Saxo sentence example

saxo
  • The chronicler Saxo Grammaticus mentions in his Gesta Danorum the "rampart of Jutland" (Jutiae moenia) as having been once more extended by Valdemar the Great (1157-1182), which has been cited among the proofs that Schleswig (S4 nderjylland) forms an integral part of Jutland (Manuel hist.
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  • The original road was no doubt only gravelled (glarea strata); in 298 B.C. a footpath was laid saxo quadrato from the Porta Capena, by which it left Rome, to the temple of Mars, about 1 m.
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  • Corresponding to Proserpine as goddess of the dead is the old Norse goddess Hel (Gothic Halja), whom Saxo Grammaticus calls Proserpine.
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  • He encouraged Hans Svaning to complete Saxo's history of Denmark, and Anders Vedel to translate Saxo into Danish.
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  • Indeed, according to Saxo, onethird of the realm was a wilderness.
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  • His fame has been somewhat obscured by that of his great minister Absalon, whom their common chronicler Saxo constantly magnifies at the expense of his master.
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  • He is the only one of Saxo's heroes in whose mouth the chronicler never puts a speech.
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  • pp. 570-670 (Copenhagen, 1897-1905); Saxo, Gesta Danorum, books to-16 (Strassburg, 1886).
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  • The main authorities for the life and reign of Lothair are: "Vita Norberti archiepiscopi Magdeburgensis"; Otto von Freising, "Chronicon Annalista Saxo" and "Narratio de electione Lotharii" all in the Monumenta Germaniae historica.
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  • Absalon first appears in Saxo's Chronicle as a fellow-guest at Roskilde, at the banquet given, in 1157, by King Sweyn to his rivals Canute and Valdemar.
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  • See Saxo, Gesta Danorum, ed.
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  • Saxo Poeta and the Quedlinburg chronicle) it was her father whom she revenged; but when the treacherous overthrow of the Burgundians by Attila had become a theme for epic poets, she figured as a Burgundian princess, and her act as done in revenge for her brothers.
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  • Among later writers much valuable information is given by Ammianus Marcellinus, Jordanes, Procopius, Gregory of Tours, Bede, Paulus Diaconus, Widukind, Thietmar, Adam of Bremen and Saxo Grammaticus, as well as by the early laws and charters.
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  • The settlement gradually became a great resort for merchants, and thus acquired the name which, in a corrupted form, it still bears, of Kaupmannahafn, Kj6bmannshavn, or Portus Mercatorum as it is translated by Saxo Grammaticus.
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  • Hrothgar and Halga correspond to Saxo's Hroar and Helgi, while Hrothwulf is the famous Rolvo or Hrolfr Kraki of Danish and Norse saga.
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  • There are numerous kings mentioned in Saxo, but it is impossible to identify them historically.
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  • The genealogy of Haraldr is given differently in Saxo, but there can be no doubt of his historical existence.
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  • This Godefridus is the Godefridus-Guthredus of Saxo, and is to be identified also with Guc rti r the Yngling, king in Vestfold in Norway.
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  • SaXO, Gesta Danorum (Strassburg, 1886); Repertorium diplomaticum regni Danici mediaevalis (Copenhagen, 1894); Ludvig Holberg, Konge og Danehof (Copenhagen, 18 95); Poul Frederik Barford, Danmarks Historic 1319-1536 (Copenhagen, 1885); ib.
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  • The great Saxo Grammaticus wrote his Historia Danica under the same patronage.
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  • He edited and published, at Paris in 1514, the Latin text of the old chronicler, Saxo Grammaticus; he worked up in their present form the beautiful halfmythical stories of Karl Magnus (Charlemagne) and Holger Danske (Ogier the Dane).
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  • He published an excellent" translation of Saxo Grammaticus in 1575.
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  • (It is worthy of notice that the same meaning is attributed to the name of Tokko, the hero of a similar legend in Gheysmer's abridgment of the Historia Danica of Saxo Grammaticus, which may, somehow, have influenced the Swiss version.) The only other known instances of the Uri version of the legend relating to the origin of the Confederation are the Latin hexameters of Glareanus (1515), in which Tell is compared to Brutus as "assertor patriae, vindex ultorque tyrannum," and the Urnerspiel (composed in 1511-12), a play acted in Uri, in which Russ's version is followed, though the bailiff, who is unnamed, but announces that he has been sent by Albert of Austria, is slain in the "hollow way."
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  • In Saxo Grammaticus's account of Ragnar Lodbrog, this event seems to be reflected in the story of an expedition of Ragnar's to Bjarmaland or Perm in Russia.
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  • So it appears in the history given by Saxo Grammaticus of the voyage to Bjarmaland of one " Gorm the old."
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  • We see then that in virtue of some quite historical misfortune to the viking invaders, connected with a mist and with a great sickness which invaded the army, the place they have come to (in reality Paris) is in Scandinavian tradition identified with the mythic Bjarmaland; and later, in the history of Saxo Grammaticus, it is identified with the geographical Bjarmaland or Perm.
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  • (Saxo Grammat., Hist.
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  • The nearest approach to it now preserved is probably the code of laws attributed to the mythic king Fr061 (the Wise) and preserved in the pages of Saxo Grammaticus.
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  • Steenstrup thinks the code cited by Saxo may be identical with the laws which Rollo promulgated for his Norman subjects.
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  • The Danish king Hrothgar and his brother Halga, the sons of Healfdene, appear in the Historia Danica of Saxo as Roe (the founder of Roskilde) and Helgo, the sons of Haldanus.
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  • There are similar alternative possibilities with regard to the explanation of the striking resemblances which certain incidents of the adventures with Grendel and the dragon bear to incidents in the narratives of Saxo and the Icelandic sagas.
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  • According to Diiben the name first occurs in the 13th century - in the Fundinn Noregr, composed about 1200, in Saxo Grammaticus, and in a papal bull of date 1230; but the people are probably to be identified with those Finns of Tacitus whom he describes as wild hunters with skins for clothing and rude huts as only means of shelter, and certainly with the Skrithiphinoi of Procopius (Goth.
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  • (e) The Dirges and Battle Songs - such as that on Hafur-firth Battle Hrafnsmal, by Thiodolf of Hvin orThorbjorn Hornklofi, shortly after 870; Eirik's Dirge (Eiriksmdl) between 950 and 969; the DartLay on Clontarf Battle (1014); Biarka-mal (fragments of which we have, and paraphrase of more is found in Hrolf Kraki's Saga and in Saxo).
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  • There are also fragments of poems in Half's Saga, Asmund KappaBana's Saga, in the Latin verses of Saxo, and the Shield Lays (Ragnarsdrapa) by Bragi, &c., of this school, which closes with the Sun-Song, a powerful Christian Dantesque poem, recalling some of the early compositions of the Irish Church, and with the 12th-century Lay of Ragnar, Lay of Starkad, The Proverb Song (Havamal) and Krakumal, to which we may add those singular Gloss-poems, the Pulur, which also belong to the Western Isles.
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  • The earlier part of it has perished save a fragment Sogu-brot, and citations and paraphrases in Saxo, and the mythical Ragnar Lodbrok's and Gongu-Hrolf's Sagas; the latter part, Lives of Harold Bluetooth and the Kings down to Sveyn II., is still in existence and known as Skioldunga.
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  • The tale is told with variations by Saxo Grammaticus (Historic Danica, ed.
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  • They are first mentioned by Saxo Grammaticus in connexion with the exile of Knud V.
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  • Saxo recognized that they were of Frisian origin, but did not know when they had first settled in this region.
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  • It is celebrated as the Elsinore of Shakespeare's tragedy of Hamlet, and was the birthplace of Saxo Grammaticus, from whose history the story of Hamlet is derived.
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  • The story of his death is given in two widely different forms, by Saxo in his Gesta Danorum (ed Holder, pp. 69 ff.) and in the prose Edda (Gylfaginning, cap. 49).
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  • and iv.; Ynglinga Saga, with the poem Ynglingatal contained in the Heimskringla; Olafs Sagan Tryggvasonar and Olafs Saga hins Helga, both contained in Heimskringla and in Fornmanna sogur; Saxo grammaticus, gesta Danorum; a collection of later Swedish Chronicles contained in Rerum suecicarum scriptores, vol.
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  • Grimm, in Die deutsche Heldensage (2nd ed., Berlin, 1867), quotes the account given by Jordanes, references in Beowulf, in the Wanderer's Song, Exeter Book, in Parcival, in Dietrichs Flucht, the account given in the Quedlinburg Chronicle, by Ekkehard in the Chronicon Urspergense, by Saxo Grammaticus, &c. See also Vigfusson and Powell, Corpus poeticum boreale, vol.
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