spirit of heroism and the leaders, so to say, have now assembled in council.
  • Natasha watched him with an intent gaze that confused him, as if she were trying to find in his face the answer to some question.
  • "Altogether such heroism as was displayed by the Russian warriors cannot be imagined or adequately praised!" said Berg, glancing round at Natasha, and as if anxious to conciliate her, replying to her intent look with a smile.
  • Just then the countess came in from the sitting room with a weary and dissatisfied expression.
  • Natasha left the room with her father and, as if finding it difficult to reach some decision, first followed him and then ran downstairs.
  • Her throat quivered with convulsive sobs and, afraid of weakening and letting the force of her anger run to waste, she turned and rushed headlong up the stairs.
  • Berg was sitting beside the countess consoling her with the respectful attention of a relative.
  • The count, pipe in hand, was pacing up and down the room, when Natasha, her face distorted by anger, burst in like a tempest and approached her mother with rapid steps.
  • When they understood that order the servants set to work at this new task with pleasure and zeal.
  • The wounded dragged themselves out of their rooms and stood with pale but happy faces round the carts.
  • Dunyasha can go with me in the carriage.
  • She was putting away the things that had to be left behind and making a list of them as the countess wished, and she tried to get as much taken away with them as possible.
  • Before two o'clock in the afternoon the Rostovs' four carriages, packed full and with the horses harnessed, stood at the front door.
  • One by one the carts with the wounded had moved out of the yard.
  • With the help of a maid she was arranging a seat for the countess in the huge high coach that stood at the entrance.
  • The wounded prince: he spent the night in our house and is going with us.
  • They say he is dying, replied the maid with a sigh.
  • He is going with us.
  • "Natasha does not know yet, but he is going with us," said Sonya.
  • What's the matter? asked Natasha, as with animated face she ran into the room.
  • What is it? persisted Natasha with her quick intuition.
  • The count was the first to rise, and with a loud sigh crossed himself before the icon.
  • Then the count embraced Mavra Kuzminichna and Vasilich, who were to remain in Moscow, and while they caught at his hand and kissed his shoulder he patted their backs lightly with some vaguely affectionate and comforting words.
  • (The most precious ones, with which some family tradition was connected, were being taken with them.)
  • In the porch and in the yard the men whom Petya had armed with swords and daggers, with trousers tucked inside their high boots and with belts and girdles tightened, were taking leave of those remaining behind.
  • And Dunyasha, with clenched teeth, without replying but with an aggrieved look on her face, hastily got into the coach to rearrange the seat.
  • Yes, it really is Bezukhov in a coachman's coat, with a queer-looking old boy.
  • In fact, however, though now much farther off than before, the Rostovs all saw Pierre--or someone extraordinarily like him--in a coachman's coat, going down the street with head bent and a serious face beside a small, beardless old man who looked like a footman.
  • Natasha's face, leaning out of the window, beamed with quizzical kindliness.
  • I'd certainly stay with you.
  • But what is the matter with you, Count?
  • Natasha continued to lean out of the window for a long time, beaming at him with her kindly, slightly quizzical, happy smile.
  • When he woke up on the morning after his return to Moscow and his interview with Count Rostopchin, he could not for some time make out where he was and what was expected of him.
  • He went along the whole length of this passage to the stairs and, frowning and rubbing his forehead with both hands, went down as far as the first landing.
  • Gerasim, that sallow beardless old man Pierre had seen at Torzhok five years before with Joseph Bazdeev, came out in answer to his knock.
  • Owing to the present state of things Sophia Danilovna has gone to the Torzhok estate with the children, your excellency.
  • A tall, bald-headed old man with a red nose, wearing a dressing gown and with galoshes on his bare feet, stood in the anteroom.
  • Pierre went into that gloomy study which he had entered with such trepidation in his benefactor's lifetime.
  • "Look here," he added, taking Gerasim by a button of his coat and looking down at the old man with moist, shining, and ecstatic eyes, "I say, do you know that there is going to be a battle tomorrow?"
  • But as soon as Pierre turned toward him he wrapped his dressing gown around him with a shamefaced and angry look and hurried away.
  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
  • Moscow seen from the Poklonny Hill lay spaciously spread out with her river, her gardens, and her churches, and she seemed to be living her usual life, her cupolas glittering like stars in the sunlight.
  • This city was evidently living with the full force of its own life.
  • From the height of the Kremlin--yes, there is the Kremlin, yes--I will give them just laws; I will teach them the meaning of true civilization, I will make generations of boyars remember their conqueror with love.
  • A general with a brilliant suite galloped off at once to fetch the boyars.
  • Those sent to fetch the deputation had returned with the news that Moscow was empty, that everyone had left it.
  • Faster and faster, vying with one another, they moved at the double or at a trot, vanishing amid the clouds of dust they raised and making the air ring with a deafening roar of mingling shouts.
  • There are no longer sentinels sounding the alarm with their abdomens raised, and ready to die in defense of the hive.
  • In and out of the hive long black robber bees smeared with honey fly timidly and shiftily.
  • Formerly only bees laden with honey flew into the hive, and they flew out empty; now they fly out laden.
  • Here and there a couple of bees, by force of habit and custom cleaning out the brood cells, with efforts beyond their strength laboriously drag away a dead bee or bumblebee without knowing why they do it.
  • In another corner two old bees are languidly fighting, or cleaning themselves, or feeding one another, without themselves knowing whether they do it with friendly or hostile intent.
  • When with due circumspection Napoleon was informed that Moscow was empty, he looked angrily at his informant, turned away, and silently continued to walk to and fro.
  • The Russian troops were passing through Moscow from two o'clock at night till two in the afternoon and bore away with them the wounded and the last of the inhabitants who were leaving.
  • But there were no dealers with voices of ingratiating affability inviting customers to enter; there were no hawkers, nor the usual motley crowd of female purchasers--but only soldiers, in uniforms and overcoats though without muskets, entering the Bazaar empty-handed and silently making their way out through its passages with bundles.
  • They unlocked their shops and locked them up again, and themselves carried goods away with the help of their assistants.
  • Among the soldiers in the shops and passages some men were to be seen in gray coats, with closely shaven heads.
  • Two officers, one with a scarf over his uniform and mounted on a lean, dark-gray horse, the other in an overcoat and on foot, stood at the corner of Ilyinka Street, talking.
  • The officer in the scarf dismounted, called up a drummer, and went with him into the arcade.
  • A shopkeeper with red pimples on his cheeks near the nose, and a calm, persistent, calculating expression on his plump face, hurriedly and ostentatiously approached the officer, swinging his arms.
  • I'll fetch a piece of cloth at once for such an honorable gentleman, or even two pieces with pleasure.
  • From one open shop came the sound of blows and vituperation, and just as the officer came up to it a man in a gray coat with a shaven head was flung out violently.
  • Four borzois with collars were pressing close to the wheels.
  • The cart was loaded high, and at the very top, beside a child's chair with its legs in the air, sat a peasant woman uttering piercing and desperate shrieks.
  • The huge courtyard of the Rostovs' house was littered with wisps of hay and with dung from the horses, and not a soul was to be seen there.
  • They were the yard porter Ignat, and the page boy Mishka, Vasilich's grandson who had stayed in Moscow with his grandfather.
  • Mishka had opened the clavichord and was strumming on it with one finger.
  • The yard porter, his arms akimbo, stood smiling with satisfaction before the large mirror.
  • "Isn't it fine, eh, Uncle Ignat?" said the boy, suddenly beginning to strike the keyboard with both hands.
  • Ignat left off smiling, adjusted his belt, and went out of the room with meekly downcast eyes.
  • Mavra Kuzminichna flicked the dust off the clavichord and closed it, and with a deep sigh left the drawing room and locked its main door.
  • Mavra Kuzminichna opened the gate and an officer of eighteen, with the round face of a Rostov, entered the yard.
  • As you see" (he glanced with an amused air and good-natured smile at his coat and boots) "my things are worn out and I have no money, so I was going to ask the count..."
  • While Mavra Kuzminichna was running to her room the officer walked about the yard gazing at his worn-out boots with lowered head and a faint smile on his lips.
  • Christ be with you, sir!
  • Tipsy and perspiring, with dim eyes and wide-open mouths, they were all laboriously singing some song or other.
  • They were singing discordantly, arduously, and with great effort, evidently not because they wished to sing, but because they wanted to show they were drunk and on a spree.
  • The sleeve of his coat kept slipping down and he always carefully rolled it up again with his left hand, as if it were most important that the sinewy white arm he was flourishing should be bare.
  • Another smith tried to enter the doorway, pressing against the publican with his chest.
  • The lad with the turned-up sleeve gave the smith a blow in the face and cried wildly: "They're fighting us, lads!"
  • At the corner of the Moroseyka, opposite a large house with closed shutters and bearing a bootmaker's signboard, stood a score of thin, worn-out, gloomy-faced bootmakers, wearing overalls and long tattered coats.
  • "He should pay folks off properly," a thin workingman, with frowning brows and a straggly beard, was saying.
  • On seeing the crowd and the bloodstained man the workman ceased speaking, and with eager curiosity all the bootmakers joined the moving crowd.
  • The superintendent of police, who had gone that morning by Count Rostopchin's orders to burn the barges and had in connection with that matter acquired a large sum of money which was at that moment in his pocket, on seeing a crowd bearing down upon him told his coachman to stop.
  • "Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."
  • The superintendent of police turned round at that moment with a scared look, said something to his coachman, and his horses increased their speed.
  • He unexpectedly felt himself ridiculous, weak, and alone, with no ground to stand on.
  • The count ordered his carriage that he might drive to Sokolniki, and sat in his study with folded hands, morose, sallow, and taciturn.
  • While the sea of history remains calm the ruler-administrator in his frail bark, holding on with a boat hook to the ship of the people and himself moving, naturally imagines that his efforts move the ship he is holding on to.
  • The ship moves independently with its own enormous motion, the boat hook no longer reaches the moving vessel, and suddenly the administrator, instead of appearing a ruler and a source of power, becomes an insignificant, useless, feeble man.
  • The tall lad was standing in front, flourishing his arm and saying something with a stern look.
  • The blood- stained smith stood beside him with a gloomy face.
  • This is what they have done with Russia!
  • This is what they have done with me! thought he, full of an irrepressible fury that welled up within him against the someone to whom what was happening might be attributed.
  • As often happens with passionate people, he was mastered by anger but was still seeking an object on which to vent it.
  • I'll come out to you in a moment, but we must first settle with the villain.
  • He'll settle with all the villains, you'll see!
  • Rostopchin, coming out there with quick angry steps, looked hastily around as if seeking someone.
  • The young man in his clattering chains stepped clumsily to the spot indicated, holding away with one finger the coat collar which chafed his neck, turned his long neck twice this way and that, sighed, and submissively folded before him his thin hands, unused to work.
  • While waiting for the young man to take his place on the step Rostopchin stood frowning and rubbing his face with his hand.
  • "Lads!" said he, with a metallic ring in his voice.
  • Deal with him as you think fit!
  • Those standing in front, who had seen and heard what had taken place before them, all stood with wide-open eyes and mouths, straining with all their strength, and held back the crowd that was pushing behind them.
  • The tall youth, with a stony look on his face, and rigid and uplifted arm, stood beside Vereshchagin.
  • And one of the soldiers, his face all at once distorted with fury, struck Vereshchagin on the head with the blunt side of his saber.
  • "Ah!" cried Vereshchagin in meek surprise, looking round with a frightened glance as if not understanding why this was done to him.
  • Vereshchagin with a cry of horror, covering his head with his hands, rushed toward the crowd.
  • The tall youth, against whom he stumbled, seized his thin neck with his hands and, yelling wildly, fell with him under the feet of the pressing, struggling crowd.
  • Hit him with an ax, eh!...
  • Aren't they afraid of sinning?... said the same mob now, looking with pained distress at the dead body with its long, thin, half-severed neck and its livid face stained with blood and dust.
  • The gory, dust-stained, half-shaven head with its long neck trailed twisting along the ground.
  • At the moment when Vereshchagin fell and the crowd closed in with savage yells and swayed about him, Rostopchin suddenly turned pale and, instead of going to the back entrance where his carriage awaited him, went with hurried steps and bent head, not knowing where and why, along the passage leading to the rooms on the ground floor.
  • He remembered with dissatisfaction the agitation and fear he had betrayed before his subordinates.
  • Since the world began and men have killed one another no one has ever committed such a crime against his fellow man without comforting himself with this same idea.
  • I could not let him go unpunished and so I have killed two birds with one stone: to appease the mob I gave them a victim and at the same time punished a miscreant.
  • Half an hour later he was driving with his fast horses across the Sokolniki field, no longer thinking of what had occurred but considering what was to come.
  • The lunatic's solemn, gloomy face was thin and yellow, with its beard growing in uneven tufts.
  • His black, agate pupils with saffron- yellow whites moved restlessly near the lower eyelids.
  • Pull up, I tell you! he cried in a piercing voice, and again shouted something breathlessly with emphatic intonations and gestures.
  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
  • Kutuzov, dejected and frowning, sat on a bench by the bridge toying with his whip in the sand when a caleche dashed up noisily.
  • A man in a general's uniform with plumes in his hat went up to Kutuzov and said something in French.
  • And strange to say, the Governor of Moscow, the proud Count Rostopchin, took up a Cossack whip and went to the bridge where he began with shouts to drive on the carts that blocked the way.
  • A general who was standing by the guns shouted some words of command to the officer, and the latter ran back again with his men.
  • Together with that sound came a solitary human cry from the gateway and amid the smoke appeared the figure of a bareheaded man in a peasant's coat.
  • In cellars and storerooms similar men were busy among the provisions, and in the yards unlocking or breaking open coach house and stable doors, lighting fires in kitchens and kneading and baking bread with rolled-up sleeves, and cooking; or frightening, amusing, or caressing women and children.
  • But despite all these measures the men, who had till then constituted an army, flowed all over the wealthy, deserted city with its comforts and plentiful supplies.
  • Many of them appropriated several houses, chalked their names on them, and quarreled and even fought with other companies for them.
  • Moscow when occupied by the enemy did not remain intact like Berlin, Vienna, and other towns, simply because its inhabitants abandoned it and did not welcome the French with bread and salt, nor bring them the keys of the city.
  • And with that object he had asked Gerasim to get him a peasant's coat and a pistol, confiding to him his intentions of remaining in Joseph Alexeevich's house and keeping his name secret.
  • Then during the first day spent in inaction and solitude (he tried several times to fix his attention on the masonic manuscripts, but was unable to do so) the idea that had previously occurred to him of the cabalistic significance of his name in connection with Bonaparte's more than once vaguely presented itself.
  • When, having bought the coat merely with the object of taking part among the people in the defense of Moscow, Pierre had met the Rostovs and Natasha had said to him: Are you remaining in Moscow?...
  • Next day, with the sole idea of not sparing himself and not lagging in any way behind them, Pierre went to the Three Hills gate.
  • Pierre had first experienced this strange and fascinating feeling at the Sloboda Palace, when he had suddenly felt that wealth, power, and life--all that men so painstakingly acquire and guard--if it has any worth has so only by reason of the joy with which it can all be renounced.
  • In his fancy he did not clearly picture to himself either the striking of the blow or the death of Napoleon, but with extraordinary vividness and melancholy enjoyment imagined his own destruction and heroic endurance.
  • "Well then, take me and execute me!" he went on, speaking to himself and bowing his head with a sad but firm expression.
  • He paused and then suddenly seeing the pistol on the table seized it with unexpected rapidity and ran out into the corridor.
  • Pierre, coming out into the corridor, looked with pity and repulsion at the half-crazy old man.
  • Makar Alexeevich, frowning with exertion, held on to the pistol and screamed hoarsely, evidently with some heroic fancy in his head.
  • The vestibule was filled with the discordant sounds of a struggle and of a tipsy, hoarse voice.
  • One was an officer--a tall, soldierly, handsome man--the other evidently a private or an orderly, sunburned, short, and thin, with sunken cheeks and a dull expression.
  • Having done that, the officer, lifting his elbow with a smart gesture, stroked his mustache and lightly touched his hat.
  • Gerasim gazed at the officer with an alarmed and inquiring look.
  • With a madman's cunning, Makar Alexeevich eyed the Frenchman, raised his pistol, and took aim.
  • Makar Alexeevich was standing with parted lips, swaying, as if about to fall asleep, as he leaned against the wall.
  • "We French are merciful after victory, but we do not pardon traitors," he added, with a look of gloomy dignity and a fine energetic gesture.
  • The Frenchman listened in silence with the same gloomy expression, but suddenly turned to Pierre with a smile.
  • Well, and what are we to do with this man? he added, addressing himself to Pierre as to a brother.
  • The Frenchman expanded his chest and made a majestic gesture with his arm.
  • Lead that man away! said he quickly and energetically, and taking the arm of Pierre whom he had promoted to be a Frenchman for saving his life, he went with him into the room.
  • When the French officer went into the room with Pierre the latter again thought it his duty to assure him that he was not French and wished to go away, but the officer would not hear of it.
  • He was so very polite, amiable, good-natured, and genuinely grateful to Pierre for saving his life that Pierre had not the heart to refuse, and sat down with him in the parlor--the first room they entered.
  • Will you now be so good as to tell me with whom I have the honor of conversing so pleasantly, instead of being in the ambulance with that maniac's bullet in my body?
  • You belong to the gentry? he concluded with a shade of inquiry in his tone.
  • His face grew red and was covered with perspiration.
  • Pierre was hungry and shared the dinner with pleasure.
  • Terrible in battle... gallant... with the fair" (he winked and smiled), "that's what the French are, Monsieur Pierre, aren't they?"
  • The captain was so naively and good-humoredly gay, so real, and so pleased with himself that Pierre almost winked back as he looked merrily at him.
  • He had a habit of stopping short in the middle of his talk and gazing intently with his laughing, kindly eyes.
  • I could not resist the sight of the grandeur and glory with which he has covered France.
  • Pierre stammered with a guilty look.
  • When he returned to the room Pierre was sitting in the same place as before, with his head in his hands.
  • The few glasses of wine he had drunk and the conversation with this good-natured man had destroyed the mood of concentrated gloom in which he had spent the last few days and which was essential for the execution of his design.
  • The tune he was whistling, his gait, and the gesture with which he twirled his mustache, all now seemed offensive.
  • "Onterkoff," said the captain and looked at Pierre for some seconds with laughing eyes.
  • Ramballe, with genuine distress and sympathy in his face, went up to Pierre and bent over him.
  • I say it with my hand on my heart! said he, striking his chest.
  • And with a Frenchman's easy and naive frankness the captain told Pierre the story of his ancestors, his childhood, youth, and manhood, and all about his relations and his financial and family affairs, "ma pauvre mere" playing of course an important part in the story.
  • "Oh, women, women!" and the captain, looking with glistening eyes at Pierre, began talking of love and of his love affairs.
  • Finally, the latest episode in Poland still fresh in the captain's memory, and which he narrated with rapid gestures and glowing face, was of how he had saved the life of a Pole (in general, the saving of life continually occurred in the captain's stories) and the Pole had entrusted to him his enchanting wife (parisienne de coeur) while himself entering the French service.
  • While listening to these love stories his own love for Natasha unexpectedly rose to his mind, and going over the pictures of that love in his imagination he mentally compared them with Ramballe's tales.
  • Listening to the story of the struggle between love and duty, Pierre saw before his eyes every minutest detail of his last meeting with the object of his love at the Sukharev water tower.
  • Speaking thickly and with a faraway look in his shining eyes, he told the whole story of his life: his marriage, Natasha's love for his best friend, her betrayal of him, and all his own simple relations with her.
  • To the right and high up in the sky was the sickle of the waning moon and opposite to it hung that bright comet which was connected in Pierre's heart with his love.
  • Without taking leave of his new friend, Pierre left the gate with unsteady steps and returning to his room lay down on the sofa and immediately fell asleep.
  • The glow of the first fire that began on the second of September was watched from the various roads by the fugitive Muscovites and by the retreating troops, with many different feelings.
  • At ten o'clock that evening the Rostov family and the wounded traveling with them were all distributed in the yards and huts of that large village.
  • In a neighboring hut lay Raevski's adjutant with a fractured wrist.
  • Sonya and Madame Schoss, who had not yet undressed, went out with him.
  • Petya was no longer with the family, he had gone on with his regiment which was making for Troitsa.
  • Natasha, pale, with a fixed look, was sitting on the bench under the icons just where she had sat down on arriving and paid no attention to her father's words.
  • The countess went up to her daughter and touched her head with the back of her hand as she was wont to do when Natasha was ill, then touched her forehead with her lips as if to feel whether she was feverish, and finally kissed her.
  • The countess exchanged a look with Sonya.
  • Natasha rose slowly and carefully, crossed herself, and stepped cautiously on the cold and dirty floor with her slim, supple, bare feet.
  • It seemed to her that something heavy was beating rhythmically against all the walls of the room: it was her own heart, sinking with alarm and terror and overflowing with love.
  • With her bare feet she touched a sleeping man, stepped over him, and opened the door into the part of the hut where Prince Andrew lay.
  • But now that the moment had come she was filled with dread of what she might see.
  • She passed the valet, the snuff fell from the candle wick, and she saw Prince Andrew clearly with his arms outside the quilt, and such as she had always seen him.
  • She went up to him and with a swift, flexible, youthful movement dropped on her knees.
  • When he had been placed on his camp bed he lay for a long time motionless with closed eyes.
  • He was dissatisfied because he knew by experience that if his patient did not die now, he would do so a little later with greater suffering.
  • He drank it eagerly, looking with feverish eyes at the door in front of him as if trying to understand and remember something.
  • The doctor and valet lifted the cloak with which he was covered and, making wry faces at the noisome smell of mortifying flesh that came from the wound, began examining that dreadful place.
  • The first time Prince Andrew understood where he was and what was the matter with him and remembered being wounded and how was when he asked to be carried into the hut after his caleche had stopped at Mytishchi.
  • He remembered that he had now a new source of happiness and that this happiness had something to do with the Gospels.
  • "Yes, a new happiness was revealed to me of which man cannot be deprived," he thought as he lay in the semidarkness of the quiet hut, gazing fixedly before him with feverish wide open eyes.
  • And suddenly thoughts and feelings again swam to the surface of his mind with peculiar clearness and force.
  • It is possible to love someone dear to you with human love, but an enemy can only be loved by divine love.
  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.
  • In that world some structure was still being erected and did not fall, something was still stretching out, and the candle with its red halo was still burning, and the same shirtlike sphinx lay near the door; but besides all this something creaked, there was a whiff of fresh air, and a new white sphinx appeared, standing at the door.
  • But the face remained before him with the force of reality and drew nearer.
  • Natasha, motionless on her knees (she was unable to stir), with frightened eyes riveted on him, was restraining her sobs.
  • Prince Andrew sighed with relief, smiled, and held out his hand.
  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.
  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.
  • "Forgive me for what I ha-ve do-ne!" faltered Natasha in a scarcely audible, broken whisper, and began kissing his hand more rapidly, just touching it with her lips.
  • "I love you more, better than before," said Prince Andrew, lifting her face with his hand so as to look into her eyes.
  • Those eyes, filled with happy tears, gazed at him timidly, compassionately, and with joyous love.
  • Natasha's thin pale face, with its swollen lips, was more than plain--it was dreadful.
  • Though with the intimacy now established between the wounded man and Natasha the thought occurred that should he recover their former engagement would be renewed, no one--least of all Natasha and Prince Andrew--spoke of this: the unsettled question of life and death, which hung not only over Bolkonski but over all Russia, shut out all other considerations.
  • That something shameful was his yesterday's conversation with Captain Ramballe.
  • Pierre rose, rubbed his eyes, and seeing the pistol with an engraved stock which Gerasim had replaced on the writing table, he remembered where he was and what lay before him that very day.
  • The conflagration, at which he had looked with so much indifference the evening before, had greatly increased during the night.
  • Now and then he met Russians with anxious and timid faces, and Frenchmen with an air not of the city but of the camp, walking in the middle of the streets.
  • Both the Russians and the French looked at Pierre with surprise.
  • The French followed him with astonishment in their eyes chiefly because Pierre, unlike all the other Russians who gazed at the French with fear and curiosity, paid no attention to them.
  • On the ground, beside the trunks, sat a thin woman no longer young, with long, prominent upper teeth, and wearing a black cloak and cap.
  • This woman, swaying to and fro and muttering something, was choking with sobs.
  • Two girls of about ten and twelve, dressed in dirty short frocks and cloaks, were staring at their mother with a look of stupefaction on their pale frightened faces.
  • The woman's husband, a short, round- shouldered man in the undress uniform of a civilian official, with sausage-shaped whiskers and showing under his square-set cap the hair smoothly brushed forward over his temples, with expressionless face was moving the trunks, which were placed one on another, and was dragging some garments from under them.
  • He held his head higher, his eyes shone with the light of life, and with swift steps he followed the maid, overtook her, and came out on the Povarskoy.
  • Pierre turned back, giving a spring now and then to keep up with her.
  • And a minute or two later the Frenchman, a black-eyed fellow with a spot on his cheek, in shirt sleeves, really did jump out of a window on the ground floor, and clapping Pierre on the shoulder ran with him into the garden.
  • We must be human, we are all mortal you know! and the Frenchman with the spot on his cheek ran back to his comrades.
  • She screamed desperately and angrily and tried with her little hands to pull Pierre's hands away and to bite them with her slobbering mouth.
  • But he made an effort not to throw the child down and ran with her to the large house.
  • It was now, however, impossible to get back the way he had come; the maid, Aniska, was no longer there, and Pierre with a feeling of pity and disgust pressed the wet, painfully sobbing child to himself as tenderly as he could and ran with her through the garden seeking another way out.
  • Having run through different yards and side streets, Pierre got back with his little burden to the Gruzinski garden at the corner of the Povarskoy.
  • Glowing with the heat and from running, he felt at that moment more strongly than ever the sense of youth, animation, and determination that had come on him when he ran to save the child.
  • She had now become quiet and, clinging with her little hands to Pierre's coat, sat on his arm gazing about her like some little wild animal.
  • He glanced at her occasionally with a slight smile.