Tabari sentence example

tabari
  • During the latter Sassanids it is seldom mentioned, and when the Arabs came to Khorasan (641-642) it was of so little importance that, as Tabari relates, it did not even have a garrison.
    0
    0
  • Nab, whose vizier Bal'ami translated Tabari's universal history into Persian (961976); Nab II.
    0
    0
  • From a Pahlavi inscription we learn that he was the son (not, as the Greek authors and Tabari say, the grandson) of Shapur I., and succeeded his brother Hormizd (Ormizdas) I., who had only reigned a year.
    0
    0
  • He is said to have built many great fire-temples, with large gardens and villages (Tabari).
    0
    0
  • The inhabitants of this land are said in Tabari's history to have been of three classes: - (s) The Tanukh (Tnuhs), who lived in tents and were made up of Arabs from the Tehama and Nejd, who had united in Bahrein to form a new tribe, and who migrated from there to Hira, probably at the beginning or middle of the 3rd century A.D., when the Arsacid power was growing weak.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The names of twenty kings are given by Hisham al-Kalbi in Tabari's history.
    0
    0
  • With regard to the history of Irak in particular he was deemed to have the best information, and for this subject he is Tabari's chief source, just as Madaini, a younger contemporary of Wagidi, is followed by preference in all that relates to Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Madaini's History of the Caliphs is the best, if not the oldest, published before Tabari; but this book is known only by the excerpts given by later writers, particularly Baladhuri and Tabari.
    0
    0
  • This has been essayed by Brunnow in his study on the Kharijites (aeiden, 1884), in which the narrative of Mubarrad in the Kamil is compared with the excerpts of Madaini given by Baladhuri and those of Abu Mikhnaf given by Tabari.
    0
    0
  • Tabari and his contemporaries, senior and junior, such as Ibn Qutaiba, Ya`gubi, Dinawari, preserve to us a good part of the information about Persian history made known through such translations.'
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • All these histories are more or less thrown into the shade by the great work of Tabari (q.v.), whose fame has never faded from his own day to ours.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, some interpolations took place, one in the 1 For details see the introduction to Noldeke's translation of Tabari's Geschichte der Perser and Araber zur Zeit der Sasaniden (aeiden, 1879).
    0
    0
  • Though he sometimes glided lightly over difficulties, his work is of service in fixing the text of Tabari.
    0
    0
  • The chief historians after Tabari may be briefly mentioned in chronological order.
    0
    0
  • But the majority were merely a band 1 Noldeke, Tabari, 246.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Its narrations are principally preserved in Tabari, though there combined with numerous, Arabian traditions; also in the poetical adaptation of Firdousi.
    0
    0
  • Of the Arabic sources Tabari is the most important.
    0
    0
  • According to the Arab historian, Tabari, these were written on 12,000 cowhides, a statement confirmed by Masudi, who writes: Zartusht gave to the Persians the book called Avesta.
    0
    0
  • Also that al-Mansur desired to make him judge, but compromised upon his inspectorship of buildings (so in Tabari).
    0
    0
  • See Nuldeke's version of Tabari, p. 204 sqq.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The commencement of this king's reign has been fixed by Noldeke (Geschichte der Sassaniden aus Tabari, p. 423) as 4th August 438; and this date has subsequently been established by documentary evidence from the fact of the martyrdom of Pethion (see Hoffmann, Ausziige aus syrischen Akten persischer Mdrtyrer, p. 67).
    0
    0