Photius sentence example

photius
  • The style is better than that of Socrates and Sozomen, as Photius has remarked, but as a contribution to history the work is inferior in importance.
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  • The cause of Ignatius and Photius was dealt with in the 9th century by various synods; those in the East agreeing with the emperor's view for the time being, while those in the West acted with the pope.
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  • Further information is contained in the excerpts from Ctesias by Photius; cf.
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  • The fragments in Photius and in the Apology of Pamphilus serve for comparison.
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  • The literature of succeeding centuries furnishes only isolated references; the more important are found in the scholia on Aristophanes, the lexicons of Hesychius, Photius and others, and the Etymologicum Magnum.
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  • By Eusebius and Photius he is called Titus Flavius Clemens, and " c the Alexandrian " is added to his name.
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  • Photius has also described some of them.
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  • Both Eusebius and Photius describe the work.
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  • Jerome and Photius call the work Ecclesiastical Canons, but this seems to be a mistake.
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  • Photius, probably on a careless reading of Clement, argued that he could not have believed in a real incarnation.
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  • He was a saint up till the time of Benedict XIV., who read Photius on Clement, believed him, and struck the Alexandrian's name out of the calendar.
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  • Photius ascribes their composition to Leucius Charinus therefore to the 2nd century, but Lipsius assigns it to the early decades of the 3rd.
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  • Both it and the original work are lost, with the exception of the excerpts in Photius and Suidas.
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  • Photius praises the style of Hesychius, and credits him with being a veracious historian.
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  • Pope Nicholas declared orders given by Photius of Constantinople null.
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  • It was also used by Photius (c. 867), bk.
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  • Photius and Petrus Siculus supply a few dates and events.
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  • Certain features of Paulicianism noted by Photius and Petrus Siculus are omitted in Esc. One of these is the Christhood of the fully initiated, who as such ceased to be mere "hearers" (audientes) and themselves became vehicles of the Holy Spirit.
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  • Of the Porroneioi logoi nothing remains; we have, however, an analysis in the Myriobiblion of Photius.
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  • Photius knew of nine letters by him which he called the Nine Muses; the twelve published under his name (Hercher, Epistolographi Graeci) are not genuine.
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  • He wrote also forensic speeches; Phrynichus, in Photius, ranks him amongst the best orators, and mentions his orations as the standard of the pure Attic style.
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  • It would be difficult to define very precisely the difference in French between a "conference" and a "sermon"; and the same difficulty seems to have been experienced in Greek by Photius, who says of the eloquent pulpit orations of Chrysostom, that they were oµLAiac rather than Aoyoc.
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  • From this summary (preserved in Photius's Bibliotheca) we learn that Stobaeus divided his work into four books and two volumes.
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  • In the 5th century we may place Hesychius of Alexandria, the compiler of the most extensive of our ancient Greek lexicons, and Proclus, the author of a chrestomathy, to the extracts from which (as preserved by Photius) we owe almost all our knowledge of the contents of the lost epics of early Greece.
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  • In the time of Photius the poets usually studied at school were Homer, Hesiod, Pindar; certain select plays of Aeschylus (Prometheus, Septem and Persae), Sophocles (Ajax, Electra and Oedipus Tyrannus), and Euripides (Hecuba, Orestes, Phoenissae, and, next to these, Alcestis, Andromache, Hippolytus, Medea, Rhesus, Troades,) also Aristophanes (beginning with the Plutus), Theocritus, Lycophron, and Dionysius Periegetes.
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  • One of the distinguished pupils of Photius, Arethas, bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia (c. 907-932), devoted himself with remarkable energy to collecting and expounding the Greek classics.
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  • Church became gradually more rare, the chief occasions being the question of the images in the 8th century, the quarrel between Photius and Ignatius in the 9th, the affairs of the four marriages of the emperor Leo VI.
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  • He staunchly supported the patriarch Ignatius against his rival, Photius, at Constantinople; he upheld the rights of Teutberga, who had been repudiated by her husband, Lothair II.
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  • During the religious struggles between the East and West he was on a few occasions condemned (by the Eastern council of Sardica, by Dioscorus, by Photius); but the sentences were not carried out, and were even, as in the case of Dioscorus, considered and punished as sacrilegious attacks.
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  • Eunapius and Synesius call him a Lemnian; Photius a Tyrian; his letters refer to him as an Athenian.
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  • Consequently his commentary on the epistle to the Romans, mentioned by the historian Socrates, and his epistles, mentioned by Philostorgius and Photius, are no longer extant.
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  • The rest exists only in fragments preserved in Photius and the excerpts of Constantine Porphyrogenitus.
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  • Even four centuries later, Photius, in referring to a collection of books called both Acts of Peter and the Recognition of Clement, does not make clear whether he means Homilies or Recognitions or either.
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  • Hence the charge of impiety which Photius brings against him.
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  • A further revision of this code is stated to have been made by Constantine Porphyrogenitus, the son and successor of Leo, but this statement rests only on the authority of Theodorus Balsamon, a very learned canonist of the 12th century, who, in his preface to the Nomocanon of Patriarch Photius, cites passages from the Basilica which differ from the text of the code as revised by the emperor Leo.
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  • As of old time," as Plutarch observed, " associated the heroes and snake most of all beasts with heroes," and in Photius local the term " speckled hero " thus finds an explanation.
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  • His style, modelled on that of Thucydides and unreservedly praised by Photius, is on the whole pure, though somewhat rhetorical and showing a fondness for Latinisms.
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  • Photius became captain of the guard and subsequently first imperial secretary.
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  • The dissensions between the patriarch Ignatius and Bardas, the uncle of the youthful Emperor Michael III., brought promotion to Photius.
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  • Ignatius, continuing to refuse the abdication which could alone have given Photius's elevation a semblance of legality, was treated with extreme severity.
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  • Photius felt himself the champion of Eastern Christianity against Latin pretensions; and when in 863 Nicholas finally anathematized and deposed him, he replied by a counter-excommunication.
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  • The fall of Photius immediately ensued; he was removed from his office and banished about the end of September 867, a few days after the accession of Basil, and Ignatius was reinstated on the 23rd of November.
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  • About 876 Photius was suddenly recalled to Constantinople and entrusted with the education of Basil's children.
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  • On the death of Ignatius, probably in October 878, Photius, after a decent show of reluctance, again filled the patriarchal throne.
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  • He disowned his legates, who had shown a tendency to yield, again excommunicated Photius, and thus aroused the open hostility which has never been appeased to this day.
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  • Strong in the support of the council, Photius simply ignored him.
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  • After the death of Basil (886), his son and successo Leo, who had formerly been devoted to Photius, but in r cent years displayed great hatred towards him, deprived him f his office and banished him to the monastery of Bordi in Arm ia.
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  • From this time Photius disappears from history.
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  • For long after Photius's death his memory was held in no special honour by his countrymen.
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  • But when, in the crusading age, the Greek Church and state were alike in danger from Lat n encroachments, Photius became a national hero, and is at pres nt regarded as little short of a saint.
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  • To Photius we are indebted for almost all w possess of Ctesias, Memnon, Conon, the lost books of Diodorus Sictlus, and the lost writings of Arrian.
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  • Reifzenstein (Der Anfang des Lexikons des Photius, 1907) has published a hitherto unedited MS. containing numerous fragments from various verse and prose authors.
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  • After the allusions in his own writings the chief contemporary authority for the life of Photius is his bitter enemy, Nicetas the Paphlagonian, the biographer of his rival Ignatius.
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  • The standard modern work is that of Cardinal Hergenrother, Photius, Patriarch von Constantinopel (1867-1869).
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  • As a dignitary of the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinal HergenrOther is inevitably biased against Photius as an ecclesiastic, but his natural candour and sympathy with intellectual eminence have made him just to the man.
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  • One of his first acts was to exile the patriarch Photius and restore his rival Ignatius, whose claims were supported by the pope., Yet he had no intention of yielding to Rome's pretensions beyond a certain point.
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  • In 877 Photius became patriarch again, and there was a virtual though not a formal breach with Rome.
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  • Aristarchi, who edited a valuable collection of 83 newly discovered homilies of the patriarch Photius.
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  • Photius, shortly after the council in which he had pronounced sentence of deposition against Pope Nicholas, was driven from the patriarchate by a new emperor, Basil the Macedonian, who favoured his rival Ignatius.
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  • At this council Adrian was represented by legates, who presided at the condemnation of Photius, but did not succeed in coming to an understanding with Ignatius on the subject of the jurisdiction over the Bulgarian converts.
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  • Ratramnus perhaps won most glory in his own day by his Contra Graecorum opposita, in four books (868), a valued contribution to the controversy between the Eastern and Western Churches which had been raised by the publication of the encyclical letter of Photius in 867.
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  • In order to perfect his knowledge of Christian doctrine, Psellus had recourse to the instructions of Photius, and then replied to his adversary in a long iambic poem, in which he maintained his orthodoxy.
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  • The collection has had several commentators; we need only mention the commentaries of Photius (883), Zonaras (1120) and Balsamon (1170).
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  • It is probable that the apparent severity of the medieval Latin Church on this subject was largely due to the real strictness of the Greek Church, which, under the patriarch Photius in 864, had taken what was virtually a new departure in its fasting praxis.
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  • Accomplished men of letters, such as Julius Vestinus and Aelius Dionysius, selected from his writings choice passages for declamation or perusal, of which fragments are incorporated in the miscellany of Photius and the lexicons of Harpocration, Pollux and Suidas.
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  • Especially interesting is the De natura rerum ad Sisebutum 1 With Isidore of Alexandria has been confused an Isidore of Gaza, mentioned by Photius.
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  • He was a man of very great learning, only surpassed by Photius and Michael Psellus.
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  • The locality described by Diodorus after Cleitarchus corresponds in important particulars with Takhti Jamshid, for example, in being supported by the ' This statement is not made in Ctesias (or rather in the extracts of Photius) about Darius II., which is probably accidental; in the case of Sogdianus, who as a usurper was not deemed worthy of honourable burial, there is a good reason for the omission.
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  • A more liberal estimate might include John Scotus Erigena or even Anselm or Bernard of Clairvaux in the West and Photius in the East.
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  • The short excerpt from Ctesias, which Photius has preserved, contains useful information, although we must always mistrust him.
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  • Thus the later work aimed at superseding the earlier, much as Photius suggests (see above).
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  • He became a close friend of Isidore, succeeded him as head of the school in Athens, and wrote his biography, part of which is preserved in the Bibliotheca of Photius (see appendix to the Didot edition of Diogenes Laertius).
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  • Suidas, misled by an incomplete excerpt in Photius from the life of Isidorus (the Neoplatonist) by Damascius, states that Hypatia was the wife of Isidorus; but this is chronologically impossible, since Isidorus could not have been born before 434 (see Hoche in Philologus).
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