Vergniaud sentence example

vergniaud
  • Vergniaud certainly was far superior to him in oratory, but Brissot was quick, eager, impetuous, and a man of wide knowledge.
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  • As an orator his eloquence has been likened to that of both Bossuet and Vergniaud, but it had neither the polish of the old 17th century bishop nor the flashes of genius of the young Girondin.
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  • These deputies were twelve in number, six of whom - the lawyers Vergniaud, Guadet, Gensonne, Grangeneuve and Jay, and the tradesman Jean Francois Ducos - sat both in the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention.
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  • Some submitted, among them Gensonne, Guadet, Vergniaud, Petion, Birotteau and Boyer-Fonfrede.
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  • On the 28th of July a decree of the Convention proscribed, as traitors and enemies of their country, twenty-one deputies, the final list of those sent for trial comprising the names of Antiboul, Boilleau the younger, Boyer-Fonfrede, Brissot, Carra, Duchastel, the younger Ducos, Dufriche de Valaze, Duprat, Fauchet, Gardien, Gensonne, Lacaze, Lasource, Lauze-Deperret, Lehardi, Lesterpt-Beauvais, the elder Minvielle, Sillery, Vergniaud and Viger, of whom five were deputies from the Gironde.
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  • In his presence young Vergniaud on one occasion recited some verses of his own composition.
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  • Turgot was struck with the talent they displayed, and by virtue of his patronage Vergniaud, having gone to Paris, was admitted to the college of Plessis.
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  • It is impossible to read the speeches of Vergniaud without being convinced of the solidity of his education, and in particular of the wide range of his knowledge of the classics, and of his acquaintance - familiar and sympathetic - with ancient philosophy and history.
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  • Duputy, president of the parlement of Bordeaux, with whom Vergniaud became acquainted, conceived the greatest admiration and affection for him and appointed him his secretary.
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  • Vergniaud was thereafter called to the bar (1782).
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  • The influence of Duputy gained for him the beginnings of a practice; but Vergniaud, though capable of extraordinary efforts, too often relapsed into reverie, and was indisposed for study and sustained exertion, even in a cause which he approved.
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  • In 1789 Vergniaud was elected a member of the general council of the department of the Gironde.
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  • Abandoning all reserve, Vergniaud delivered one of the great orations of his life, depicting the misfortunes of the peasantry in language of such combined dignity, pathos and power that his fame as an orator spread far and wide.
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  • Vergniaud was chosen a representative of the Gironde to the National Legislative Assembly in August 1791, and he forthwith proceeded to Paris.
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  • Between the outbreak of the Revolution and his election to the Legislative Assembly the political views of Vergniaud had undergone a decided change.
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  • The disgrace to his name is indelible that on the 19th of March 1792, when the perpetrators of the massacre of Avignon had been introduced to the Assembly by Collot d'Herbois, Vergniaud spoke indulgently of their crimes and lent the authority of his voice to their amnesty.
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  • On the 10th of March Vergniaud delivered a powerful oration in which he denounced the intrigues of the court and uttered his famous apostrophe to the Tuileries: "In ancient times fear and terror have often issued from that famous palace; let them re-enter it to-day in the name of the law!"
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  • By the month of June the opposition of Vergniaud (whose voice still commanded the country); to the king rose to fever heat.
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  • On the 29th of May Vergniaud went so far as to support the disbanding of the king's guard.
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  • This party used Vergniaud, whose lofty and serene ideas they applauded and travestied in action.
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  • Vergniaud presided.
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  • An extraordinary commission was appointed: Vergniaud wrote and read its recommendations that a National Convention be formed, the king be provisionally suspended from office, a governor appointed for his son, and the royal family be consigned to the Luxembourg.
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  • The great effort failed; and four days afterwards something happened which still further endangered Vergniaud and his whole party.
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  • Vergniaud voted early, and voted for death.
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  • On the 17th Vergniaud presided at the Convention, and it fell to him, labouring under the most painful excitement, to announce the fatal result of the voting.
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  • When the institution of a revolutionary tribunal was proposed, Vergniaud vehemently opposed the project, denouncing the tribunal as a more awful inquisition than that of Venice, and avowing that his party would all die rather than consent to it.
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  • On the 13th Vergniaud boldly exposed the conspiracy in the Convention.
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  • He fastened especially upon Vergniaud's letter to the king and his support of the appeal to the people as a proof that he was a moderate in its then despised sense.
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  • Vergniaud made a brilliant extemporaneous reply, and the attack for the moment failed.
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  • But now, night after night, Vergniaud and his colleagues found themselves obliged to change their abode, to avoid assassination, a price being even put upon their heads.
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  • Vergniaud was offered a safe retreat.
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  • On one of the walls of the Carmelite convent to which for a short time the prisoners were removed Vergniaud wrote in letters of blood: "Potius mori quam foedari."
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  • Vergniaud was executed last.
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  • The Girondins could claim the most brilliant orators, Vergniaud, Guadet, Isnard.
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