Rbcs sentence example

rbcs
  • Blood is made up of red blood cells (RBCs), which carry oxygen and other materials to all tissues of the body; white blood cells (WBCs), which fight infection; and platelets, which play a part in the clotting of the blood.
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  • These stem cells mature through stages into RBCs, WBCs, or platelets.
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  • While not normally found in CSF, RBCs will appear whenever bleeding has occurred.
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  • This is accomplished by counting RBCs and WBCs in both blood and CSF.
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  • The ratio of RBCs in CSF to blood is multiplied by the blood WBC count.
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  • Anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally low levels of healthy red blood cells (RBCs) or reduced hemoglobin (Hgb), the iron-bearing protein in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to tissues throughout the body.
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  • As RBCs break down, they release Hgb into the blood stream, which is normally filtered out by the kidneys and excreted.
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  • The iron released from the RBCs is returned to the bone marrow to help create new cells.
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  • It is characterized by RBCs that are larger than normal and is caused by a deficiency of folic acid, a vitamin that the body needs to produce normal cells and normal DNA.
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  • Necessary for the creation of healthy RBCs, B12 is found in meat, eggs, whole grains, and most vegetables.
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  • It is the result of either infection or the presence of antibodies that destroy RBCs more rapidly than bone marrow can replace them.
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  • The antibodies are produced as an immune response to what the body views as foreign antigens on the surface of the infant's RBCs.
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  • It is characterized by low hemoglobin and unusually small and fragile RBCs (microcytosis), although the RBC count may be normal.
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  • The condition is characterized by abnormal, crescent-shaped RBCs.
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  • Chronic liver failure generally produces the most severe symptoms because the production of RBCs is directly affected.
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  • Gradual blood loss is less threatening, because the body has time to replace RBCs and blood volume.
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  • The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) will be measured to compare the size of RBCs with normal RBCs.
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  • A reticulocyte (young RBCs) count will help determine if anemia is caused by impaired RBC production or increased RBC destruction.
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  • Thalassemia major may be treated with regular transfusions, surgical resection of the spleen to avoid its removal of RBCs from circulation, and sometimes iron chelation therapy.
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  • Individuals who do not respond to medical therapy, may undergo surgery to remove the spleen, which controls the anemia in some individuals by helping to add more RBCs to the circulation.
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  • This type of anemia is caused by deficient erythropoiesis, the ongoing process of the bone marrow to produce healthy red blood cells (RBCs).
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  • It is characterized by the production of small (microcytic) RBCs.
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  • When examined under a microscope, the RBCs also appear pale or light colored from the absence of heme, the major component of hemoglobin, which is the iron-bearing protein and coloring pigment in RBCs.
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  • Anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally low levels of healthy RBCs or reduced levels of hemoglobin (Hgb), the iron-bearing protein in RBCs that delivers oxygen to tissues throughout the body.
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  • Iron is an essential component of the production of healthy RBCs, and iron stores must be maintained for the ongoing production of RBCs by the bone marrow.
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  • These symptoms result because of the reduced oxygen carrying capacity of RBCs and the reduced ability of the RBCs to carry iron to working muscles.
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  • Diagnostic testing starts with a complete blood count (CBC) and differential, counting RBCs, white blood cells (WBCs) and measuring hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), and other factors.
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  • A reticulocyte (young RBCs) count will help determine if anemia is caused by impaired RBC production, as in iron deficiency anemia, or increased RBC destruction as in some other types of anemia.
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  • The goal of treatment for iron deficiency anemia is to restore iron levels and the production of healthy RBCs and increase the essential flow of oxygen to tissues.
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  • The average concentration of hemoglobin in the RBCs expressed as a percent.
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  • The MCV is an index of the size of the RBCs.
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  • When the MCV is below normal, the RBCs will be smaller than normal and are described as microcytic.
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  • When the MCV is elevated, the RBCs will be larger than normal and are termed macrocytic.
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  • Plasma trapped between the RBCs tends to cause an increase in the hematocrit, giving rise to a somewhat higher MCV and lower MCHC.
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  • Red blood cells (RBCs) from the fetus leak across the placenta and enter the woman's circulation throughout pregnancy with the greatest transfer occurring at delivery.
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  • In succeeding pregnancies, the antibodies reach the fetus via the placenta and destroy (lyse) the fetal RBCs.
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  • Reacting to the anemia, the fetal bone marrow may release immature RBCs, or erythroblasts, into the fetal peripheral circulation, causing erythroblastosis fetalis.
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  • Red blood cells (RBCs) carry several types of proteins, called antigens, on their surfaces.
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  • The anti-Rh antibodies from the preparation destroy fetal RBCs in the mother's blood before they can sensitize the maternal immune system.
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  • All newborn infants begin to destroy fetal red blood cells (RBCs) in their first few days of life, replacing them with new red blood cells.
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