Samanid sentence example

samanid
  • ibn Mansur, the Samanid amir of Bokhara.
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  • The Samanid dynasty came to its end in December 1004.
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  • Yakub's family did not continue long in power; but the Samanid princes who succeeded applied themselves zealously to the same work, and Prince Nuh II., who came to the throne in 365 A.H.
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  • Nub (999), under whom the Samanid dynasty was conquered by the Ghaznevids.
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  • of Asia, and were brought, through Russian caravans, even so far as to Pomerania, Sweden and Norway, where Samanid coins have been found in great number, were in their turn overthrown by a more youthful and vigorous race, that of Sabuktagin, which founded the illustrious Ghaznevid dynasty and the Mussulman empire of India.
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  • In 994 Mahmud was made governor of Khorasan, with the title of Saif addaula (ud-daula) ("Sword of the State") by thee Samanid Nuh II.
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  • Previously the name of the Samanid sovereign, Mansur II.
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  • His description of some medals struck by the Samanid and Bouid princes (1804) was composed in Arabic because he had no Latin types.
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  • Ahmed the Samanid.
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  • Ahmad, the Samanid, and the Saffarids were henceforward a merely nomiSamanids.
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  • The first of the house was Aiptagin, a Turkish slave of the Samanid Mansur I., who, having quarrelled with his master, took refuge in Afghanistan and founded a semi-independent authority.
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  • After his death three unimportant governors of his house held sway, but in 977 the power fell to another former slave, Sabuktagin, who was recognized by the Samanid Nith II.
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  • Shortly after commencing this work Dal~il~l was murdered in the prime of life; his death was soon followed by the fall of the Samanid dynasty itself.
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  • Nuh of the Samanid dynasty of Bokhara, early brought himself to notice (see Samanids).
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  • But Sabuktagin, throughout his reign at Ghazni, continued to acknowledge the Samanid suzerainty, as did Mahmud also, until the time, soon after succeeding to his father's dominions, when he received from Qadir, caliph of Bagdad (see Caliphate, C. § 25), a khilat (robe of honour), with a letter recognizing his sovereignty, and conferring on him the titles Yamin-addaula (" Right hand of the State"), and Amin-ulMillat (" Guardian of the Faith").
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