Pecora sentence example

pecora
  • For other characteristics see Pecora.
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  • As regards classification, the first group is that of the Pecora, or Cotylophora, in which the cheek-teeth are selenodont, but there are no upper incisors or canine-like premolars, Pecora.
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  • Stomach, although complex, differing essentially from that of the Pecora.
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  • The cheek-teeth are selenodont, as in the two preceding groups; there are no upper incisors, but there are long, narrow and pointed upper canines, which attain a large size in the males; the lower canines are incisor-like, as in the Pecora, and there are no caniniform premolars in either jaw.
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  • Ruminating, but the stomach with only three distinct compartments, the maniplies or third cavity of the stomach of the Pecora being rudimentary.
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  • It includes the two families Anoplotheriidae and Dichobunidae, of which the first died out with the Oligocene, while the second may have given origin to the Tragulina and perhaps the Pecora.
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  • Pecora, or true ruminants as they may be conveniently called, have complex stomachs and chew the cud; they have no upper incisor teeth; and the lower canines are approximated to the outer incisors in such a manner that the three incisors and the one canine of the two sides collectively form a continuous semicircle of four pairs of nearly similar teeth.
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  • Another general, although not universal, characteristic of the Pecora is the presence of simple or complex appendages on the forehead commonly known as horns.
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  • Again, the remarkable horned North American Oligocene genus Protoceras, while displaying resemblances to Leptomeryx and Leptoreodon, presents also points of similarity to the Tragulina and Pecora (q.v.).
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  • The characteristics of the sub-family Bovinae, or typical section of the family Bovidae, are given in the article Bovidae; for the systematic position of that family see Pecora.
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  • By Professor Max Weber it is employed as a collective designation for these groups, together with the extinct Anthracotheroidea and Dichobunoidea; but its use seems best restricted to a general term rather than a definite systematic group. (See ARTIODACTYLA, PECORA, TYLOPODA.)
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  • As stated in the article Artiodactyla, these animals typify the family Suidae, which, with the Hippopotamidae, constitute the section Suina, a group of equal rank with the Pecora.
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  • Though these animals ruminate, the stomach differs considerably in the details of its construction from that of the Pecora.
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