Piero sentence example

piero
  • He made his home with his elder brother Piero at Florence throughout the agitation of Savonarola and the invasion of Charles VIII.
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  • While Piero found refuge at Venice and Urbino, Cardinal Giovanni travelled in Germany, in the Netherlands and in France.
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  • His secretary, Piero delle Vigne, was wrongly suspected of conspiring.
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  • After Cosimo de Medicis death in 1464, the presidency of the Florentine republic passed to his son Piero, who left it in 1469 to his sons Lorenzo and Giuliano.
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  • The king of Naples was his natural enemy, and he had cause to suspect that Piero de Medici might abandon his alliance.
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  • Here he waited for a year until his companions could join him, and meanwhile he occupied himself in his usual good works, gaining several more companions and meeting Giovanni Piero Caraffa, afterwards Paul IV., who had lately founded the Theatines.
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  • On the 2nd of August of the same year, at Marciano in Val di Chiana, he won a complete victory over the Sienese and French troops under Piero Strozzi, the Florentine exile and marshal of France.
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  • The Biblioteca Mediceo-Laurenziana, founded in 1571, has its origin in the library of Cosimo de' Medici the Elder, and was enlarged by Piero, Giovanni and above all by Lorenzo the Magnificent.
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  • The leader of the parte was Piero degli Albizzi, whose chief rivals were the Ricci family.
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  • During the war the Eight had been practically rulers of the city, but now the parte Guelfa, led by Lapo da Castiglionchio and Piero degli Albizzi, attempted to reassert itself by illicit interference in the elections and by a liberal use of "admonitions "(ammonizioni).
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  • But to satisfy the people several of the grandi, including Piero degli Albizzi, were put to death, on charges of conspiracy, and many others were exiled.
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  • In 1464 Cosimo died and was succeeded, not without some opposition, by his son Piero, who was very infirm and gouty.
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  • Various plots against him were hatched, the anti Medicean faction being called the Del Poggio party because the house of its leader Luca Pitti was on a hill, while the Mediceans were called the Del Piano party because Piero's house was in the town below; the other opposition leaders were Dietisalvi Neroni and Agnolo Acciaiuoli.
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  • But Piero's unexpected energy upset the schemes of his enemies.
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  • Piero died in 1469, leaving two sons, Lorenzo (1449-1492) and Giuliano (1453-1478).
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  • The former at once assumed Magnin - the reins of government and became ruler of Florence in a way neither Cosimo nor Piero had ever attempted; he established his domination by means of balie consisting of the signory, the accoppiatori, and 240 other members, all Mediceans, to be renewed every five years (1471).
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  • He was succeeded by his son Piero, who had none of his father's capacity and made a number of political blunders.
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  • The king demanded the cession of Pisa, Leghorn and other towns, which Piero granted, but on returning to Florence on the 8th of November 1494 he found the opposition greatly strengthened and his popularity forfeited, especially when the news of his disgraceful cessions to Charles became known.
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  • The signory appointed Piero Capponi, a man of great ability and patriotism, and experienced in diplomacy, the gonfaloniere Francesco Valori, the Dominican Giorgio Vespucci, and the jurisconsult and diplomatist Domenico Bonsi, rule, 's every five years, appointed all the magistrates and Y Y PP g syndics to conduct the negotiations with the French king.
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  • When the king began to hint at the recall of Piero de' Medici, whose envoys had gained his ear, the signory ordered the citizens to be ready to fly to arms. The proposal was dropped, but Charles demanded an immense sum of money before he would leave the city; long discussions followed, and when at last he presented an insolent ultimatum the syndics refused to accept it.
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  • On his way back he passed through Florence, and, although the republic had refused to join the league, it believed itself in danger, as Piero de' Medici was in the king's train.
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  • Italy, Piero de' Medici, encouraged by the league, enlisted a number of mercenaries and marched on Florence, but the citizens, fired by Savonarola's enthusiasm, flew to arms and prepared for an energetic resistance; owing to Piero's incapacity and the exhaustion of his funds the expedition came to nothing.
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  • That same year Piero made another unsuccessful attempt on Florence.
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  • The weakness of the government becoming every day more apparent, several constitutional changes were made, and many old institutions, such as that of the podesta and capitano del popolo, were abolished; finally in 1502, in order Piero Capponi.
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  • The election fell on Piero Soderini (1448-1522), an honest public-spirited man of no particular party, demanded that it be held in Florentine territory.
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  • The next year Piero but lacking in strength of character.
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  • In Naples he fomented a conspiracy among the feudal lords, who were discontented with the centralized government established under the auspices of Frederick's chancellor, Piero della Vigna.
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  • His Apologeticus, a defence of the papal claims against the Empire, written - as is supposed - in refutation of Piero della Vigna's argument in favour of the independence of the Empire, has been lost.
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  • At Visconti's instigation Piero Gambacorti, the ruler of the moment, was treacherously assassinated by Jacopo d'Appiano, who succeeded him as tyrant of Pisa, and bequeathed the state to his son Gherardo.
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  • It was probably the noise of these sermons that caused the friar's temporary removal from Florence at the instance of Piero de' Medici.
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  • Piero de' Medici, made alliance with the Neapolitan sovereign whose kingdom was claimed by Charles.
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  • Piero Capponi's declaration that "it was time to put an end to this baby government" was the sole weapon needed to depose Piero de' Medici.
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  • Piero de' Medici's fresh attempt to re-enter Florence failed; nevertheless his followers continued their intrigues, and party spirit increased in virulence.
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  • The plague ended, Florence was plunged in fresh troubles from Medicean intrigues, and a conspiracy for the restoration of Piero was discovered.
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  • In the same year Piero Soderini was chosen gonfalonier for life, in accordance with certain changes in the constitution of the state, which were intended to bring Florence closer to the Venetian type of government.
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  • His son Piero said that he took medicine on the 10th of June which disagreed with him; and on the 22nd he died, having received the last offices of the Church.
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  • Francesco contains famous frescoes by Piero de' Franceschi, representing scenes from the legend of the Holy Cross, and others by Spinello Aretino, a pupil of Giotto.
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  • In the sacristy there is a very beautiful miniature-like painting of the "Scourging of Christ," by Piero della Francesca, and other pictures by later artists.
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  • It was at his court that Piero della Francesca wrote his celebrated work on the science of perspective, Francesco di Giorgio Martini his Trattato d'architettura (published by Saluzzo, Turin, 1841), and Giovanni Santi his poetical account of the chief artists of his time.
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  • Among these, Torquemada, Rodericus Sancius de Arevalo, Capistrano and Piero del Monte were especially active for the restoration of the papacy.
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  • Whole volumes might be devoted to the magnificent works in bronze produced by the Florentine artists of this century, works such as the baptistery gates by Ghiberti, the statues of Verrocchio, Donatello and many others, the bronze screen in Prato cathedral by Simone, brother of Donatello, in 1444-1461, and the screen and bronze ornaments of the tomb of Piero and Giovanni dei Medici in San Lorenzo, Florence, by Verrocchio, in 1472.
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  • After the usual education of a boy in grammar and elementary classical studies, his father, Piero, sent him to the universities of Ferrara and Padua, where he stayed until the year 1505.
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  • Up to the year 1857 the fame of Guicciardini as a writer, and the estimation of him as a man, depended almost entirely upon the History of Italy, and on a few ill-edited extracts from his aphorisms. At that date his representatives, the counts Piero and Luigi Guicciardini, opened their family archives, and cornmitted to Signor Giuseppe Canestrini the publication of his hitherto inedited MSS.
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  • For Humphrey's correspondence with Piero Candido Decembrio see the English Historical Review, vols.
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  • The Christian name of the father was Piero (the son of Antonio the son of Piero the son of Guido, all of whom had been men of law like their descendant).
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  • Her relations with Ser Piero da Vinci seem to have come to an end almost immediately upon the birth of their son.
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  • She was soon afterwards married to one Accattabriga di Piero del Vacca, of Vinci.
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  • Ser Piero on his part was four times married, and had by his last two wives nine sons and two daughters; but he had from the first acknowledged the boy Leonardo and brought him up in his own house, principally, no doubt, at Florence.
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  • In that city Ser Piero followed his profession with success, as notary to many of the chief families in the city, including the Medici, and afterwards to the signory or governing council of the state.
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  • His father showed some of his drawings to an acquaintance, Andrea del Verrocchio, who at once recognized the boy's artistic vocation, and was selected by Ser Piero to be his master.
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  • Again, a peasant of Vinci having in his simplicity asked Ser Piero to get a picture painted for him on a wooden shield, the father is said to have laughingly handed on the commission to his son, who thereupon shut himself up with all the noxious insects and grotesque reptiles he could find, observed and drew and dissected them assiduously, and produced at last a picture of a dragon compounded of their various shapes and aspects, which was so fierce and so life-like as to terrify all who saw it.
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  • At Florence he was at last persuaded, on the initiative of Piero Soderini, to undertake for his native city a work of painting as great as that with which he had adorned Milan.
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  • After his death Leonardo experienced unkindness from his seven half-brothers, Ser Piero's legitimate sons.
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  • Semiramis is not doing much of anything, nor are those figures of Puvis's which seem most indebted to Piero.
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  • In this year Lorenzo died, and was succeeded by his son, the vain and weak Piero; France passed beneath the personal control of the inexperienced Charles viii.
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  • The latter has other interesting pictures, including a fresco representing an apprentice with pestle and mortar (Pestapepe), the only authentic work in Forli of Melozzo da Forli (1438-1494), an eminent master whose style was formed under the influence of Piero della Francesca, and who was the master of Palmezzano; the frescoes in the Sforza chapel in SS.
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  • The expulsion of of the the Medici produced some disorder, but Piero Capponi and other prominent citizens succeeded in (1494).
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  • At the invitation of Piero Gambacorti, the ruler of the republic of Pisa, she visited that city and there endeavoured to arouse enthusiasm for the proposed crusade, urging princes and presidents, commanders and private citizens alike to join in "the holy passage."
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  • Many adherents of the late prince came over to his side, disgusted by the violence and incompetency of Piero de' Medici's rule.
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  • They were referenced in a 1451 letter from Ardouino da Baesse of Ferra to Piero di Cosimo de' Medici of Florence.
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