Yarrell sentence example

yarrell
  • Yarrell, " Observations on the tracheae of Birds," Trans.
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  • The year 1837 saw the beginning of two remarkable works by Macgillivray and Yarrell respectively, and each entitled A History of British Birds.
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  • Of Yarrell's work in three volumes, a second edition was published in 1845, a third in 1856, and a fourth, begun in 1871, and almost wholly rewritten.
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  • Yarrell in 1829, and published with elaborate figures in its Transactions (xvi.
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  • Yarrell states that formerly the Thames alone supplied from i,000,000 to 1,200,000 lamperns annually, but their number has so much fallen off that, for instance, in 1876 only 40,000 were sold to the codfishers.
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  • cit., p. 80) William Yarrell communicated to that body a complete description of it, which was afterwards published in full with an excellent portrait (Trans.
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  • Short to the effect that he had seen two living, and that all Yarrell had said was substantially correct, except underrating its progressive powers.
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  • It has pushed its way towards the north, and has even been several times taken in England (Yarrell's Brit.
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  • Hist., p. 116, London, 1799), but only partially, and it was Yarrell who, in 1829 (Zool.
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  • str.) Yarrell and Dolichorhynchus Willey.
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  • - Amphioxus lanceolatus, Yarrell (Branchiostoma lubricum, Coste).
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  • Lankester, "Contributions to the Knowledge of Amphioxus lanceolatus (Yarrell)," op. cit., xxix.
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  • Yarrell proved conclusively that Donovan's opinion was founded upon an error; unfortunately he contented himself with comparing whitebait with the shad only, and in the end adopted the opinion of the Thames fishermen, whose interest it was to represent it as a distinct adult form; thus the whitebait is introduced into Yarrell's History of British Fishes (1836) as Clupea alba.
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  • The Pine-grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator) inhabits the coniferzone of both the Old and the New Worlds, seeking, in Europe and probably elsewhere, a lower latitude as winter approaches - often journeying in large flocks; stragglers have occasionally reached the British Islands (Yarrell, Br.
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