Uitlanders sentence example

uitlanders
  • He returned to the Cape in February 1899 fully assured of the support of Mr Chamberlain, though the government still clung to the hope that the moderate section of the Cape and Free State Dutch would induce Kruger to deal justly with the Uitlanders.
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  • Milner felt that only the enfranchisement of the Uitlanders in the Transvaal would give stability to the South African situation.
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  • The Imperial Light Horse and other irregular corps were recruited in Natal, although the bulk of the men in the forces were Uitlanders from Johannesburg.
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  • In later years this complaint was precisely that of the Uitlanders at Johannesburg.
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  • Yet in spite of the wealth which the industry of the Uitlanders was creating, a policy of rigid political exclusion and restriction was adopted towards them.
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  • In 1890 a feeling of considerable irritation had grown up among the Uitlanders at the various monopolies, but particularly at the dynamite monopoly, which pressed solely and with peculiar severity upon gold miners.
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  • This incensed Kruger so much that for many years he continued to quote it as a reason why no consideration could be granted to the Uitlanders.
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  • By 1892 the Uitlanders began to feel that if they were to obtain any redress for their grievances combined constitutional action was called for, and the first reform move ment began.
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  • They, in common with the great bulk of the Uitlanders, recognized that the state had every right to have its independence respected.
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  • In 1894 there occurred an incident which not only incensed the Uitlanders to fury, but called for British intervention.
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  • At this time the Uitlanders formed a majority of the population, owned half the land and nine-tenths of the property, and they were at least entitled to a hearing.
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  • At this juncture (October 1895) came overtures to the leading Uitlanders.
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  • Rhodes and Jameson, after considerable deliberation, came to the conclusion that they might advantageously intervene between Kruger and the Uitlanders.
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  • Between them it was arranged that Jameson should gather a force of Boo men on the Transvaal border; that the Uitlanders should continue their agitation; and that, should no satisfactory concession be obtained from Kruger, a combined movement of armed forces should be made against the government.
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  • The arsenal at Pretoria was to be seized; the Uitlanders in Johannesburg were to rise and hold the town.
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  • Apart from the difficulty of obtaining arms, a serious question arose at the eleventh hour which filled some of the Uitlanders with mistrust.
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  • On the following day, the 7th of January, Sir Hercules telegraphed again through the British agent, who was then at Johannesburg, saying: " That if the Uitlanders do not comply with my request they will forfeit all claims to sympathy from Her Majesty's government and from British subjects throughout the world, as the lives of Jameson and the prisoners are now practically in their hands."
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  • The two thousand odd rifles which had been distributed among the Uitlanders were then given up. With regard to the inducements to this step urged upon the reform committee by the high commissioner, it is only necessary to say with reference to the first that the grievances never were considered, and with reference to the second it subsequently appeared that one of the conditions of the surrender of Jameson's force at Doornkop was that the lives of the men should be spared.
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  • Six days before Sir Alfred Milner had telegraphed to London a summary of the situation, comparing the position of the Uitlanders to that of helots and declaring the case for intervention to be overwhelming.
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  • In November of 1901 the main body of the Uitlanders were allowed to return to the Rand.
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  • There was a great development in the mining industry during 18 971898 and 1899, thei value of the gold extracted in 1898 exceeding £15,000,000, but the political situation grew worse, and in September 1899, owing to the imminence of war between the Transvaal and Great Britain, the majority of the Uitlanders fled from the city.
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  • The Uitlanders were increasing in numbers, as well as providing the state with a revenue.
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  • In 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1894 the franchise laws (which at the time of the convention were on a liberal basis) were so modified that all Uitlanders were practically excluded altogether.
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  • The action taken by President Kruger at this election, and his previous actions in ousting President Burgers and in absolutely excluding the Uitlanders from the franchise, all show that at any cost, in his opinion, the government must remain a close corporation, and that while he lived he must remain at the head of it.
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  • It may be summed up in his own words when replying to a deputation of Uitlanders, who desired to obtain the legalization of the use of the English language in the Transvaal.
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  • This rejection of the advances of the Uitlandersby whose aid he could have built up a free and stable republic - led to his downfall, though the failure of the Jameson Raid in the first days of 1896 gave him a signal opportunity to secure the safety of his country by the grant of real reforms. But the Raid taught him no lesson of this kind, and despite the intervention of the British government the Uitlanders' grievances were not remedied.
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  • To admit Uitlanders to the franchise, to no matter how moderate a degree, would destroy the independence of the state.
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  • The wider outlook which would have sought to win the Uitlanders (as they were called) to the side of the republic was entirely lacking.
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  • Nine-tenths of the state revenue was contributed by the Uitlanders, yet they had not even any municipal power.
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  • The Uitlanders once more petitioned, over 34,000 persons signing a memorial to the Raad for the extension of the franchise.
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  • Up to this period a section of the Uitlanders had believed that Kruger and his following would listen to reason; now all realized that such an expectation was vain.
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  • It might have succeeded but for a vital difference which arose between the Uitlanders in Johannesburg and Rhodes.
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  • It did more, it divided British opinion, sympathy for the Boer republics leading in some cases to a disregard for the real grievances of the Uitlanders.
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  • In the Transvaal, meantime, the situation of the Uitlanders grew worse.
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  • The retirement of Lord Rosemead (Sir Hercules Robinson) from the post of high commissioner was, however, taken advantage of by the British government to appoint an administrator who should at the fitting opportunity insist on the redress of the Uitlanders' grievances.
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  • Once more the Uitlanders determined to make a further attempt to obtain redress by Reform constitutional means, and the second organized movement for reform began by the formation in 1897 of a branch of the South African League.
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  • At the end of 1898 the feelings of the Uitlanders were wrought up to fever pitch.
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  • And the best proofs alike of its power and its justice would be to obtain for the Uitlanders in the Transvaal a fair share in the government of the country which owes everything to their exertions.
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  • It would be no selfish demand, as other Uitlanders besides those of British birth would benefit by it.
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  • Milner practically confined his demands to a five years' franchise, which he helped would enable the Uitlanders to work out their own salvation.
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  • The Uitlanders, who had fled from Johannesburg just before the war opened, began to return in May 1901, and by the time the war ended most of the refugees were back on the Rand and mining was resumed.
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  • He evinced, as premier of the Cape Colony, the same inability to understand the Uitlanders' grievances, the same futile belief in the eventual fairness of President Kruger, as he had shown when giving evidence before the British South Africa Select Committee into the causes of the Jameson Raid.
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  • In the meantime, while the Boers were silently and steadily continuing their military preparations, the British settlers at Johannesllurg the Uitlanders, as they were calledcontinued to demand consideration for their grievances.
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  • He thought, at the time, that if the Uitlanders were given the franchise and a fair proportion of influence inthe legislature, other.
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  • He also realized - as was shown by the triumphant re-election of Mr Kruger to the presidency of the Transvaal in February 1898 - that the Pretoria government would never on its own initiative redress the grievances of the "Uitlanders."
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  • One member of the R.aad, during a debate in the chamber, called upon the Uitlanders to " come on and fight " for their rights if they wanted them.
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  • In March the Uitlanders, hopeless of ever obtaining redress from President Kruger, weary of sending petitions to the Raad only to be jeered at, determined to invoke intervention if nothing else could avail, and forwarded a petition to Queen Victoria.
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  • The persistent attempt of the South African Republic to assert its full independence, culminating in a formal denial of British suzerainty, made it additionally incumbent on Great Britain to carry its point as to the Uitlander grievances, while, from Mr Kruger's point of view, the admission of the Uitlanders to real political rights meant the doom of his oligarchical regime, and appeared in the light of a direct menace to Boer supremacy.
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  • Material prosperity was accompanied, how- ever, by political, educational and other disadvantages, and the desire of the Johannesburgers - most of whom were foreigners or "Uitlanders" - to remedy the grievances under which they suffered led, in January 1896, to an abortive rising against the Boer government (see Transvaal: History).
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  • Both high commissioner and the imperial government were hopeful that Kruger might even yet be induced to modify his policy; the Uitlanders now entertained no such hope and they prepared to appeal to arms to obtain redress of their grievances.
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  • The killing of Edgar was followed by the breaking up of a public meeting at Johannesburg, and in March the Uitlanders handed to the high commissioner a petition for intervention with 21,684 signatures attached to it '(see' Transvaal: History).
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