Patricius sentence example

patricius
  • Oswald, who is called patricius by Simeon of Durham, succeeded, but reigned only twenty-seven days, when he was expelled and eventually became a monk.
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  • 2628), but in distant quarters, such as Egypt, she and her son claim the dignity of Augustus; Petrus Patricius.
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  • Despite 1 We even find a feminine form, patricissa, for the wife of a patricius.
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  • The golden circlet worn on the head by the patricius as a symbol of his dignity was called a patricialis circulus.
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  • the calceus patricius, mulleus (of red leather) and senatorius (of black leather).
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  • It disappeared, and the small remnants of the imperial possessions on the mainland, Naples and Calabria, passed under the authority of the "patricius" of Sicily, and when Sicily was conquered by the Arabs in the Toth century were erected into the themes of Calabria and Langobardia.
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  • Patricius, § BD) he decided to throw in his lot with the cause of Rome.
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  • Patricius, 1851; Ph.
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  • The Irish church has paid more reverence to St Patricius than to Palladius (373-463), and the church of St Patricius, himself a figure as important as obscure, certainly abounded in bishops; according to Angus the Culdee there were 1071, but these cannot have been bishops with territorial sees, and the heads of monasteries were more potent personages.
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  • In Church history a sect founded by Patricius (c. 387), teacher of Symmachus the Marcionite, are known as the Patricians; they believed that all flesh was made by the devil.
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  • The dignity was not hereditary and belonged only to individuals; thus a patrician family was merely one whose head enjoyed the rank of patricius.
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  • Gradually the root sense of "father" came to the front again, and the patricius was regarded as the "father of the emperor" (Ammian Marc. xxix.
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  • The emperor Zeno enacted that no one could become patricius who had not been praejectus militum, consul or magister militum, but less careful emperors gave the title to their favourites, however young and undistinguished.
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  • The idea of this extension originated no doubt in the fact that the Italian patricius of the 6th and 7th centuries had come to be regarded as the defensor, protector, patronus of the Church.
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  • As a matter of fact it is clear that the patriciate of Pippin was a new office, especially as the title is henceforward generally patricius Romanorum, not patricius alone.
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  • " Patricius"; and histories of Charlemagne (q.v.; and his successors.
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  • Poole) that Bale confused him with one John, the son of Patricius, a Spaniard, who tells much the same story of his own travels.
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  • He is always "Praefectus Italiae," "Patricius" or "Dux Italiae," except when he bears the style of his former offices in the imperial household, "Ex-Praepositus [Cubiculi]" or "Chartularius."
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  • At Tours he received from the distant emperor at Constantinople the diploma and insignia of patricius and Roman consul, which legalized his military conquests by putting him in possession of civil powers.
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  • A vigorous but ineffectual warfare had already been waged against the blind traditions of the schools by Ramus and Telesius, by Patricius and Campanella, and the revolution which Galileo completed had been prepared by his predecessors.
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  • Other Hermetic writings which have been preserved, and which have been for the most part collected by Patricius in the Nova de universis philosophia (1593), are (in Greek) 'Iarpoµa011µaTCKit lrpos "Aµµcov a AMy 151rrCOV, llepI KaraKXia WS VOUOlurwv?repe-pyWa-TCKd, 'EK T7js µa8rJµaTCKijs brtUT1] µ1]s 7rpos"Aµµcova: (in Latin) Aphorismi sive Centiloquium, Cyranides; (in Arabic, but doubtless from a Greek original) an address to the human soul, which has been translated by H.
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  • patricius, an adjectival form from pater, father; not, as some say, from pater and ciere, to call), a term originally applied to the members of the old citizen families of ancient Rome (see I.
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  • Ethelweard gave himself the bombastic title "Patricius Consul Quaestor Ethelwerdus," and unfortunately this title is only too characteristic of the man.
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