Paribus sentence example

paribus
  • Thus, ceteris paribus, deaths from lightning are much more numerous in a country than in an industrial population.
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  • Now nickel contracts instead of lengthening when it is magnetized, and an experiment by Knott showed, as he expected, that caeteris paribus a nickel wire twists in a sense opposite to that in which iron twists.
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  • The law that, caeteris paribus, n varies inversely as the thickness may be tested by forming a string of four lengths of the single thread used before, and consequently of double the thickness of the latter, when, for the same length and tension, the compound thread will exhibit double the number of ventral segments presented by the single thread.
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  • If Tate'S Law Be True, That Ceteris Paribus M Varies As A, It Follows From (I) That F Is Constant.
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  • The interval from one swelling to the next is the space described by the drop during one complete vibration,and is therefore (as Plateau shows) proportional ceteris paribus to the square root of the head.
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  • If the length of the arms AC =BC =/,CD =a,SD=s, the angle of deviation of ° Z the balance from the horizontal =4), the weight of the beam alone G, the weight on one side = P, that on the other = P +Z, and lastly the weight of each scale with its appurtenances = Q then Zl tan:473 - 12 (P+Q)+Z la+G sj From this it is inferred that the deviation, and therefore the sensitive - ness, of the balance increases with the length of the beam, and de - creases as the distances, a and s, increase; also, that a heavy balance is, ceteris paribus, less sensitive than a light one, and that the sensitive - ness decreases continually the greater the weight put upon the scales.
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  • It seems a plausible conjecture that if "futures" were " bulling " the market in the first case, they were at least " bulling " it less in the second case ceteris paribus, and probably correlations have not been worked out.'
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  • This form has two distinct advantages: (I) if spherical mirrors are employed their aberrations have a tendency to correct each other; grain' (2) the instrument is shorter than the Gregorian, caeteris paribus, by twice the focal length of the small mirror.
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  • If the length of the arms AC =BC =/,CD =a,SD=s, the angle of deviation of ° Z the balance from the horizontal =4), the weight of the beam alone G, the weight on one side = P, that on the other = P +Z, and lastly the weight of each scale with its appurtenances = Q then Zl tan:473 - 12 (P+Q)+Z la+G sj From this it is inferred that the deviation, and therefore the sensitive - ness, of the balance increases with the length of the beam, and de - creases as the distances, a and s, increase; also, that a heavy balance is, ceteris paribus, less sensitive than a light one, and that the sensitive - ness decreases continually the greater the weight put upon the scales.
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