Samech sentence example

samech
  • There are twenty-nine letters, one more than in Arabic, Samech and Sin being distinct forms, as in Hebrew.
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  • These are: (a) how Greek utilized the four sibilants (Shin, Samech, Zain and Zade), which it took over from the Phoenician; (b) what was the history of development in the symbols for cl), x, 4', w (the history of E belongs to both heads); (c) the history of the symbol for the digamma F.
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  • In the Phoenician alphabet Zain was the seventh letter, occupying the same position and having the same form approximately (i) as the early Greek Z, while in pronunciation it was a voiced s-sound; Samech () followed the 'symbol for n of and was the ordinary s-sound, though, as we have seen, e it is in different Greek states at the earliest period as well as E; after the symbol for p came Zade (v), which was a strong palatal s, though in name it corresponds to the Greek Nra; while lastly Shin (W) follows the symbol for r, and was an sh-sound.
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  • The Greek name for the sibilant (clyFca) may simply mean the hissing letter and be a derivative from vi j"co; many authorities, however, hold that it is a corruption of the Phoenician Samech.
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  • The confusion is thus extreme: the name Zade assimilated in Greek to the names ajra and B41ra becomes slira, though the form is that of Zain; the name of Samech is possibly the origin of Sigma, while the form of Samech is that of = which has not taken over a Phoenician name.
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  • century, and was soon given up. As the Ionians kept the form which the people of Thera used for ?, in the same position in their alphabet as Samech occupied in the Phoenician alphabet, there can be no doubt as to its origin.
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  • which the Chalcidian Greeks used in the 6th century B.C. for may be derived, according to the most widely accepted theory, from a primitive form of Samech, which is recorded only in the abecedaria of the Chalcidian colonies in Italy.
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  • The variation may have been one of local use, either in Judea or in Babylonia; or the author may have had some fanciful reason for the transposition, such as, for example, that Pe following Samech (mo) might suggest the word nmo, " Wail ye!
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