Ueberweg sentence example

ueberweg
  • Gilchrist, London, 1899); Ueberweg's History of Philosophy, vol.
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  • Botta in Ueberweg's Hist.
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  • Friedrich Ueberweg >>
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  • - Besides the sections on mysticism in the general histories of philosophy by Erdmann, Ueberweg and Windelband, and in works on church history and the history of dogma, reference may be made for the medieval period to Heinrich Schmid, Der Mysticismus in seiner Entstehungsperiode (1824); Charles Schmidt, Essai sur les mystiques du 14me siecle (1836) Ad.
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  • i.); compare with these the works on the history of philosophy by Ritter, Erdmann, Ueberweg and Zeller.
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  • As Ueberweg points out, his theory is rather a result of the transference of the Aristotelian conception of substance to the Platonic Idea, and of an identification of the relation of accidents to the substance in which they inhere with that of the individuals to the Idea of which, in the Platonic doctrine, they are copies (Hist.
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  • Ueberweg cites a passage from his theological works which apparently bears out this view, for William there expressly distinguishes the two senses of the word " same."
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  • difference of opinion as to his system, some, like Ritter and Erdmann, regarding it as a moderate form of Realism - a return indeed to the position of Aristotle - while others, like Cousin, Remusat, Haureau and Ueberweg, consider it to be essentially Nominalistic, only more prudently and perhaps less consistently expressed than was the case with Roscellinus.
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  • Albert was " the first Scholastic who reproduced the whole philosophy of Aristotle in systematic order with constant reference to the Arabic commentators, and who remodelled it to meet the requirements of ecclesiastical dogma " (Ueberweg, i.
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  • But, as Ueberweg points out, it might fairly be urged by Aquinas that he does not pretend to explain how the individual is actually created, but merely states what he finds to be an invariable condition of the existence of individuals.
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  • The accounts of medieval thought given by Ritter, Erdmann and Ueberweg in their general histories of philosophy are exceedingly good.
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  • et Gorgia, see Ueberweg, Grundriss d.
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  • 438-475 and 586-592, Zeller, Ueberweg, Erdmann, and works quoted under Sophists.
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  • Darstellung der Jiidisch-Alexandrinischen Religionsphilosophie (1834); Histories of Philosophy by Zeller, Ueberweg, Windelband, &c., and Bibliography of Church History, &c.
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  • Ferri, Essai sur l'histoire de la philosophie en Italie au XIX e siècle (1869); Ueberweg's Hist.
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  • This is the sense in which Kant often uses the term, and the usage is adopted by others - for example, in the following definition from Ueberweg's History of Philosophy: " The principle of scepticism is universal doubt, or at least doubt with regard to the validity of all judgments respecting that which lies beyond the range of experience."
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  • Ueberweg, and, more fully, by E.
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  • See Ueberweg, Grundriss der Gesch.
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  • For lists of treatises upon the life and teaching of particular sophists, see Ueberweg, Grundriss d.
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  • whether between the corresponding objective elements an analogous combination exists (Ueberweg).
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  • It requires no reference to reality beyond the sensible pressure, because it is merely a belief that this exists without inference of the external stimulus or any inference at all: not all judgment then requires the reference of subjective to objective supposed by Ueberweg, or the consciousness of logical necessity supposed by Sigwart.
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  • Meyer, Ueberweg's System der Logik, fiinfte vermehrte Auflage (Bonn, 1882); Max Miller, Science of Thought (London, 1887); Carveth Read, On the Theory of Logic (London, 1878); Logic, Deductive and Inductive (2nd ed., London, 1901); E.
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  • Among the innumerable writers who have thrown light upon Aristotle's logical doctrine, St Hilaire, Trendelenburg, Ueberweg, Hamilton, Mansel, G.
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  • Ueberweg, System der Logik, § iol.
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  • to Ueberweg, System, § 127, with a ref.
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  • Inference, curiously enough, falls under the technical side of dialectic concerned with knowledge in process or becoming, a line of cleavage which Ueberweg has rightly characterized as constituting a rift within Schleiermacher's parallelism.
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  • Some sort of correlationist conception, however, was an inevitable development, and the list' of those who accepted it in something of the spirit of Schleiermacher is a long one and contains many distinguished names, notably those of Trendelenburg and Ueberweg.
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  • The concept is accounted for in Kantian terms. There is no discontinuity between the pre-logical or sub-logical ' See Ueberweg, System of Logic and History of Logical Doctrines, § 34.
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  • Ueberweg (System § Ioi) is, on the whole, justified in exclaiming that Hegel's rehabilitation of syllogism " did but slight service to the Aristotelian theory of syllogism," yet his treatment of syllogism must be regarded as an acute contribution to logical criticism in the technical sense.
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  • 2 It is characteristic of Sigwart's point of view that he acknowledges obligation to Mill as well as to Ueberweg.
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  • Ueberweg's System der Logik and Geschichte der logischen Lehren (4th ed.
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  • FRIEDRICH UEBERWEG (1826-1871), German historian of philosophy, was born on the 22nd of January 1826 at Leichlingen, in Rhenish Prussia, where his father was Lutheran pastor.
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  • Lange, Friedrich Ueberweg (Berlin, 1871); M.
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  • Ueberweg's definition of it as "the science of the regulative laws of thought" (or "the normative science of thought") comes near enough to the traditional sense to enable us to compare profitably the usual subject-matter of the science with the definition and end of philosophy.
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  • Erdmann, Friedrich Ueberweg and W.
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  • Stockl and Karl Werner give the fullest and most trustworthy histories of the medieval period, but the subject is very carefully treated by Erdmann and Ueberweg, and a useful compendium, written from a Roman Catholic standpoint, is De Wulf's History of Medieval Philosophy (1900; Eng.
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  • Writers on the history of philosophy generally prefix to their work a discussion of the scope of philosophy, its divisions and its relations to other departments of knowledge, and the account given by Windelband and Ueberweg will be found specially good.
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  • See also the histories of philosophy and theology by Zeller, Ueberweg, Chalybdus, Dorner, Gass, Lichtenberger (Eng.
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  • (1885); appendix to Ueberweg's Hist.
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  • See also in general the latest edition of Ueberweg's Grundriss der Geschichte der Philosophie.
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  • (For its relation to the New Academy and to scepticism in general see Scepticism and Megarian School Of Philosophy.) See histories of philosophy by Zeller, Erdmann, Ueberweg; Ritter and Preller, § 364; Waddington, Pyrrhon et le pyrrhonisme (1877); Zimmermann, Darstellung d.
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  • Thus, though he looked on species as fixed, being the realization of an unchanging formative principle (c0vis), he seems, as Ueberweg observes, to have inclined to entertain the possibility of a spontaneous generation in the case of the lowest organisms.
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  • Ferri, Essai sur l'histoire de la philosophie en Italie au XIX e siècle (1869); Ueberweg's Hist.
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