Vries sentence example

vries
  • The views of de Vries and others as to the importance of " saltatory variation," the soundness of which was still by no means generally accepted in 1910, may be gathered from the articles Mendelismvi and Variation.
    0
    0
  • Izuno Oshima (Vries The volcano on this island is called Island) (lIti) 2461.
    0
    0
  • The leaders, one of whom was Captain David P. de Vries, wished " to plant a colony for the cultivation of grain and tobacco as well as to carry on the whale fishery in that region."
    0
    0
  • A portion of it was regranted to David Pietersen de Vries in 1636 and in 1642 the remainder was erected into a patroonship and granted to Cornelis Melyn.
    0
    0
  • In 1641 de Vries established a settlement at Oude Dorp (Old Town), near Arrochar Park, near South Beach.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Phyletic gaps began to be filled in this general way, however, by discovery, especially through remarkable 1 The Dutch botanist, De Vries, has employed the term in another sense, to mean a slight jump or saltation.
    0
    0
  • The essence of Waagen's law is orthogenesis, or evolution in a definite direction, and, if there does exist an internal hereditary principle controlling such orthogenetic evolution, there does not appear to be any essential contradiction between its gradual operation in the " mutations of Waagen " and its occasional hurried operation in the " mutations of de Vries," which are by their definition discontinuous or saltatory (Osborn, 1907).
    0
    0
  • This varying rate of evolution has (illogically, we believe) been compared with and advanced in support of the "mutation law of De Vries,"or the theory of saltatory evolution, which we may next consider.
    0
    0
  • The Kurile Islands were discovered in 1634 by the Dutch navigator Martin de Vries.
    0
    0
  • Sakhalin, which was under Chinese dominion until the 19th century, became known to Europeans from the travels of Martin Gerritz de Vries in the 17th century, and still better from those of La Perouse (1787) and Krusenstern (1805).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • De Vries gave the name "mutations" to such considerable variations (it is to be noted that a further concept, that of the mode of origin, has been added to the word mutation, and that the conception of relative size is being removed from it), and Bateson, de Vries and other writers have added many striking cases to those recorded by Darwin.
    0
    0
  • The variations which de Vries has called mutations, and which were at first associated by Bateson with what he called discontinuous variations as the exclusive source of new species, are now supposed by de Vries to be distinguished from fluctuating variations by their mode of origin.
    0
    0
  • In the second place, it has been urged, particularly by de Vries, that experiment and observation have shown that the possible range of fluctuating variation is strictly limited.
    0
    0
  • Something will be said later in this article as to the limitation of variation; here it is necessary only to say that de Vries is introducing no new idea.
    0
    0
  • And finally, there are a series of variations, amongst which no doubt are the mutations of de Vries and the disintegrations and recombinations of the unit factors with which Mendel and his followers have worked, in which the external or environmental factor is most remote from the actual result.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • As an example of extreme asymmetry we may take de Vries's record of the frequency with which given numbers of petals occur in a certain race of buttercups.
    0
    0
  • A kind of philosophical club had been formed, including among its members Simon de Vries, John Bresser, Louis Meyer, and others who appear in Spinoza's correspondence.
    0
    0
  • An interesting specimen of such difficulties propounded by Simon de Vries and resolved by Spinoza in accordance with his own principles, is preserved for us in Spinoza's correspondence.
    0
    0
  • This Simon de Vries was a youth of generous impulses and of much promise.
    0
    0
  • De Vries died young, and would fain have left his fortune to Spinoza; but the latter refused to stand in the way of his brother, the natural heir, to whom the property was accordingly left, with the condition that he should pay to Spinoza an annuity sufficient for his maintenance.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Probably the oldest example of this genus in cultivation is in the Botanic Garden of Amsterdam, its age is considered by Professor de Vries to be about two thousand years: although an accurate determination of age is impossible, there is no doubt that many cycads grow very slowly and are remarkable for longevity.
    0
    0