Schaff sentence example

schaff
  • See P. Schaff, Creeds of Christendom, i.
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  • Bibelwerk has been translated, enlarged and revised under the general editorship of Dr Philip Schaff.
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  • The bibliography can be found in Schaff's and in.
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  • P. Schaff, Creeds of the Evangelical Protestant Churches, p. 197.
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  • Kirche, and Zwingliana, P. Schaff, Creeds of the Evangelical Protestant Churches, p. 211.
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  • A continuation of it, containing selected works of the Nicene and post-Nicene period, was edited by Schaff and others under the title A Select Library of Nicene and post-Nicene Fathers (series 1 and 2; 28 vols., Buffalo and New York, 1886 ff.).
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  • See Ehrenfeuchter, Geschichte des Katechismus (187); P. Schaff, History of the Creeds of Christendom (3 vols., 1876-1877); Mitchell, Catechisms of the Second Reformation (1887); C. Achelis, Lehrbuch der prakt.
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  • Nevin (q.v.) became its president, and with Philip Schaff founded the Mercersburg theology, which lost to the Church many who objected to Nevin's (and Schaff's) Romanizing tendencies.
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  • He was instructor (1888-1890) and professor (1890-1893) of church history at Lane theological seminary, and in 1893 became Washburn professor of church history in Union theological seminary, succeeding Dr Philip Schaff.
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  • Nevin and Philip Schaff, whose names, and that of the seminary, are associated with the socalled "Mercersburg Theology."
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  • Nevin (q.v.), by its Neander-like view that Romanism and Protestantism were only stages in the divinely appointed development of the Christian Church, aroused fierce opposition in the Reformed Church and Schaff was characterized as "Puseyistic" and "semi-papistical"; in 1845 he was tried for heresy and found not guilty by the Synod.
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  • Schaff's broad views strongly influenced the German Reformed Church, through his teaching at Mercersburg, through his championship of English in German Reformed churches and schools in America, through his hymnal (18J9), through his labours as chairman of the committee which prepared a new liturgy, and by his edition (1863) of the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • His SOH, David Schley Schaff (1852-), was professor of church history in Lane Theological Seminary in 1897-1903, and after 1903 in Western Theological Seminary at Allegheny, Pa.
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  • He wrote a Commentary on the Book of Acts (1882) and a Life of Philip Schaff (New York, 1897).
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  • See P. Schaff, Living Divines (1887); Lichtenberger, Hist.
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  • He soon became prominent; first by his contributions to its organ the Messenger; then by The Anxious Bench - A Tract for the Times (1843), attacking the vicious excesses of revivalistic methods; and by his defence of the inauguration address, The Principle of Protestantism, delivered by his colleague Philip Schaff, which aroused a storm of protest by its suggestion that Pauline Protestantism was not the last word in the development of the church but that a Johannean Christianity was to be its outgrowth, and by its recognition of Petrine Romanism as a stage in ecclesiastical development.
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  • To Dr Schaff's 122 theses of The Principle of Protestantism Nevin added his own theory of the mystical union between Christ and believers, and both Schaff and Nevin were accused of a "Romanizing tendency."
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  • With Dr Schaff and others he was on the committee which prepared the liturgy of the German Reformed Church, which appeared in provisional form in 1857 and as An Order of Worship in 1866.
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  • Janeway of New Brunswick published his Antidote to the Poison of Popery in the Writings and Conduct of Professors Nevin and Schaff.
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