Pronoun sentence example

pronoun
  • The possessive pronoun follows the object.
    405
    124
  • In English the third person singular pronoun is he, she or it.
    169
    110
  • When a noun comes first, it is followed by a relative pronoun, thus, Dafydd a brynodd lyfr yno, which really means " (it is) David who bought a book there," and is never used in any other sense in the spoken language, though in literary Welsh it is used rhetorically for the simple statement which is properly expressed by putting the verb first.
    75
    55
  • A relative pronoun immediately precedes its verb and can only be separated from it by an infixed pronoun, thus Dafydd a'i prynodd, " (it is) David who bought it," yno y'm gweli, " (it is) there that thou wilt see me."
    59
    41
  • At times a noun can be replaced with a pronoun.
    10
    4
    Advertisement
  • "Watch your pronoun, we," I answered as I struggled up the slope.
    8
    3
  • Be careful to use a singular pronoun with a singular noun in your writing.
    7
    2
  • Quien, the interrogative pronoun which has taken the place of the old qul, seems to come from q u e rn.
    29
    25
  • As Mommsen remarks, the clauses of the sentences are often arranged on the thread of the relative pronoun like thrushes on a string.
    32
    29
  • Listen to the words— 'smoke and whiskey breath of those who visited here' and look at the pronoun.
    5
    2
    Advertisement
  • Dean ignored the pronoun we.
    6
    3
  • Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.
    6
    3
  • Obviously, the semantics of such anaphoric pronouns is very simple: the referent of the anaphoric pronoun is the referent of the anaphoric pronoun is the referent of its antecedent.
    5
    2
  • Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.
    6
    3
  • Self-reference is unambiguous and there is no motivation to depart from Gricean norms by including the pronoun yo.
    6
    3
    Advertisement
  • Then there is no relative pronoun, and the resulting complication seems great to an English-speaking person, as the following illustration will show: -
    6
    3
  • Listen to the words— 'smoke and whiskey breath of those who visited here' and look at the pronoun.
    6
    4
  • All tenses of reflexive verbs except the imperative and present participle are formed by prefixing the pronoun which indicates the object to the verb, in the dative or genitive case (abbreviated) as the verb may require; but in the reflexive imperative and present participle the verb precedes the pronoun; e.g.
    4
    2
  • Lay the stress upon the pronoun, Lo, I come.
    4
    2
  • Some verbs naturally require a reflexive pronoun; for instance, to kill onself.
    4
    3
    Advertisement
  • Obviously, the semantics of such anaphoric pronouns is very simple: the referent of the anaphoric pronoun is the referent of its antecedent.
    4
    3
  • Thus, in Fijian the word luve means either a son or a daughter - one s own child, and it takes the possessive pronoun suffixed, as luvena; but the word ngone, a child, but not necessarily one's own child, takes the possessive pronoun before it, as nona ngone, his child, i.e.
    22
    23
  • It is never preserved except when protected by the non-etymological I already spoken of (lie girt or llegt, but never liegsn); the r reappears, nevertheless, whenever the infinitive is followed by a pronoun (donarme, d-irho).
    43
    44
  • Finally, for stylistic reasons I have used the male personal pronoun throughout.
    4
    5
  • The suffix-article likewise appears in Rumanian and Bulgarian, but in no other Latin or Slavonic language; it is in each case a form of the demonstrative pronoun.
    4
    4
    Advertisement
  • Another absolute pronoun of the first person is ink, .JtOK, like Heb.
    4
    4
  • Navarrese-Aragonese makes use of the adverb en as a pronoun: no les en daren pas, non hi ha.
    4
    4
  • Trying a different tack she said, " Johnny, give me a sentence with the pronoun, " I " in it.
    4
    5
  • In French, the owner of the hair that is expressed with the reflexive pronoun that comes before the verb.
    4
    5
  • The first two exercises: Reflexive Pronouns and Reflexive Pronouns and Verbs enable students to learn to associate the French subject pronouns with the proper reflexive pronoun and the correct verb form.
    3
    4
    Advertisement
  • A final check is to match the subject pronoun to the reflexive pronoun and verb, followed by the rest of the sentence; the end result is a complete, grammatical, sentence in which the reflexive verb is used correctly.
    3
    4
  • Je is the pronoun for 'I', and tu is the pronoun for you.
    3
    4
  • This would produce the phrase: "Je tu aime," but there is another problem with this phrase, which is that because the pronoun tu ends with a vowel and the verb aimer starts with a vowel, the pronoun tu elides with the verb.
    4
    4
  • The verb does not agree with its subject unless the latter is a personal pronoun; when the subject is a noun the verb is put in the third person singular; thus carant, " they love," can take a pronominal subject - carant hwy, " they love "; but " the men love " is car y dynion (not carant y dynion, which can only mean " they love the men ").
    26
    29
  • Pronouns are numerous, and the personal pronoun includes four numbers - singular, dual, trinal and general plural, also inclusive and exclusive.
    18
    21
    Advertisement
  • This classification is based on the form, varying in different localities, of the pronoun ca, sto, or kaj, meaning "what."
    18
    21
  • The plural of the first and second personal pronoun has in the modern language taken a composite formnosoiros, vosotroswhich has been imitated in Catalan.
    15
    18
  • As regards the pronoun, mention must be made of the non-etymological forms of the personal rn/rn and of the feminine possessive minha, where the second n has been brought in by the initial nasal.
    9
    13
  • In addressing chiefs, or others to whom one wishes to be respectful, the singular number of the personal pronoun is rarely used; the dual is employed instead, - the dual of dignity or of respect.
    28
    33
  • In the third example it would be the interrogative pronoun "was."
    36
    42
    Advertisement