Pittsburg sentence example

pittsburg
  • I took a deep breath and randomly chose a Pittsburg number.
    0
    0
  • It is the carrier of a heavy tonnage of coal to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.
    0
    0
  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.
    0
    0
  • The United Presbyterian Church has two seminaries, one at Xenia, Ohio, and one at Allegheny (Pittsburg).
    0
    0
  • Of the Covenanter bodies the synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church has a theological seminary in Allegheny (Pittsburg), established in 1856, and the general synod in 1887 organized a college at Cedarville, Ohio.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Philadelphia is the home of the boards of publication and of Sunday schools of the Northern Church; and in Allegheny (Pittsburg) are the principal theological seminary of the United Presbyterian body and its publishing house.
    0
    0
  • Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Ohio, the Ohio Central, the Norfolk & Western, the Hocking Valley, and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus (Pennsylvania system) railways, and by nine interurban electric lines.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central System), the Lake Erie & Western (New York Central System), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania System) and the Vandalia (Pennsylvania System) railways.
    0
    0
  • San Francisco spent more in new permanent structures than Philadelphia, and Seattle spent more than Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Parkersburg is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, and the Little Kanawha railways, by electric railway to Marietta, Ohio, and by passenger and freight boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati, intermediate ports, and ports on the Little Kanawha.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The city is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and is connected with Indianapolis and with Louisville, Ky., by an electric interurban line.
    0
    0
  • It descended the Ohio and Mississippi from Pittsburg, whence there had already been a thriving river trade to New Orleans for about thirty years.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville, the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by the Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern and the Ohio electric interurban railways.
    0
    0
  • McKees Rocks is served by the Pittsburg & Lake Erie and the Pittsburg, Chartiers & Youghiogheny railways, the latter a short line extending (13 m.) to Beechmont.
    0
    0
  • Warsaw is served by the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago (Pennsylvania system) and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by interurban electric lines.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is served by the Central Indiana, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pittsburg, Chicago & St Louis railways, and also by the Indiana Union Traction System (electric), the general offices and central power plant of which are situated there.
    0
    0
  • Tarentum is served by the Pennsylvania railway and by an electric line connecting with Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Cincinnati, Dayton and Toledo.
    0
    0
  • Dayton is served by the Erie, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Dayton & Union railways, by ten interurban electric railways, centring here, and by the Miami & Erie canaL The city extends more than 5 m.
    0
    0
  • After acting for a short time as assistant in Harvard College Observatory, he was appointed assistant professor of mathematics in the U.S. Naval Academy in 1866, and in the following year became director of the Allegheny Observatory at Pittsburg, a position which he held until his selection in 1887 as secretary of the Smithsonian.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The borough is served by the Pennsylvania and the Pittsburg & Lake Erie railways.
    0
    0
  • He was soon re-employed in a minor position, and, at the head of a division of new troops, accompanied Grant's army to Pittsburg Landing.
    0
    0
  • In view of operations against Corinth, Mississippi, Grant's army had ascended the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing and there disembarked, while the co-operating army under Buell moved across country from Nashville to join it.
    0
    0
  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Erie, and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railways, and is connected with Olean, New York, by an electric line.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the first year of the war (1755) expeditions set out against Fort Duquesne (on the site of Pittsburg) and Fort Niagara and Crown Point, on the New York frontier.
    0
    0
  • Fossil remains of mammals, fish and reptiles found in the Tertiary deposits of south-western Montana are preserved in the Carnegie Museum at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and in the museum of the university of Montana.
    0
    0
  • But this was only a preliminary to the success attending his development of the iron and steel industries at Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • He gave £2,000,000 in 1901 to start the Carnegie Institute at Pittsburg, and the same amount (1902) to found the Carnegie Institution at Washington, and in both of these, and other, cases he added later to the original endowment.
    0
    0
  • The more important railway lines are the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (controlled by the Pennsylvania and a consolidation of the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore, and the Baltimore & Potomac), the Western Maryland, the West Virginia Central & Pittsburg (leased by the Western Maryland), the Northern Central, the Maryland electric railways (including what was formerly the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line), and the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis electric railway.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Four outlying groups beyond the mountains, with perhaps a twentieth part of the total population of the nation, one about Pittsburg, one in West Virginia, another in northern Kentucky, and the last in.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Pittsburg, Ft Wayne & Chicago Division), the Baltimore & Ohio and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways.
    0
    0
  • The dairy business is largest in the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburg, and in Erie and Bradford counties.
    0
    0
  • A large portion of the vegetables are grown in the vicinity of Philadelphia or in the vicinity of Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • The Pittsburg district, comprising the counties of Allegheny, Washington, Fayette and Westmoreland, is exceptionally productive, and the coal in Allegheny and Washington counties is noted for its gas-producing qualities, while in Fayette and Westmoreland counties is obtained the famous Connellsville coking coal.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The bituminous coal was first used at nearly the same time as the anthracite and it was first shipped from Pittsburg in 1803.
    0
    0
  • So long as charcoal only was used in the furnaces (until about 1840) and during the brief period in which this was replaced largely by anthracite, the industry was of chief importance in the eastern section, but with the gradual increase in the use of bituminous coal, or of coke made from it, the industry moved westward, where, especially in the Pittsburg district, it received a new impetus by The introduction of iron ore from the Lake Superior region.
    0
    0
  • Nearly 20% of the iron and steel was produced by Pittsburg together with Allegheny,with which it has since been consolidated, and the production of these is the leading industry of New Castle, Johnstown, Duquesne, McKeesport, Sharon, Braddock and Dubois, also in the west part of the state and of Reading, Harrisburg, Steelton, South Bethlehem, Pottstown, Lebanon, Phoenixville and Danville in the east part.
    0
    0
  • In 1824 the state legislature authorized the appointment of a commission to explore routes from the Schuylkill to Pittsburg, and from the West Branch of the Susquehanna to the Allegheny, and in the three or four succeeding years the state committed itself to a very extensive system of internal improvements.
    0
    0
  • Work was begun on the system in 1826 and was continued without interruption until 1840, when the completed or nearly completed portions embraced a railway from Philadelphia to Columbia on the Susquehanna, a canal up the Susquehanna and the Juniata from Columbia to Hollidaysburg, a portage railway from Hollidaysburg through Blair's Gap in the Alleghany Front to Johnstown on the Conemaugh river, a canal down the Conemaugh, Kiskiminetas, and Allegheny rivers to Pittsburg, a canal up the Susquehanna and its west branch from the mouth of the Juniata to Farrandsville, in Clinton county, a canal up the Susquehanna and its north branch from Northumberland nearly to the New York border, and a canal up the Delaware river from Bristol to the mouth of the Lehigh; considerable work had also been done on two canals to connect the Ohio river with Lake Erie.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Federal government has much improved the navigation of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers and is committed to a project for slack-water navigation on the Ohio which is expected to give Pittsburg communication with the sea by vessels drawing 9 ft.
    0
    0
  • The principal railways are the lines operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company from New York to Washington through Philadelphia; from Philadelphia to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago and St Louis through Harrisburg and Pittsburg; from Baltimore, Maryland, to Sodus Point on Lake Ontario (Northern Central) through Harrisburg and Williamsport; from Williamsport to Buffalo and to Erie, and from Pittsburg to Buffalo; the Philadelphia & Reading; the Lehigh Valley; the Erie; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg ranks high among the interior ports of the country in foreign commerce and first among the cities of the United States in the tonnage of its domestic commerce.
    0
    0
  • The apparent object of the measure was to deprive the people of Pittsburg temporarily of the privileges of self-government by empowering the governor to appoint a recorder (in 1903 the title of mayor was again assumed) to exercise (until 1903, when the municipal executive should be again chosen by the people) the functions of the mayor, thus removed by the governor under this statute; and this act applied to the other cities of the second class, Allegheny and Scranton, although they had not offended the party managers.
    0
    0
  • A second hospital was opened at Pittsburg in 1853 (act of 1848), but the location was ruined by Pennsylvania railway improvements, and in 1862 it was removed to a new site about 7 m.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There are theological seminaries at Pittsburg, the Allegheny Seminary (United Presbyterian, 1825), Reformed Presbyterian (1856), and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, 1827); at Lancaster (German Reformed, 1827); at Meadville (Unitarian, 18 44); at Bethlehem (Moravian, 1807); at Chester, the Crozer Theological Seminary (Baptist, 1868); at Gettysburg (Lutheran, 1826); and in Philadelphia several schools, notably the Protestant Episcopal Church divinity school (1862) and a Lutheran seminary (1864), at Mount Airy.
    0
    0
  • There are many technical and special schools, such as Girard College, Drexel institute and Franklin institute at Philadelphia, the Carnegie institute at Pittsburg and the United States Indian school at Carlisle (1891).
    0
    0
  • The railway riots of 1877, which centred at Pittsburg and Reading, resulted in the destruction of about two thousand freight cars and a considerable amount of other property.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis and the Cincinnati Northern railways, and by interurban electric railways.
    0
    0
  • By 1888 Hall was at work on a commercial scale at Pittsburg, reducing German alumina; in 1891 the plant was removed to New Kensington for economy in fuel, and was gradually enlarged to 150o h.p.; in 1894 a factory driven by water was erected at Niagara Falls, and subsequently works were established at Shawenegan in Canada and at Massena in the United States.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Pittsburg and Lake Erie, and the Baltimore & Ohio railways, and by the interurban electric system of the West Penn Railway Co., which has a large power plant near Connellsville.
    0
    0
  • Pop. (1890) 40,634; (1900) 5 2, 733, of whom 11,957 were foreign-born, including 5226 from Germany and 1468 from Ireland, and 26,797 were of foreign parentage (both parents foreign-born), including 13,316 of German parentage and 4203 of Irish parentage; (1906, estimate) 59993 Erie is served by the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Erie & Pittsburg (Pennsylvania Company), the Philadelphia & Erie (Pennsylvania railway), and the Bessemer & Lake Erie railways, and by steamboat lines to many important lake ports.
    0
    0
  • In February 1856 he was a member of the Pittsburg convention which led to the organization of the national Republican party, and in the same year he was a candidate for governor of Indiana; he was defeated, but his campaign resulted in the effective organization of the new party in his state.
    0
    0
  • Allegheny is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Pittsburg & Western railways, by the Pittsburg, Ft.
    0
    0
  • Six bridges spanning the river and electric lines crossing them have brought Allegheny into close industrial and social relations with the main part of Pittsburg, and on the hills of Allegheny are beautiful homes of wealthy men.
    0
    0
  • As a manufacturing centre Allegheny was outranked in 1905 by only two cities in the state - Philadelphia and Pittsburg; among the more important of its large variety of manufactures are the products of slaughtering and meat-packing establishments, iron and steel rolling mills, the products of foundries and machineshops, pickles, preserves and sauces, the products of railwayconstruction and repair shops, locomotives, structural iron and plumbers' supplies.
    0
    0
  • Allegheny was laid out in 1788 on a portion of a tract which the state had previously reserved opposite Pittsburg, with a view to bringing some valuable land into the market for the payment of its soldiers' claims. When ordered by the state to be laid out, it was also named as the site of the county-seat of the newly erected county of Allegheny, but the opposition of Pittsburg was so strong that by a supplementary act in the following year that town was made the county-seat.
    0
    0
  • In 1906 the question of uniting Allegheny with Pittsburg under one municipal government was submitted to a joint vote of the electorate of the two cities, in accordance with an act of the state legislature, which had been passed in February of that year, and a large majority voted for the union; but there was determined opposition in Allegheny, every ward of the city voting in the negative; the constitutionality of the act was challenged; the supreme court of the state on the 11th of March 1907 declared the act valid, and on the 18th of November 1907 this decision was affirmed by the Supreme Court of the United States.
    0
    0
  • He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1819 and practised law in Pittsburg from 1822 to 1826, when he removed to Mississippi.
    0
    0
  • Salem is served by the Pennsylvania (the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago division) and the Youngstown & Ohio River railways, and by an interurban electric line to Canton.
    0
    0
  • In 1847 he removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he took a leading place at the bar.
    0
    0
  • The city is served by the Pennsylvania, the Erie, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, and the Dunkirk, Allegheny Valley & Pittsburg railways, by the electric line of the Buffalo & Lake Erie Traction Co., and by several lines of freight and passenger steamships.
    0
    0
  • Here in 1755 General Braddock prepared for his disastrous expedition against the French at Fort Duquesne (Pittsburg).
    0
    0
  • He was pastor of the Liberty Street Church of Pittsburg in 1835, and of a church at Williamsport (now Monongahela) in 1836.
    0
    0
  • Madison is served by the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railroad and by river steamboats.
    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of the State Manual Training Normal School (1903) and of the Pittsburg Business College.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg is situated near the lead and zinc region of south-east Kansas and south-west Missouri, is in the midst of a large and rich bituminous coalfield, and lies near natural gas and oil fields.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg was settled about 187 9, was chartered as a city in 1880, and became a city of the first class in 1908.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Pittsburg & Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania railways.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash system), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), and the Pennsylvania railways, and by inter-urban electric railways.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, South-Western (which has repair shops here), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Southern Indiana railways, and by the Indianapolis, Columbus & Southern and the Indianapolis & Louisville interurban electric lines.
    0
    0
  • In 1815 Gallitzin was suggested for the bishopric of Bardstown, Kentucky, and in 1827 for the proposed see of Pittsburg, and he refused the bishopric of Cincinnati.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, by an electric line to Wheeling, and by boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati and intermediate ports.
    0
    0
  • It is a post-station of Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Newark is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
    0
    0
  • Washington is served by the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio, the Chartiers Valley branch of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system) and the Waynesburg & Washington railways and a connecting line for freight service, and by electric railway to Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Factories extend for miles along the banks of all three rivers into the tributary valleys, and are the cause of Pittsburg's nickname, " The Smoky City."
    0
    0
  • Although Allegheny is now a part of Pittsburg, the two public school systems remain independent.
    0
    0
  • The Pittsburg High School (five buildings in 1 9 10) has a normal course; and there are various private schools and academies.
    0
    0
  • The Pittsburg Gazette-Times is probably the oldest newspaper west of the Alleghany Mountains; the Gazette was founded in 1786 and in 1 9 06 was consolidated with the Times (1879).
    0
    0
  • In Pittsburg is the publishing house of the United Presbyterian Church, and The Christian Advocate (weekly, Methodist Episcopal, 1834) is published here under the auspices of the general conference.
    0
    0
  • Among other charitable institutions are the Curtis Home (1894) for destitute women and girls, the Bethesda Home (1890) for homeless girls and their children, the Florence Crittenton Home (1893) for homeless and unfortunate women, the Roselia Foundling Asylum and Maternity Hospital (1891), the Protestant Home for Incurables (1883), the Pittsburg Newsboys' Home (1894), the Children's Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania, the Pittsburg Association for the Improvement of the Poor and the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg is in the midst of the most productive coalfields in the country; the region is also rich in petroleum and natural gas.
    0
    0
  • The Monongahela from Pittsburg to the West Virginia state line (91.5 m.) was improved in 1836 sqq.
    0
    0
  • A ship canal to provide water communication between Pittsburg and Lake Erie has been projected.
    0
    0
  • The railways have a heavy tonnage of coal, coke and iron and steel products, and a large portion of the iron ore that is produced in the Lake Superior region is brought to Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg is also a port of entry; in 1907 the value of its imports amounted to $2,416,367, and in 1909 to $2,062,162.
    0
    0
  • In the manufacture of iron and steel products Pittsburg ranks first among the cities of the United States, the value of these products amounting in 1905 to $88,250,805 or 53.3% of the total for all manufactures; if the manufactures of Allegheny be added they amounted to $9 2, 939, 860 or 43.7%.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 the value of Pittsburg's foundry and machine shop-products was $9,631,514; of the product of steam railway repair shops, $3,726,990 (being 424.8% more than in 1900); of malt liquors, $3,166,829; of slaughtering and meat-packing products, $2,732,027; of cigars and cigarettes, $2,297,228; of glass, $2,130,540; and of tin and terne plate, $1,645,570.
    0
    0
  • In Pittsburg or the immediate vicinity are the more important plants of the United States Steel Corporation, including that of the Carnegie Company.
    0
    0
  • The Pittsburg charter of 1816 vested the more important powers of the city government in a common council of 15 members and a select council of 9 members, and until 1834 the mayor was appointed annually by these city councils from their own number.
    0
    0
  • By the Wallace Act of the state legislature in 1874 a form of government was provided for cities of three classes, and Pittsburg became a city of the second class (population between 10o,000 and 300,000); under the act of 1895 a new classification was made, under which Pittsburg remains in the second class.
    0
    0
  • The water-supply of Pittsburg is taken from the Allegheny river and pumped into reservoirs, the highest of which, in Highland Park, is 367 ft.
    0
    0
  • Pittsburg owed its origin to the strategic value of its site in the struggle between the English and the French for the possession of the North American continent.
    0
    0
  • He reached the present site of Pittsburg on the 24th of November 1 753, and subsequently reported' that what is now called " The Point," i.e.
    0
    0
  • According to one account, he visited the site of Pittsburg, and examined its availability for fortification, in August 1 753 - before the arrival of Washington.
    0
    0
  • In the following April Connolly took forcible possession of the court-house at Hanna's Town (near the present Greensburg), the county-seat of Westmoreland county (which then included the Fort Pitt region), a few days afterwards arrested the three justices who lived in Pittsburg, and for the remainder of the year terrorized the settlement.
    0
    0
  • The defenders of the property (who included a squad of soldiers from the garrison at Pittsburg) killed two and wounded several of the attacking party, but they were finally forced to surrender, and General Neville's mansion and other buildings were burned to the ground.
    0
    0
  • A mass meeting of about 5000 citizens of the above-mentioned counties (many of them armed militiamen), at Braddock's Field, on the 1st and 2nd of August 1794, threatened to take possession of Fort Lafayette and to burn Pittsburg, but cooler counsel prevailed, and after voting to proscribe several persons, and marching in a body through the streets of the town, the crowd dispersed without doing any damage.
    0
    0
  • Upon the arrival in the following November of the troops sent by President Washington, a military court of inquiry, held at Pittsburg, caused the arrest of several persons, who were sent to Philadelphia for trial, where some of them were found guilty and sentenced to terms of imprisonment, but the sentences were not enforced.
    0
    0
  • Their goods were carried in Conestoga wagons to Shippensburg and Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and Hagerstown, Maryland, taken from there to Pittsburg on pack horses, and exchanged for Pittsburg products; these products were carried by boat to New Orleans, where they were exchanged for sugar, molasses, &c., and these were carried through the gulf and along the coast to Baltimore and Philadelphia.
    0
    0
  • Boat-building was begun in Pittsburg in 1797 or earlier; the galley " President Adams," built by the government, was launched here in 1798, and the " Senator Ross," completed in the same year, was launched in 1799.
    0
    0
  • In 1797 glassworks which were the first to use coal as a fuel in making glass were built here; later Pittsburg profited greatly by the use of its great store of natural gas in the manufacture of glass.
    0
    0
  • The commercial importance of the city was increased by the canal from Pittsburg to Philadelphia, built by the state in 1834.
    0
    0
  • The first petroleum pipe line reached Pittsburg in 1875.
    0
    0
  • A movement to consolidate the cities of Pittsburg and Allegheny, together with some adjacent boroughs, was begun in 1853-1854.
    0
    0
  • Kellogg (ed.), The Pittsburg Survey (6 vols., New York, 1910 sqq.), prepared under the direction of the Sage Foundation.
    0
    0
  • More iron ore is received at this port annually than at any other port in the country, or, probably, in the world; the ore is shipped thence by rail to Pittsburg, Youngstown and other iron manufacturing centres.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Cleveland & Pittsburg Division), the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash System) railways, and by several steamboat lines.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Pittsburg, Ft Wayne & Chicago division), the Erie, and the Baltimore & Ohio railways.
    0
    0
  • The life of all of these save the last two goes back to Territorial days; but the importance of Fort Scott, like that of Galena and Pittsburg, is due to the development of the mineral counties in the southeast.
    0
    0
  • In1906-1907a fresh crusade to enforce the law was begun by the attorney-general, who brought ouster suits against the mayors of Wichita, Junction City, Pittsburg and Leavenworth for not enforcing the law and for replacing it with the " fine " system, which was merely an irregular licence.
    0
    0
  • The Rev. William Hazlitt (father of the essayist and critic), visiting the United States in 1783-1785, published the fact that there were Unitarians in Philadelphia, Boston, Charleston, Pittsburg, Hallowell, on Cape Cod and elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • He settled in Pittsburg, where he continued in private practice, with the exception of two years' service (1876-1877) as assistant United States district attorney, acquiring a large practice as a corporation lawyer.
    0
    0
  • The city is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Louisville, Henderson & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Chicago, Indiana & Louisville, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Southern and the Louisville & Nashville railways; by steamboat lines to Memphis, Cairo, Evansville, Cincinnati and Pittsburg; by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines; and by ferries to Jeffersonville and New Albany, Indiana, two attractive residential suburbs.
    0
    0
  • In 1848 he actively supported Martin van Buren, the Free Soil candidate, for the presidency, and in 1852 he supported Franklin Pierce, but soon afterwards helped to organize the new Republican party, and presided at its preliminary convention at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in February 1856.
    0
    0
  • After some months of preparation, in which he was hampered by administrative confusion and want of resources, he took the field with a picked column, in which George Washington served as a volunteer officer, intended to attack Fort Duquesne (Pittsburg, Pa.).
    0
    0
  • Warren is served by the Pennsylvania and the Dunkirk, Allegheny Valley & Pittsburg railways, and by electric railway to Jamestown, New York.
    0
    0
  • As a decorative artist his work may be seen at Trinity Church, Boston; the Bank of Pittsburg; and the Capitol at St Paul, Minnesota.
    0
    0
  • Though this matter had been discussed for some years, it was only in 1904 that the first plant was put to work at Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • A little later, considerable quantities of this iron were shipped and marketed at Pittsburg.
    0
    0
  • Grant next ascended the Tennessee river to Pittsburg Landing with the intention of capturing the Memphis & Charleston railway, and on the 6th-7th of April defeated the Confederates in the battle of Shiloh.
    0
    0
  • J., founded in 1812 by the General Assembly; the Auburn Theological Seminary at Auburn, N.Y., founded in 1819 by the synod of Geneva, and afterwards associated with the New School; a school at Hampden Sidney, Virginia, founded by the synod of Virginia in 1824, named Union Theological Seminary in Virginia after 1826, supported after 1828 by the synods of Virginia and North Carolina, and in 1898 removed to Richmond, Va.; the Western Theological Seminary, founded at Allegheny (Pittsburg), Pa., in 1827 by the General Assembly; the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina, founded in 1828 by the synod of South Carolina; Lane Theological Seminary, founded independently in 1829 by the New School at Cincinnati, Ohio; and Union Theological Seminary, founded in 1836 by independent action of New School men, in New York City.
    0
    0
  • Of this cession the part which lay in Pennsylvania was secured by purchase from the Indians for the proprietors Richard and Thomas Penn (see Pittsburg).
    0
    0
  • There are institutes for the blind at Overbrook and Pittsburg, and for the deaf and dumb at Philadelphia and Edgewood Park, an oral school for the deaf at Scranton, a home for the training of deaf children at Philadelphia, a soldiers' and sailors' home at Erie (1886), a soldiers' orphans' industrial school (1895) at Scotland, Franklin county, the Thaddeus.
    0
    0
  • Lambing in American Catholic Records (Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 1886, pp. 58-68); and a good bibliography by Thomas C. Middleton in The Gallitzin Memorandum Book, in American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, Researches, vol.
    0
    0
  • It failed entirely in that year but in 1867 Lawrenceville, Peebles, Collins, Liberty, Pitt and Oakland, all lying between the two rivers, were annexed to Pittsburg; in 1872 there was a further annexation of a district embracing 27 sq.
    0
    0
  • Thurston, Pittsburgh and Allegheny in the Centennial Year (Pittsburg, 1876); for a history of the various forts as such, Report of the Commission to Locate the Frontier Forts of Pennsylvania, vol.
    0
    0
  • There are large green-houses in and near Ashtabula, and quantities of lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes are raised under glass and shipped to Pittsburg and other large cities.
    0
    0
  • Berkeley College offers an Associate of Applied Science degree in interior design and the Art Institute of Pittsburg Online Division offers an Associates in Kitchen and Bath Design.
    0
    0
  • Learning Disabilities Association of America. 4156 Library Road, Pittsburg, PA 15234. (412) 341-1515.
    0
    0
  • For example, a family yearly membership to the Pittsburg Zoo costs just $75 and includes admission for two adults and all minor children in the household.
    0
    0