Officinalis sentence example

officinalis
  • The territories of the Gran Chaco, however, are covered with a characteristic tropical vegetation, in which the palm predominates, but intermingled south of the Bermejo with heavy growths of algarrobo, quebracho-colorado, urunday (Astronium fraxinifolium), lapacho (Tecoma curialis) and palosanto (Guayacum officinalis), all esteemed for hardness and fineness of grain.
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  • Ashes particularly rich in potash are those of burning nettles, wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), fumitory (Fumaria officinalis), and tobacco.
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  • The skink, which has given the name to the whole family, is a small lizard (Scincus officinalis) of 6 or 8 in.
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  • P. officinalis, i ft., has prettily mottled leaves and blue flowers; P. sibirica is similar in character, but has broader leaves more distinctly mottled with white.
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  • Sometimes there is attached to the rootstock a portion of stem, which is round and not prickly, differing in these respects from that of Smilax officinalis, which is square and prickly.
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  • For this reason those barks which, like C. Calisaya, C. officinalis, and C. Ledgeriana, contain but little colouring matter are preferred, the quinine being more easily extracted from them in a colourless form.
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  • Until 1867 English manufacturers of quinine were entirely dependent upon South America for their supplies of cinchona bark, which were obtained exclusively from uncultivated trees, growing chiefly in Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador, the principal species which were used for the purpose being Cinchona Calisaya; C. officinalis; C. macrocalyx, var.
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  • The altitude at which the trees are grown seems to affect the production of quinine, since it has been proved that the yield of quinine in C. officinalis is less when the trees are grown below 600o ft.
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  • Karsten also ascertained by experiments made at Bogota on C. lancifolia that the barks of one district were sometimes devoid of quinine, while those of the same species from a neighbouring locality yielded 32 to 42% of the sulphate; moreover, Dr De Vrij found that the bark of C. officinalis cultivated at Utakamand varied in the yield of quinine from I to 9%.
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  • Sometimes the anther has a single cavity, and becomes unilocular, or monothecal, or dimidiate, either by the disappearance of the partition between the two lobes, or by the abortion of one of its lobes, as in Styphelia laeta and Althaea officinalis (hollyhock).
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  • Each division of the tricarpellary ovary of Jatropha Curcas has a bifurcate or forked style, and the ovary of Emblica officinalis has three styles, each of which is twice forked.
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  • Several species have deliciously aromatic foliage, the most well-known being common sage, Salvia officinalis.
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  • These are Sepia officinalis as only this, the commonest of the large cuttlefish are found in Sussex seas.
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  • Wet or moist ground supports scurvygrass Cochlearia officinalis, marsh-marigold Caltha palustris and common valerian Valeriana officinalis.
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  • Scierophyllous Plants.These are plants with evergreen leathery ives, and typical of tropical, sub-tropical, and warm temperate gions; e.g., Quercus Suber, Ilex Aquifohium, Hedera Helix, Eucalyps Globulus, Rosmarinus officinalis.
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  • Thus white honeysuckle and false honeysuckle are names for the North American Azalea viscosa; Australian or heath honeysuckle is the Australian Banksia serrata, Jamaica honeysuckle, Passiflora laurifolia, dwarf honeysuckle the widely spread Cornus suecica, Virgin Mary's honeysuckle the European Pulmonaria officinalis, while West Indian honeysuckle is Tecoma capensis, and is also 'a' name applied to Desmodium.
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  • Calendula officinalis Meteor: hardy, i ft., orange striped with yellow.
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  • Upper left: Sargassum muticum; bottom, right: Ulva lactuca, covering Corallina officinalis near middle of picture.
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  • Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) is a perennial plant with a very unpleasant smell.
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  • Valerian root, or Valeriana officinalis, is a mild natural sedative that is sometimes used to treat depression and anxiety coupled with insomnia.
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  • Common Balm (Melissa) - M. officinalis is a well-known old garden plant, 2 to 3 feet high, emitting a grateful odour when bruised.
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  • Hyssop (Hyssopus Officinalis) - A little pot herb which has some beauty grown on a rock or wall, and is worth a place apart from its use in the herb border.
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  • P. officinalis and P. angustifolia are native plants.
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  • P. officinalis (sometimes called P. saccharata) has rosy flowers turning to blue, and P. angustifolia bears blue flowers.
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  • P. mollis is intermediate between the two, and P. grandiflora is somewhat similar to P. officinalis, P. azurea has rich blue flowers.
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  • The hybrid sorts have been obtained chiefly from P. officinalis and other European kinds, together with the Chinese species albiflora, sinensis, and edulis.
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  • Valerian, or Valeriana officinalis, Valerian is a natural sleep aid.
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  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is the primary homeopathic remedy for wounds.
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  • Aromatherapists recommend inhaling the fragrances of the essential oils of lavender (Lavandula officinalis), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), sage (Salvia officinalis), and sandalwood.
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  • Several herbal remedies, including calendula (Calendula officinalis), myrrh (Commiphora molmol), and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis), may be helpful in treating existing sores.
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  • Two particularly useful homeopathic remedies are arnica (Arnica montana) and symphytum (Symphytum officinalis).
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  • Among the botanical remedies that may be effective for sleep disorders are valerian (Valeriana officinalis), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), and skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora).
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  • Six drops of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and six drops of thyme (Thymus spp.) diluted by one ounce of almond oil, olive oil, or another carrier oil can relieve constipation when used to massage the abdomen.
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  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) and cleavers (Galium aparine) target the lymphatic system, while echinacea (Echinacea spp.) and astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus)stimulate the immune system.
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  • Tea tree oil (Melaleuca spp.), thuja (Thuja occidentalis), and lavender (Lavandula officinalis) are the most common.
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  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) and plantain (Plantago major) can be used as a mouth rinse to enhance tissue healing.
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  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a natural antiseptic and anti-inflammatory agent.
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  • Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) or lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) tea may relieve symptoms.
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  • For symptom relief, western herbal remedies including eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis) and nettle (Urtica dioica) may be helpful.
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  • These include aloe (Aloe barbadensis), oil of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), calendula (Calendula officinalis), comfrey (Symphytum officinale), and tea tree oil (Melaleuca spp.).
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  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is one of the most frequently recommended to reduce inflammation.
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  • Other useful herbs to reduce symptoms are yarrow (Achillea millefolium), eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), garlic (Allium sativum), and onions (Allium cepa).
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