Papias sentence example

papias
  • Papias >>
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  • The Jewish expectations are adopted for example, by Papias, by the writer of the epistle of Barnabas, and by Justin.
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  • Papias actually confounds expressions of Jesus with verses from the Apocalypse of Baruch, referring to the amazing fertility of the days of the Messianic kingdom (Papias in Iren.
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  • But he does not indulge, like Papias, in sensuous descriptions of this seventh millennium; to Barnabas it is a time of rest, of sinlessness, and of a holy peace.
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  • 28, 29) has the same conception of the millennial kingdom as Barnabas and Papias, and appeals in support of it to the testimony of disciples of the apostles.
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  • Marcion., 3) aimed at a more spiritual conception of the millennial blessings than Papias had, but he still adhered, especially in his Montanistic period, to all the ancient anticipations.
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  • Papias, his ETaZpos (Irenaeus), turns in fact from " the vain talk of the many, and from the " alien commandments " to such as were " delivered by the Lord to the faith," offering to the Christian world his Interpretation of the Lord's Oracles based upon personal inquiry from those who " came his way," who could testify as to apostolic tradition.
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  • Its life is the measure of the period of oral tradition, whose requiem is sung by Papias.
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  • The nature of the heresy, opposed, however, and the resort to the authority of Jude " the brother of James " against it, favour rather the period of Polycarp and Papias (117-150).
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  • Andreas of Caesarea mentions Papias as attesting the credibility of Revelation, and cites two of his remarks on Rev. xii.
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  • The fact that Eusebius does not mention Revelation among the New Testament books known to Papias (H.E.
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  • Moreover, Papias may be one of the presbyters to whom, as having actually seen John, Irenaeus (v.
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  • The arguments of Dionysius were repeated by Eusebius, who ascribed the work to the presbyter John mentioned by Papias (Eus.
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  • Amongst the chiliasts were Cerinthus, Papias, Justin, Irenaeus, Hippolytus, Tertullian and Victorinus.'
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  • Papias of Hierapolis, in his Exposition of the Lord's Sayings (145-160) appears nowhere to have mentioned it, and clearly distinguishes between " what Andrew, Peter,.
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  • Thus Papias, as Eusebius.
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  • about 314 insists, knew two Johns, and the apostle was to him a far-away figure; indeed early medieval chroniclers recount that Papias " in the second book of the Lord's sayings " asserted that both the sons of Zebedee were " slain by Jews," so that the apostle John would have died before 70.
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  • But Irenaeus was at most fifteen when thus frequenting Polycarp; writes thirty-five to fifty years later in Lyons, admitting that he noted down nothing at the time; and, since his mistaken description of Papias as " a hearer of John " the Zebedean was certainly reached by mistaking the presbyter for the apostle, his additional words " and a companion of Polycarp " point to this same mistaken identification having also operated in his mind with regard to Polycarp. In any case, the very real and important presbyter is completely unknown to Irenaeus, and his conclusion as to the book's authorship resulted apparently from a comparison of its contents with Polycarp's teaching.
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  • The Alexandrian Clement, Tertullian, Origen, Eusebius, Jerome and Augustine only tell of the Zebedean what is traceable to stories told by Papias of others, to passages of Revelation and the Gospel, or to the assured fact of the long-lived Asian presbyter.
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  • - According to a fragment of Papias (ap. Eus.
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  • This account Papias had derived, he tells us, from an informant who had heard it repeatedly given by "the elder," a Christian of the first generation.
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  • There can be little doubt that the work to which Papias himself supposed this story to apply was the Gospel of Mark virtually as we know it.
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  • It may be noted also that the same view of the origin of the Gospel of Mark appears to have been held by a contemporary of Papias, Justin Martyr.
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  • But is our Gospel of Mark also to be identified with the writing by Mark spoken of by "the elder" whose account had been reported to Papias ?
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  • But from whomsoever the expression proceeds - whether from Papias, or his informant, or "the elder"- we may feel sure that considerations such as appeal to us from our training in historical criticism are not those which suggested it, but rather the want of agreement between this Gospel and some standard which on altogether different grounds was applied to it.
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  • It has without good reason, as we have seen, been supposed to show that it cannot be the record by Mark referred to by Papias.
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  • According to Papias, Mark wrote after the death of Peter, i.e.
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  • Thus the Oratorian Andrea Gallandi (1709-1779), in re-issuing Cotelier's collection in his Bibliotheca Veterum Patrum (1765-1781), included the fragments of Papias and the Epistle to Diognetus, to which recent editors have added the citations from the "Elders" of Papias's day found in Irenaeus, and, since 1883, the Didache.
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  • But the convenience of the category "Apostolic Fathers" to express not only those who might possibly have had some sort of direct contact with apostles - such as "Barnabas," Clement, Ignatius, Papias, Polycarp - but also those who seemed specially to preserve the pure tradition of apostolic doctrine during the sub-apostolic age, has led to its general use in a wide and vague sense.
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  • We come finally to the anonymous Teaching of the Twelve Apostles and Papias's Exposition of Oracles of the Lord, so far as this is known to us.
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  • The like is true also of the fragments of the Elders preserved in Irenaeus (so far as these do not really come from Papias).
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  • Of the rest, whose personalities are less known to us, Papias shares Polycarp's qualities and their limitations, the anonymous homilist and Hermas are marked by intense moral earnestness, while the writer to Diognetus joins to this a profound religious insight.
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  • The situation as to the Fourth Gospel has been altered in recent years by the statement attributed to Papias that the two sons of Zebedee (and not only one) were slain by the Jews - a statement which becomes more difficult to put aside as the evidence for it increases (full details in Burkitt, Gosp. Hist.
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  • But this statement does not affect the historical character of John of Ephesus, who is also expressly described by Papias as " a disciple of the Lord " (Eus.
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  • This document is by many scholars identified with the " Logia," mentioned by Papias (Eusebius, Ch.
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  • nearly] fifty years old ": but both his arguments are probably derived from a single source, Papias's interpretation of John viii.
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  • 18, 19 have attracted the attention of biblical scholars, ever since Papias, in his fourth book, of which a fragment has been preserved, discussed the subject.
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  • Some such document, we know, must lie at the base of our Synoptic Gospels, and it is quite possible that it may have been known to and used by Papias.
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  • This name has been suggested by Schleiermacher's interpretation of Papias' fragment on Matthew (see Matthew, Gospel Of).
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  • The expectations were often grossly materialistic, as is evidenced by Papias's quotation as the words of the Lord of a group of sayings from the Apocalypse of Baruch, setting forth the amazing fruitfulness of the earth in the Messianic time.
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  • 14), a tradition probably based on Papias's record (cf.
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  • The presbyter John, whom Papias quotes, says distinctly that "he neither heard the Lord nor accompanied Him" (Eusebius, loc. cit.); and this positive statement is fatal to the tradition, which does not appear until about two hundred and fifty years afterwards, that he was one of the seventy disciples (Epiphanius, pseudo-Origen De recta in Deum fide, and the author of the Paschal Chronicle).
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  • 13, and by the statements of Papias (Eus.
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  • The value of this tradition, which may be based on Papias, who certainly reported that " Matthew compiled the Oracles (of the Lord) in Hebrew," can be estimated only in connexion with the study of the Gospel itself (see below).
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  • PAPIAS, of Hierapolis in Phrygia, one of the "Apostolic Fathers" (q.v.).
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  • The latter had a bias against Papias on account of the influence which his work had in perpetuating, through Irenaeus and others, belief in a millennial reign of Christ upon earth.
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  • In Papias's circle the exceptional in connexion with Christianity seemed quite normal.
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  • Eusebius quotes from him the resurrection of a dead person 4 in the experience of "Philip the Apostle" - who had resided in Hierapolis, and from whose daughters Papias derived the story - and also the drinking of poison ("when put to the test by the unbelievers," says Philip of Side, by "Justus, surnamed Barsabbas") without ill effect.'
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  • Papias 1 G.
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  • Papias was also a pioneer in the habit, later so general, of taking the work of the Six Days (Hexaemeron) and the account of Paradise as referring mystically to Christ and His Church (so says Anastasius of Sinai).
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  • We may waive his other statement that Papias was "a hearer of John," owing to the possibility of a false inference in this case.
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  • But the fact that Irenaeus thought of him as Polycarp's contemporary and "a man of the old time" (apXaaos avilp), together with the affinity between the religious tendencies described in Papias's Preface (as quoted by Eusebius) and those reflected in the Epistles of Polycarp and Ignatius, all point to his having flourished in the first quarter of the 2nd century.
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  • No fact is known inconsistent with c. 60-135 as the period of Papias's life.
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  • Papias uses the term "the Elders," or Fathers of the Christian community, to describe the original witnesses to Christ's teaching, i.e.
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  • But to Irenaeus the term came to mean the primitive custodians of tradition derived from these, such as Papias and his contemporaries, whose traditions Papias committed to writing.
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  • Not a few such traditions Irenaeus has embodied in his work Against Heresies, so preserving in some cases the substance of Papias's Exposition (see Lightfoot, Apostolic Fathers, 1891, for these, as for all texts bearing on Papias).
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  • An analogous process is seen in the use of "disciple," applicable in the apostolic age to Christians at large, but in the course of the subapostolic age restricted to personal "disciples of the Lord" or to martyrs (Papias in Eus.
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  • - The earliest reference to a writing by Matthew occurs in a fragment taken by Eusebius from the same work of Papias from which he has given an account of the composition of a record by Mark (Euseb.
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  • And it is indeed likely that Papias himself closely associated the latter with the Hebrew (or Aramaic) work by Matthew, of which he had been told, since the traditional connexion of this Greek Gospel with Matthew can hardly have begun later than this time.
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  • One of the chief documents, however, here referred to seems to correspond in character with the description given in Papias' fragment of a record of the compilation of "the divine utterances" made by Matthew; and the 'use made of it in our first Gospel may explain the connexion of this Apostle's name with it.
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  • Of these the first is part of an appendix headed " of Ariston the elder " in an old Armenian codex, and taken perhaps from the lost compilations of Papias; as to the other text, it has been doubted by many critics, e.g.
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  • It is possible that the epithet 9eoXo^yos for St John may go back as far as Papias.
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  • All these elements were put together by a Christian contemporary of Papias.
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  • On the question of the relationship of the Synoptic Gospels, Holtzmann in his early work, Die synoptischen Evangelien, ihr Ursprung and geschichtlicher Charakter (1863), presents a view which has been widely accepted, maintaining the priority of Mark, deriving Matthew in its present form from Mark and from Matthew's earlier "collection of Sayings," the Logia of Papias, and Luke from Matthew and Mark in the form in which we have them.
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  • As regards Papias's Exposition, which Lightfoot describes as "among the earliest forerunners of commentaries, partly explanatory, partly illustrative, on portions of the New Testament," we need here only remark that, whatever its exact form may have been - as to which the extant fragments still leave room for doubt - it was in conception expository of the historic meaning of Christ's more ambiguous Sayings, viewed in the light of definitely ascertained apostolic traditions bearing on the subject.
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  • Polycarp, for instance, speaks of " those who pervert the oracles of the Lord " (Philipp. 7), and Papias, as Eusebius tells us, wrote a work with the title " Expositions of the Oracles 6f the Lord."
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  • 39) of the explanation given by "the Elder" (John) as to the contrast in form between Mark's memoirs of Peter's discourses and the Gospel of Matthew (see Gospels; Papias), but defining the place where these memoirs were written as Rome.
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  • This may have been so to some degree; but Papias (whose name itself denotes that he was of the native Phrygian stock, and who shared the enthusiastic religious temper characteristic of Phrygia, see Montanism) was nearer in spirit to the actual Christianity of the sub-apostolic age, especially in western Asia, than Eusebius realized.
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