Sayce sentence example

sayce
  • Whether the national hieroglyphic system of the Hittites expressed the same Indo-European language as, according to Hrozny, their cuneiform does, we do not know, as further attempts to elucidate it made by Campbell Thompson 11 and Cowley," while in themselves very interesting experiments, do not seem to take us further than previous attempts by Sayce and others.
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  • But there is no evidence for his "cyclic date" of 2517 B.C., on which his system depended, and there is little doubt that the beginning of the historical period of Berossus is to be set, not in 2506 B.C., but in 2232 B.C. The two systems of Sayce,' that of Rogers,' the three systems of Winckler, 5 both those of Delitzsch, 6 and that of Maspero, 7 may be grouped together, for they are based on the same principle.
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  • In 1876 Sayce pointed out the resemblance between certain Hittite signs and characters in the lately deciphered Cypriote syllabary, and suggested that the comparison might lead to a beginning of decipherment; but the hope has proved vain.
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  • Sayce and P. Jensen alone have enlisted any large body of adherents; and the former, who has worked upon his system for thirty years and published in the Proceedings of the Society for Biblical Archaeology for 1907 a summary of his method and results, has proceeded on the more scientific plan.
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  • Other conjectural identifications of groups of symbols with the place-names Hamath, Marash, Tyana are bases of Sayce's system.
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  • Messerschmidt in his Bemerkungen (1898); but Sayce's system, which has been approved by Hommel and others, is probably in its main lines correct.
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  • Sayce's phonetic values and interpretations of determinatives are his best assured achievements.
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  • In some significant cases, however, the Boghaz Keui tablets appear to give striking confirmation of Sayce's conjectures.
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  • Since all the Syrian monuments of the Hittite class, so far known, seem comparatively late (most show such strong Assyrian influence that they must fall after 110o B.C. and probably even considerably later), while the North Cappadocian monuments (as Sayce, Ramsay, Perrot and others saw long ago) are the earlier in style, we are bound to ascribe the origin of the civilization which they represent to the Cappadocian Hatti.
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  • They claim to rule the Kasu'or Meroitic Ethiopians; and the fifth inscription records an expedition along the Atbara and the Nile to punish the Nuba and Kasu, and a fragment of a Greek inscription from Meroe was recognized by Sayce as commemorating a king of Axum.
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  • Of these three views, it is only the ' See Smith and Sayce, Chaldaean Genesis, p. 88; Delitzsch, Wo lag das Paradies ?
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  • The doubling of the sign of Pisces still recalls, according to Sayce, 8 the arrangement of the Babylonian calendar, in which a year of 360 days was supplemented once in six years by a thirteenth month, a second Adar.
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  • This is significant enough; Prof. Sayce, the most brilliant and distinguished of the " anti-critics," does not really reoccupy the position of the " able and pious men " of the mid-19th century, to whom " even to speak of any portion of the Bible as a history " was " an outrage upon religion " (Stanley, Jewish Church, Preface); these may still have pious, but they have no longer scholarly successors.
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  • Prof. Sayce travels farther back, it is true, but on critical lines: he abandons the Pentateuchal criticism of the 10th century, to reoccupy the critical position of Hobbes, Spinoza and Simon in the 17th century - whether reasonably or not must here be left an open question.
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  • The people of Amar are represented on the Egyptian monuments with yellow skin, blue eyes, red eyebrows and beard, whence it has been conjectured that they were akin to the Libyans (Sayce, Expositor, July 1888).
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  • Sayce (Modern Review, 5884, pp. 158-169), cannot easily be explained.
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  • Symbols exactly like k, X, and (a), X, are found in the Carian alphabet, and transliterated by Professor Sayce 1 as v (and ii), h and kh respectively.
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  • See Sayce, "Cuneiform Inscriptions of Lake Van," in Journal of Royal Asiatic Society, vols.
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  • The truth is, no doubt, as Prof. Sayce points out, that the book of Daniel was not meant to be strictly historical.
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  • See Sayce, Hibbert Lectures, Religion of Ancient Babylonia, p. 129.
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  • In Babylonian mythology "the old serpent goddess ` the lady Nina' was transformed into the embodiment of all that was hostile to the powers of heaven" (Sayce's Hibbert Lectures, p. 283), and was confounded with the dragon Tiamat, "a terrible monster, reappearing in the Old Testament writings as Rahab and Leviathan, the principle of chaos, the enemy of God and man" (Tennant's The Fall and Original Sin, p. 43), and according to Gunkel (Schopfung and Chaos, p. 383) "the original of the ` old serpent ' of Rev. xii.
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  • The Sumerians and Accadians, the non-Semitic inhabitants of the Euphrates valley prior to the Babylonians, described the stars collectively as a " heavenly flock "; the sun was the " old sheep "; the seven planets were the " old-sheep stars "; the whole of the stars had certain " shepherds, " and Sibzianna (which, according to Sayce and Bosanquet, is the modern Arcturus, the brightest star in the northern sky) was the " star of the shepherds of the heavenly herds."
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  • Lynda Sayce Lynda Sayce read Music at Oxford University then studied lute with Jakob Lindberg at the Royal College of Music.
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  • I See Sayce, Early Israel, pp. 281 ff., and Encyc. Brit., 10th ed., vol.
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  • In a word, the Hebrew Genesis shows unequivocal evidence of Babylonian origin, but, in the words of Professor Sayce, it is but "a paraphrase and not a translation."
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  • Professor Sayce, one of the most distinguished of modern Assyriologists, writing as an opponent of the purely destructive "Higher Criticism," demands no more than that the Book of Genesis "shall take rank by the side of the other monuments of the past as the record of events which have actually happened and been handed on by credible men"; that it shall, in short, be admitted to be "a collection of ancient documents which have all the value of contemporaneous testimony," but which being in themselves "wrecks of vast literatures which extended over the Oriental world from a remote epoch," cannot be understood aright "except in the light of the contemporaneous literature of which they form a portion."
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  • On examination, the authors of anticritica are generally found to disown, tacitly or openly, the first of these alternatives; for example, Prof. Sayce, who frequently takes the field against the " higher criticism," and denies, without, however, disproving, the validity of the literary analysis of the Hexateuch, nevertheless himself asserts that " no one can study the Pentateuch.
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  • It is most probable, however, that it was the city which was deified (see Sayce, Religion of Ancient Egypt and Babylonia, 1902, pp. 366, 367).
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