Peisistratus sentence example

peisistratus
  • Macan, suggest the period between Solon and Peisistratus, c. 570 B.C. It may be questioned, however, whether the whole episode is not mythical.
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  • From this widely accepted belief arose the almost certainly false statement that Peisistratus took part in Solon's successful war against Megara, which necessarily took place before Solon's archonship (probably in 600 B.C.).
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  • Whatever be the true explanation of this problem, it is certain (1) that Peisistratus was regarded as a leading soldier, and (2) that his position was strengthened by the prestige of his family.
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  • Partly owing to this, and partly to ancient feuds whose origin we cannot trace, the Athenian people was split up into three great factions known as the Plain (Pedieis) led by Lycurgus and Miltiades, both of noble families; the Shore (Parali) led by the Alcmaeonidae, represented at this time by Megacles, who was strong in his wealth and by his recent marriage with Agariste, daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon; the Hill or Upland (Diacreis, Diacrii) led by Peisistratus, who no doubt owed his influence among these hillmen partly to the possession of large estates at Marathon.
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  • Hence their attachment to Peisistratus, the "man of the people," who called upon them to sweep away the last barriers which separated rich and poor, nobles and commoners, city and countryside.
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  • The Alcmaeonids fled and Peisistratus remained in power for about five years, during which Solon's death occurred.
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  • The condition was that their families should be allied by the marriage of Peisistratus to Megacles' daughter Coesyra.
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  • A beautiful woman, it is said, by name Phya, was disguised as Athena and drove into the Agora with Peisistratus at her side, while proclamations were made that the goddess herself was restoring Peisistratus to Athens.
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  • Further it is suggested that Peisistratus was unwilling to have children by one on whom lay the curse of the Cylonian outrage.
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  • Yet there is no doubt that the rule of Peisistratus was most beneficial to Athens both in her foreign and in her internal relations.
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  • But the great wisdom of Peisistratus is shown most clearly in the skill with which he blinded the people to his absolutism.
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  • It seems likely that Peisistratus, to please his supporters, originated the City-Dionysia.
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  • Lastly, Peisistratus carried out the purification of Delos, the sacred island of Apollo of the Ionians; all the tombs were removed from the neighbourhood of the shrine, the abode of the god of light and joy.
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  • As to the library of Peisistratus, we have no good evidence; it may perhaps be a fiction of an Alexandrian writer.
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  • It should be observed that the tyranny of Peisistratus is one of the many epochs of Greek history on which opinion has almost entirely changed since the age of Grote.
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  • The foundations seem to belong to the 7th century, except those of the colonnade, which was possibly added by Peisistratus.
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  • The foundations of a temple were laid on the site - probably that of an ancient sanctuary - by Peisistratus, but the building in its ultimate form was for the greater part constructed under the auspices of Antiochus IV.
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  • Fragments of Doric columns and foundations were discovered, probably intended for the temple begun by Peisistratus, the orientation of which differed slightly from that of the later structure.
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  • In fact, it does for the Robin Hood cycle what a few years before Sir Thomas Malory had done for the Arthurian romances - what in the 6th century B.C. Peisistratus is said to have done for the Homeric poems.
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  • He belonged to the circle of Peisistratus at Athens, and was the founder of an Orphic community.
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  • It had come to be a current belief that the Iliad was first committed to writing in the age of Peisistratus.
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  • All the members of the family went into banishment, and having returned in the time of Solon (594) were again expelled (538) by Peisistratus.
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  • During the reign of Peisistratus he is said to have visited Athens, on which occasion he related the fable of The Frogs asking for a King, to dissuade the citizens from attempting to exchange Peisistratus for another ruler.
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  • Considerable alterations were introduced into the proceedings by Peisistratus and his sons.
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  • Every fourth year the festival was celebrated with peculiar magnificence; gymnastic sports were added to the horse races; and there is little doubt that Peisistratus aimed at making the penteteric Panathenaea the great Ionian festival in rivalry to the Dorian Olympia.
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  • The festival which had been beautified by Peisistratus was made still more imposing under the rule of Pericles.
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  • We know that Peisistratus ruled by controlling the archonship, which was always held by members of his family, and the archonship of Isagoras was clearly an important party victory; we know further the names of three important men who held the office between Cleisthenes' reform and the Persian War (Hipparchus, Themistocles, Aristides) from which we infer that the office was still the prize of party competition.
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  • At Athens Antiochus began to build a vast temple of Zeus Olympius, in place of one begun by Peisistratus; but it was only finished by Hadrian in A.D.
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  • In 461 they contracted an alliance with Athens, thus renewing a connexion established by Peisistratus.
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  • The Platonic dialogue Hipparchus attributes it to Hipparchus, son of Peisistratus.
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  • The voice of antiquity is unanimous in declaring that " Peisistratus first committed the poems of Homer to writing, and reduced them to the order in which we now read them."
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  • Again, the Platonic dialogue Hip parchus (which though not genuine is probably earlier than the Alexandrian times) asserts that Hipparchus, son of Peisistratus, first brought the poems to Athens, and obliged the rhapsodists at the Panathenaea to follow the order of the text, " as they still do," instead of reciting portions chosen at will.
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  • Such attempts usually start with the tacit assumption that each of the persons concerned - Lycurgus, Solon, Peisistratus, Hipparchus - must have done something for the text of Homer, or for the regulation of the rhapsodists.
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  • Thucydides notices as a popular mistake the belief that Hipparchus was the eldest son of Peisistratus, and that consequently he was the reigning " tyrant " when he was killed by Aristogiton.
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  • With regard to the statements which attribute some work in connexion with Homer to Peisistratus, it was noticed by Wolf that Cicero, Pausanias and the others who mention the matter do so nearly in the same words, and, therefore, appear to have drawn from a common source.
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  • This source was .in all probability an epigram quoted in two of the short lives of Homer, and there said to have been inscribed on the statue of Peisistratus at Athens.
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  • In it Peisistratus is made to say of himself that he "collected Homer, who was formerly sung in fragments, for the golden poet was a citizen of ours, since we Athenians founded Smyrna."
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  • The other statements repeat these words with various minor additions, chiefly intended to explain how the poems had been reduced to this fragmentary condition, and how Peisistratus set to work to restore them.
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  • Thus all the authority for the work of Peisistratus " reduces itself to the testimony of a single anonymous inscription " (Nutzhorn p. 40).
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  • It is impossible of course to believe that a statue of Peisistratus was set up at Athens in the time of the free republic. The epigram is almost certainly a mere literary exercise.
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  • Only that Homer was recited in fragments by the rhapsodists, and that these partial recitations were made into a continuous whole by Peisistratus; which does not necessarily mean more than that Peisistratus did what other authorities ascribe to Solon and Hipparchus, viz.
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  • Against the theory which sees in Peisistratus the author of the first complete text of Homer we have to set the absolute silence of Herodotus, Thucydides, the orators and the Alexandrian grammarians.
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  • Herodotus and Thucydides seem to tell us all that they know of Peisistratus.
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  • It was inevitable that later writers should speculate about the authorship of such a law, and that it should be attributed with more or less confidence to Solon or Peisistratus or Hipparchus.
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  • It is probably not an accident that Dieuchidas, who attributed so much to Peisistratus, was a Megarian.
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  • In the times to which the story of Peisistratus can be traced, the 1st century B.C., the substitution of the " tyrant " for the legislator was extremely natural.
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  • It may even be suspected that anecdotes in praise of Peisistratus and Hipparchus were a delicate form of flattery addressed to the reigning Ptolemy.
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  • In the later Byzantine times it was believed that Peisistratus was aided by seventy grammarians, of whom Zenodotus and Aristarchus were the chief.
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  • It is true that Tzetzes, one of the writers from whom we have this story, gives a better version, according to which Peisistratus employed four men, viz.
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  • In the earlier part of his Meletemata (1830) he took up the question of written or unwritten literature, on which Wolf's whole argument turned, and showed that the art of writing must be anterior to Peisistratus.
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  • The conjectures of Hermann, in which the Wolfian theory found a modified and tentative application, were presently thrown into the shade by the more trenchant method of Lachmann, who (in two papers read to the Berlin Academy in 1837 and 1841) sought to show that the Iliad was made up of sixteen independent " lays," with various enlargements and interpolations, all finally reduced to order by Peisistratus.
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  • Lastly, a few passages were interpolated in the time of Peisistratus.
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  • On the first opportunity Bacon rose and briefly pointed out that the earl's plea of having done nothing save what was absolutely necessary to defend his life from the machinations of his enemies was weak and worthless, inasmuch as these enemies were purely imaginary; and he compared his case to that of Peisistratus, who had made use of a somewhat similar stratagem to cloak his real designs upon the city of Athens.
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  • Bacon's use of this illustration and of the former one of Peisistratus, has been much commented on, and in general it seems to have been thought that had it not been for his speeches Essex might have escaped, or, at all events, have been afterwards pardoned.
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  • In the 6th century B.C. the influence of the Delian Apollo was at its height; Polycrates of Samos dedicated the neighbouring island of Rheneia to his service and Peisistratus of Athens caused all the area within sight of the temple to be cleared of the tombs by which its sanctity was impaired.
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  • He may well be compared with the Athenian Peisistratus in these respects.
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  • Peisistratus, taking possession of Delos, seems to have used the sanctuary as a means of extending his political influence.
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  • He was named after Peisistratus, the youngest son of Nestor, the alleged ancestor of his family; he was second cousin on his mother's side to Solon, and numbered among his ancestors Codrus the last great king of Athens.
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  • Peisistratus, though Solon's junior by thirty years, was his lifelong friend (though this is denied), nor did their friendship suffer owing to their political antagonism.
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  • The ruse was successful, but Peisistratus soon quarrelled with Megacles over Coesyra.
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  • It appears that Peisistratus was benevolent to the last, and, like Julius Caesar, showed no resentment against enemies and calumniators.
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  • It may fairly be held that the reforms of Solon would have been futile had they not been fulfilled and amplified by the genius of Peisistratus.
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  • Like Peisistratus, he was fond of having distinguished literary men about him, such as the historian Philistus, the poet Philoxenus, and the philosopher Plato, but treated them in a most arbitrary manner.
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  • After a period of disorder and party-feud among the nobles the new constitution was superseded in fact, if not in form, by the autocratic rule of Peisistratus, and his sons Hippias and Hipparchus.
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  • They find that the documents are of composite origin, partly notes from Mary to Darnley, partly a diary of Mary's, and so on; all combined and edited by some one who played the part of the legendary editorial committee of Peisistratus (see Homer), which compiled the Iliad and Odyssey out of fragmentary lays !
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  • His speculations were thoroughly in harmony with the ideas and sentiment of the time, and his historical arguments, especially his long array of testimonies to the work of Peisistratus, were hardly challenged.
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