Wedderburn sentence example

wedderburn
  • JAMES WEDDERBURN (1495?-1533), John (1500-1556) and Robert (1510?
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  • - ?1556), Scottish poets and religious re - formers, were natives of Dundee, where their father James Wedderburn was a prosperous merchant.
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  • James Wedderburn, who had gone to St Andrews in 1514, was for a time in France prepar - ing for a mercantile career.
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  • John Wedderburn graduated M.A.
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  • and the known leanings of the regent, the earl of Arran, to reform, encouraged many exiles, Wedderburn among them, to revisit Scotland.
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  • Robert Wedderburn, who graduated M.A.
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  • The earliest known edition of the Compendious Book of Psalms and Spiritual Songs (of which an unique copy is extant) dates back to 1567, though the contents were probably published in broad sheets during John Wedderburn's lifetime.
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  • "Vedderburn's" Complainte of Scotlande (1549) has been variously assigned to Robert Wedderburn, to Sir David Lyndsay and to Sir James Inglis, who was chaplain of the Abbey of Cambuskenneth from about 1508 to 1550.
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  • There are strong arguments against Robert Wedderburn's authorship, as maintained by Laing and others.
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  • Murray inclines to assign it to Sir James Inglis, or an unknown priest of the name of Wedderburn.
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  • The petition was refused and was condemned as scandalous, and Franklin, who took upon himself the responsibility for the publication of the letters, in the hearing before the privy council at the Cockpit on the 29th of January 1 774 was insulted and was called a thief by Alexander Wedderburn (the solicitor-general, who appeared for Hutchinson and Oliver), and was removed from his position as head of the post office in the American colonies.
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  • Wedderburn, is the greatest of all the tributes.
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  • ALEXANDER WEDDERBURN ROSSLYN, 1sT Earl of (1733-1805), Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, was the eldest son of Peter Wedderburn (a lord of session as Lord Chesterhall), and was born in East Lothian on the 13th of February 1733.
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  • His father was called to the bench in 1755, and for the next three years Wedderburn stuck to his practice in Edinburgh, during which period he employed his oratorical powers in the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, and passed his evenings in the social and argumentative clubs which abound in Edinburgh.
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  • In 1755 the precursor of the later Edinburgh Review was started, now chiefly remembered because in its pages Adam Smith criticized the dictionary of Dr Johnson, and because the contents of its two numbers were edited by Wedderburn.
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  • The dean of faculty at this time, Lockhart, afterwards Lord Covington, a lawyer notorious for his harsh demeanour, in the autumn of 1757 assailed Wedderburn with more than ordinary insolence.
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  • When George Grenville, whose principles leaned to Toryism, quarrelled with the 'court, Wedderburn affected to regard him as his leader in politics.
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  • Junius wrote of him, "As for Mr Wedderburn, there is something about him which even treachery cannot trust," and Colonel Barre attacked him in the House of Commons.
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  • In June 1778 Wedderburn was promoted to the post of attorney-general, and in the same year he refused the dignity of chief baron of the exchequer because the offer was not accompanied by the promise of a peerage.
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  • The resignation of Pitt on the question of Catholic emancipation (1801) put an end to Wedderburn's tenure of the Lord Chancellorship, for, much to his surprise, no place was found for him in Addington's cabinet.
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  • In Wedderburn's character ambition banished all rectitude of principle, but the love of money for money's sake was not among his faults.
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  • Wedderburn, Bart., Allan Octavian Hume, C.B.: Father of the Indian National Congress (1913); and Allan O.
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  • Alexander Wedderburn was created Baron Loughborough in 1780 when he became chief justice of the common pleas.
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  • At the bar Wedderburn was the most elegant speaker of his time, and, although his knowledge of the principles and precedents of law was deficient, his skill in marshalling facts and his clearness of diction were marvellous; on the bench his judgments were remarkable for their perspicuity, particularly in the appeal cases to the House of Lords.
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