Philosophica sentence example

philosophica
  • In 1644 it appeared in a Latin version, revised by Descartes, as Specimina philosophica.
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  • His chief work is, perhaps, his Grammatica philosophica (Milan, 1628).
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  • If zinc be heated to near its boiling-point, it catches fire and burns with a brilliant light into its powdery white oxide, which forms a reek in the air (lana philosophica, " philosopher's wool").
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  • A posthumous work entitled Contemplatio Philosophica was printed for private circulation in 1793 by his grandson, Sir William Young, Bart., prefaced by a life of the author, and with an appendix containing letters addressed to him by Bolingbroke, Bossuet, &c. Several short papers by him were published in Phil.
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  • In 1712 he wrote two essays, which are still in manuscript, one on substance and accident, and the other called Clavis Philosophica.
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  • In 1692 appeared his Logica sive Ars Ratiocinandi, and also Ontologia et Pneumatologia; these, with the Physica (1695), are incorporated with the Opera Philosophica, which have passed through several editions.
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  • Molesworth's collection of the Latin Opera philosophica (5 vols., 1839-1845) will be cited as L.W.
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  • In this first public edition (12mo), the title was changed to Elementa philosophica de cive, the references in the text to the previous sections being omitted.
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  • This is all the more remarkable as he found time to continue his studies, one monument of which was his Theologia Philosophica (a lost MS.), a learned attempt to harmonize revelation and nature, which drew forth the wonder of Baxter.
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  • In 5904 he published an autobiography entitled Biographia philosophica, in which he sketched the progress of his intellectual development.
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  • It was printed in 1503, and afterwards included in Reysch's Margarita philosophica.
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  • His ideas and experiments on the nature of minerals and other substances are voluminously set forth in his Physica Subterranea (Frankfort, 1669); an edition of this, published at Leipzig in 1703, contains two supplements (Experimentum chymicum novum and Demonstratio Philosophica), proving the truth and possibility of transmuting metals, Experimentum novum ac curiosum de minera arenaria perpetua, the paper on timepieces already mentioned and also Specimen Becherianum, a summary of his doctrines by Stahl, who in the preface acknowledges indebtedness to him in the words Becheriana sunt quae profero.
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