Paus sentence example

paus
  • It may be inferred from a comparison of Paus.
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  • 5; Paus.
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  • It is enough to decide that the ark represented in some way or other the presence of Yahweh and that the safety of his followers depended upon its security (analogies in Frazer, Paus.
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  • Jacobitz; Paus.
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  • The accuser and the accused, standing on two white stones termed " Relentlessness " ('AvaiSEca) and " Outrage " ("T i 3pcs) respectively (Paus.
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  • They had in all probability taken place originally in the Agora, but were later transferred to the neighbouring building known as the Skias (Paus.
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  • These probably arose after the foundation of Messene in 369 B.C. Aristomenes' statue was set up in the stadium there: his bones were fetched from Rhodes and placed in a tomb surmounted by a column (Paus.
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  • Another form of the legend (Paus.
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  • The Council Hall (Bouleuterium, Paus.
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  • by the Thebans before Leuctra (Paus.
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  • Polybius (ii.-viii.) follows the Memoirs which Aratus wrote to justify his statesmanship, - Plutarch (Aratus and Cleomenes) used this same source and the hostile account of Phylarchus; Paus.
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  • The Argives believed that Hera recovered her virginity every year by bathing in a certain spring (Paus.
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  • 2, 4, 10 seq., 14, 28, 30, 74, $ 7-94; Frazer, Paus.
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  • Moreover, we find at Madagascar the procession of the god of fertility and healing, the patron of serpents who are the ministers of his vengeance (Frazer, Paus.
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  • 9 Paus.
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  • Altars so raised were, like most religious survivals, considered as endowed with particular sanctity; the most remarkable recorded instances of such are the altars of Hera at Samos, and of Pan at Olympia (Paus.
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  • 15.5), of Heracles at Thebes (Paus.
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  • 7), and of Zeus at Olympia (Paus.
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  • ?;$141114-0# of the horns of goats believed to have been slain by Diana; while at Miletus was an altar composed of the blood of victims sacrificed (Paus.
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  • The altar at Phorae in Achaea was of unhewn stones (Paus.
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  • Cithaeron was of wood, and was consumed along with the sacrifice (Paus.
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  • Such deities were styled 6 i f wp.oc, each having a separate part of the altar (Paus.
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  • In the same way, the "unknown gods" were regarded as a unit, and had in Athens and at Olympia one altar for all (Paus.
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  • 116), and Dolopians (Paus.
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  • In the age of the Antonines the association was still in existence (Paus.
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  • 62; Paus.
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  • 33), inscribing the proverbs of the Seven Sages on the walls (Paus.
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  • Paus.
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  • Human sacrifice to Dionysus, Paus.
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  • The stone came forth first, and Pausanias saw it at Delphi (Paus.
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  • Pauganias saw the clay (Paus.
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  • At Sparta a cenotaph was erected in his memory near the tombs of Pausanias and Leonidas, and yearly speeches were made and games celebrated in their honour, in which only Spartiates could compete (Paus.
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  • 31), Tantalis, afterwards swallowed up by earthquake in the pool Sale or Saloe, was the ancient name of Sipylus and "the capital of Maeonia" (Paus.
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  • POLYBIUS (c. 204-122 B.C.), Greek historian, was a native of Megalopolis in Arcadia, the youngest of Greek cities (Paus.
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  • He was at once the son and bridegroom of Cybele (q.v.) or Cybebe, the mother of the gods, whose image carved by Broteas, son of Tantalus, was adored on the cliffs of Sipylus (Paus.
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