Scaliger sentence example

scaliger
  • He soon learned to call to his aid the subsidiary sciences of geography and chronology, and before he was quite capable of reading them had already attempted to weigh in his childish balance the competing systems of Scaliger and Petavius, of Marsham and Newton.
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  • That he displayed considerable classical knowledge, was a good linguist, a ready and versatile writer of verse, and above all that he possessed an astounding memory, seems certain, not only from the evidence of men of his own time, but from the fact that even Joseph Scaliger (Prima Scaligerana, p. 58, 1669) speaks of his attainments with the highest praise.
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  • To dwell upon such literary infamies would be below the dignity of the historian, were it not that these habits of the early Italian humanists imposed a fashion upon Europe which extended to the later age of Scaliger's contentions with Scioppius and Milton's with Salmasius.
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  • He became involved in a controversy with Joseph Justus Scaliger, formerly his intimate friend, and others, wrote Ecclesiasticus auctoritati Jacobi regis oppositus (1611), an attack upon James I.
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  • Besides the works already noticed, he wrote De arte critica (1597); De Antichristo (1605); Pro auctoritate ecclesiae in decidendis fidei controversiis libellus; Scaliger hypololymaeus (1607), a virulent attack on Scaliger; and latterly the anti-jesuitical works, Flagellum Jesuiticum (1632); Mysteria patrum jesuitorum (1633); and Arcana societatis Jesu (1635).
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  • The list of professors and alumni is long and illustrious, containing, among others, the names of Bembo, Sperone Speroni, Veselius, Acquapendente, Galileo, Pomponazzi, Pole, Scaliger, Tasso and Sobieski.
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  • Three elegies were formerly attributed to Pedo by Scaliger; two on the death of Maecenas (In Obitum Maecenatis and De Verbis Maecenatis moribundi), and one addressed to Livia to console her for the death of her son Drusus (Consolatio ad Liviam de Morte Drusi or Epicedion Drusi, usually printed with Ovid's works); but it is now generally agreed that they are not by Pedo.
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  • Alboin, the Lombard king, captured it in 568, and it was one of the chief residences of the Lombard, and later of the Frankish, monarchs; and though, like other cities of northern Italy, it suffered much during the Guelph and Ghibelline struggles, it rose to a foremost position both from the political and the artistic point of view under its various rulers of the Scaliger or Della Scala family.
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  • De Emendatione Temporum, by Joseph Scaliger, in which were laid the foundations of chronological science.
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  • ACCIUS, a Latin poet of the 16th century, to whom is attributed a paraphrase of Aesop's Fables, of which Julius Scaliger speaks with great praise.
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  • Pierre Eyquem, Montaigne's father, had been engaged in commerce (a herring-merchant Scaliger calls him, and his grandfather Ramon had certainly followed that trade), had filled many municipal offices in Bordeaux, and had served under Francis I.
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  • He complains that much reading of the works of St Jerome had spoiled his Latin; but, as Scaliger says (Scalig er 2 a), " Erasmus's language is better than St Jerome's."
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  • In the annals of classical learning Erasmus may be regarded as constituting an intermediate stage between the humanists of the Latin Renaissance and the learned men of the age of Greek scholarship, between Angelo Poliziano and Joseph Scaliger.
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  • Scaliger, "is full of sad blunders" (Scalig er 2 a).
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  • In the 6th century, besides Calvin and Bonivard, we have Isaac Casaubon, the scholar; Robert and Henri Estienne, the printers, and, from 1572 to 1574, Joseph Scaliger himself, though but for a short time.
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  • The cause of the Ciceronians was defended by the elder Scaliger in 1531 and 1536, and by Etienne Dolet in 1535, and the controversy was continued by other scholars down to the year 1610.
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  • It includes Budaeus and the elder Scaliger (who settled in France in 1529), with Turnebus and Lambinus, and the learned printers Robertus and Henricus Stephanus, while among its foremost names are those of the younger (and greater) Scaliger, Casaubon and Salmasius.
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  • Of these, Casaubon ended his days in England (1614); Scaliger, by leaving France for the Netherlands in 1593, for a time at least transferred the supremacy in scholarship from the land of his birth to that of his adoption.
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  • In 1637, when the doubts of Scaliger and Heinsius as to the purity of the Greek of the New Testament prompted the rector of Hamburg to introduce the study of classical authors, any reflection on the style of the Greek Testament was bitterly resented.
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  • Of the numerous churches the chief are the Hooglandsche Kerk, or the church of St Pancras, built in the 15th century and restored in 18851 9 02, containing the monument of Pieter Andriaanszoon van der Werf, and the Pieterskerk (1315) with monuments to Scaliger, Boerhaave and other famous scholars.
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  • The presence within half a century of the date of its foundation of such scholars as Justus Lipsius, Joseph Scaliger, Francis Gomarus, Hugo Grotius, Jacobus Arminius, Daniel Heinsius and Guardas Johannes Vossius, at once raised Leiden university to the highest European fame, a position which the learning and reputation of Jacobus Gronovius, Hermann Boerhaave, Tiberius Hem sterhuis and David Ruhnken, among others, enabled it to maintain down to the end of the 18th century.
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  • It Has Been Stated By Scaliger, Weidler, Montucla, And Others, That The Modern Persians Actually Follow This Method, And Intercalate Eight Days In Thirty Three Years.
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  • The Julian period, proposed by the celebrated Joseph Scaliger as an universal measure of chronology, is formed by taking the continued product of the three cycles of the sun, of the moon, and of the indiction,and is consequently 28 X 19X I 5= 7980 years.
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  • In 1855 he resigned the tutorship, travelled in Germany to investigate Continental systems of education, and began his researches into the lives of Casaubon and Scaliger, which occupied the remainder of his life.
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  • His projected Life of Scaliger was never finished.
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  • Scaliger, whose habit it was to engage his young friends in the editing of some classical text.
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  • Of the Germanicus Scaliger says - "A better text than that which Grotius has given, it is impossible to give"; but it is probable that Scaliger had himself been the reviser.
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  • His commentaries on the Scriptures were the first application on an extensive scale of the principle affirmed by Scaliger, that, namely, of interpretation by the rules of grammar without dogmatic assumptions.
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  • His editions and translations of the classics were either juvenile exercises prescribed by Scaliger, or "lusus poetici," the amusement of vacant hours.
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  • This does not of necessity mean that we should adopt Scaliger's critique of the younger Aldo without reservation.
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  • Scaliger called him "a povertystricken talent, slow in operation; his work is very commonplace; he aped his father."
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  • Scaliger (1595), F.
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  • Educated at Paris University, he came under the influence of Isaac Scaliger, who directed his attention towards the obscurer fathers of the Church.
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  • Carrying on and improving the chronological labours of Scaliger, he published in 1627 an Opus de doctrina temporum, which has been often reprinted.
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  • Editio princeps, 1472; editions by Scaliger 1575, Souchay 1730, Schenkl 1883, Peiper 1886; cf.
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  • Julius Caesar Scaliger (1484-1558), So distinguished by his learning and talents that, according to A.
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  • The orations were followed by a prodigious quantity of Latin verse, which appeared in successive volumes in 1 533, 1 534, 1 539, 1 54 6 and 1547; of these, a friendly critic, Mark Pattison, is obliged to approve the judgment of Huet, who says, "par ses poesies brutes et informes Scaliger a deshonore le Parnasse"; yet their numerous editions show that they commended themselves not only to his contemporaries, but to succeeding scholars.
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  • C. Scaliger ought to be judged.
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  • His Exercitationes upon the De subtilitate of Cardan (1557) is the book by which Scaliger is best known as a philosopher.
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  • Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the greatest scholar of modern times, was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Rogues Lobejac. Born at Agen in 1540, he was sent when twelve years of age, with two younger brothers, to the college of Guienne at Bordeaux, then under the direction of Jean Gelida.
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  • It was to Dorat that Scaliger owed the home which he found for the next thirty years of his life.
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  • Muretus soon recognized Scaliger's merits, and introduced him to all the men that were worth knowing.
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  • After visiting a large part of Italy, the travellers passed to England and Scotland, taking as it would seem La Roche Pozay on their way, for Scaliger's preface to his first book, the Conjectanea in Varronem, is dated there in December 1564.
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  • Scaliger formed an unfavourable opinion of the English.
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  • Of his life during this period we have interesting details and notices in the Lettres francaises inedites de Joseph Scaliger, edited by M Tamizey de Larroque (Agen, 1881).
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  • But these works, while proving Scaliger's right to the foremost place among his contemporaries as Latin scholar and critic, did not go beyond mere scholarship. It was reserved for his edition of Manilius (1579), and his De emendatione temporum (1583), to revolutionize all the received ideas of ancient chronology - to show that ancient history is not confined to that of the Greeks and Romans, but also comprises that of the Persians, the Babylonians and the Egyptians, hitherto neglected as absolutely worthless, and that of the Jews, hitherto treated as a thing apart, and that the historical narratives and fragments of each of these, and their several systems of chronology, must be critically compared, if any true and general conclusions are to be reached.
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  • It is this which places Scaliger on so immeasurably higher an eminence than any of his contemporaries.
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  • When in 1590 Lipsius retired from Leiden, the university and its protectors, the states-general of Holland and the prince of Orange, resolved to obtain Scaliger as his successor.
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  • Scaliger would not be required to lecture.
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  • This offer Scaliger provisionally accepted.
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  • For Scaliger was no hermit buried among his books; he was fond of social intercourse and was himself a good talker.
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  • But Scaliger had made numerous enemies.
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  • The Jesuits, who aspired to be the source of all scholarship and criticism, perceived that the writings and authority of Scaliger were the most formidable barrier to their claims. It was the day of conversions.
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  • Lipsius had been reconciled to the Church of Rome; Casaubon was supposed to be wavering; but Scaliger was known to be hopeless, and as long as his supremacy was unquestioned the Protestants had the victory in learning and scholarship. A determined attempt must be made, if not to answer his criticisms, or to disprove his statements, yet to attack him as a man, and to destroy his reputation.
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  • Scaliger's weak point was his pride.
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  • In 1607 Gaspar Scioppius, then in the service of the Jesuits, whom he afterwards so bitterly libelled, published his Scaliger hypobolimaeus (" The Supposititious Scaliger"), a quarto volume of more than four hundred pages, written with consummate ability, in an admirable and incisive style, with the entire disregard for truth which Scioppius always displayed, and with all the power of his accomplished sarcasm.
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  • Every piece of scandal which could be raked together respecting Scaliger or his family is to be found there.
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  • The author professes to point out five hundred lies in the Epistola de vetustate of Scaliger, but the main argument of the book is to show the falsity of his pretensions to be of the family of La Scala, and of the narrative of his father's early life.
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  • "No stronger proof," says Mark Pattison, "can be given of the inpressions produced by this powerful philippic, dedicated to the defamation of an individual, than that it has been the source from which the biography of Scaliger, as it now stands in our biographical collections, has mainly flowed."
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  • To Scaliger the blow was crushing.
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  • It is written, for Scaliger, with unusual moderation and good taste, but perhaps for that very reason had not the success which its author wished and even expected.
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  • Scaliger undoubtedly shows that Scioppius committed more blunders than he corrected, that his book literally bristles with pure lies and baseless calumnies; but he does not succeed in adducing a single proof either of his father's descent from the La Scala family, or of any single event narrated by Julius as happening to himself or any member of this family prior to his arrival at Agen.
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  • Scioppius was wont to boast that his book had killed Scaliger.
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  • Of Joseph Scaliger the only biography in any way adequate is that of Jacob Bernays (Berlin, 1855).
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  • Pattison had made many manuscript collections for a life of Joseph Scaliger on a much more extensive scale, which he left unfinished.
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  • In writing the above article, Professor Christie had access to and made much use of these MSS., which include a life of Julius Caesar Scaliger.
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  • The fragments of the life of Joseph Scaliger have been printed in the Essays, i.
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  • Magen's Documents sur Julius Caesar Scaliger et sa famille (Agen, 1873) add important details for the lives of both father and son.
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  • Special studies have been made by Baronius, Miraeus, Labbe, Valesius, Halloix, Scaliger, Ceillier, Cave, Dupin, Pagi, Ittig, Tillemont, Walch, Gibbon, Schroeckh, Lardner.
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  • After travelling in Germany and Poland (where he learnt Polish), he began the study of law at Leiden, but he soon turned his attention to history and geography, which were then taught there by Joseph Scaliger.
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  • Scaliger's refutation, which was to contain an equal number of volumes of the errors in Baronius.
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  • Scaliger >>
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  • At the age of eighteen he attracted the notice of the elder Scaliger, and was invited to lecture in the archiepiscopal college at Auch.
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  • In this letter, Scaliger offered Meursius to forward a letter to his friend Marcus Welser, a famous antiquarian in Augsburg.
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  • Scaliger often entrusted his letters for German scholars to merchants traveling twice a year to the famous Bookfair in Frankfurt.
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  • Among later editions we may mention the following, those with explanatory or critical notes being marked with an asterisk: * Scaliger (1577, &c.), *Broukhusius (2nd ed., 1577), *Passeratius (1608, with index verborum), *Vulpius (1755, with index verborum), *P. Burmann (and Santen) (1780), *Lachmann (1816), *Hertzberg (1843-1845), L.
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  • - Although the Julian period (the invention of Joseph Scaliger, in 1582) is not, properly speaking, a chronological era, yet, on account of its affording considerable facilities in the comparison of different eras with one another, and in marking without ambiguity the years before Christ, it is very generally employed by chronologers.
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  • He is best known as a scholar by his notes on Martial, Ausonius, the Pervigilium Veneris; editions of the poems of Scaliger (Leiden, 1615), of the De re militari of Vegetius Renatus, the tragedies of Seneca (P. Scriverii collectanea veterum tragicorum, 1621), &c. His Opera anecdota, philologica, et poetica (Utrecht, 1738) were edited by A.
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  • SCALIGER, the Latinized name of the great Della Scala family (see Verona).
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