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nsi

nsi Sentence Examples

  • The proper names and the names of deities, while partly Aramaic, are also in part unmistakably Arabic: it is suggestive that a purely Arabic term (fand, NSI.

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  • southeast of Babylon, or Forath or Charax close to the Persian Gulf (NSI.

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  • One of the chief of them was the production of 'salt from the deposits of the desert; 2 another was no doubt the manufacture of leather; the inscriptions mention also a powerful gild of workers in gold and silver (NSI.

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  • b, NSI.

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  • At a later date, probably under Septimius Severus or Caracalla (beginning of 3rd century), Palmyra received the Jus italicum and the status of a colony; the executive officials of the council and people were called strategoi, equivalent to the Roman duumviri (NSI.

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  • 21, NSI.

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  • 230-231; his son again, Septimius Hairan, seems to have been the first of the family to receive the title of Ras Tadmor (" chief of Tadmor ") in addition to his Roman rank (NSI.

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  • 258, in the reign of Valerian (NSI.

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  • Their opportunity came with the disaster which befell the Roman army under Valerian (q.v.) at Edessa, a disaster, says ' The full text, both Greek and Palmyrene, with an English translation, is given in NSI, pp. 313-340.

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  • In Palmyra Zenobia is still called "queen" ((aaLAcvoa, NSI.

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  • 92 (a Latin inscription of the time of Marcus Aurelius), and NSI.

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  • The South Shields inscription, now in the Free Library of the town, was found in the neighbouring Roman camp; it is given in NSI.

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  • Another interesting divine name, lately discovered, is that of a distinctly Arabic deity " She`aalqum the good and bountiful god who does not drink wine " (NSI.

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  • 5), almost all the inscriptions are subsequent 1 Cooke, North-Semitic Inscriptions (elsewhere abbreviated NSI.), No.

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  • NSI.

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  • Much later, in the 3rd century B.C., an inscription from Tyre mentions a suffete (NSI.

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  • Carthage, of course, was governed by two suffetes, and these officers are frequently named in connexion with the Carthaginian colonies (NSI.

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  • from Tyre may be read, " `Abd ba'al chief of the Hundred," NSI.

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  • i = NSI.

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  • A special interest attaches to these silver tetradrachms and didrachms (staters and halfstaters), because they were used by the Jews for the payment of the temple tax as " shekels of the sanctuary " (NSI.

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  • For at the end of the 4th and the beginning of the 3rd century we have evidence of a native dynasty in the important inscriptions of Tabnith, Eshmun-`azar and Bod-`ashtart, and in the series of inscriptions (repeating the same text) discovered at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon (NSI.

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  • With Bod-`ashtart, so far as we know, the dynasty came to an end, say about 250 B.C.; and it is not unlikely that the Sidonians reckoned an era of independence from this event (NSI.

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  • Laodicea of Libanus was founded by Seleucus Nicator on the plain south-east of Hemesa (Horns) in the region of the upper Orontes, and became an important city; its coins of the 2nd century B.C. bear the interesting legend in Phoenician, " Of Laodicea which is in Canaan " (NSI.

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  • 7 = NSI.

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  • In the inscriptions of the 4th to 3rd centuries, the Phoenician potentates in the island call themselves " kings of Kition and Idalion " (NSI.

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  • Carthage), Hippo, Kition, Tyre " (NSI.

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  • Not a vestige remains of the great sanctuary of Melqarth at Tyre; a few traces of the temple of Adonis near Byblus were discovered by Renan, and a peculiar mausoleum, Burj alBezzaq, is still to be seen near Amrit; recent excavations at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon have unearthed parts of the enclosure or foundations of the temple of Eshmun (NSI.

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  • These plurals go back to the singular form 'El, the common Semitic name for God; but neither the singular nor the plural is at all common in the inscriptions (NSI.

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  • his manifestation, though this rendering is disputed, and some scholars prefer " Ashtart of the heaven of Ba'al " (NSI.

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  • The influence of Egypt was specially strong (NSI.

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  • The Phoenician settlers at the Peiraeus worshipped the Assyrian Nergal, and their proper names are compounded with the names of Babylonian and Arabian deities (NSI.

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  • Stone or bronze images of the gods were set up in the sanctuaries (NSI.

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  • Other persons attached to a temple were priests, augurs, sacrificers, barbers, officials in charge of the curtains, masons, &c. (NSI.

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  • The curious notion prevailed, as it did also among the Greeks and Romans, that it was possible to communicate with the gods of the underworld by dropping into a grave a small roll of lead (tabella devotionis, NSI.

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  • 442; NSI.

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  • p. 268 and Cooke, NSI.

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  • The proper names and the names of deities, while partly Aramaic, are also in part unmistakably Arabic: it is suggestive that a purely Arabic term (fand, NSI.

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  • southeast of Babylon, or Forath or Charax close to the Persian Gulf (NSI.

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  • One of the chief of them was the production of 'salt from the deposits of the desert; 2 another was no doubt the manufacture of leather; the inscriptions mention also a powerful gild of workers in gold and silver (NSI.

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  • b, NSI.

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  • The prominent townsmen were engaged in the organization and even the personal conduct of caravans, the discharge of public offices such as those of strategos, secretary, guardian of the wells, president of the banquets of Bel, chief of the market (see NSI.

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  • 130, granted it the name of Hadriana Palmyra (,non, -rin NSI.

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  • At a later date, probably under Septimius Severus or Caracalla (beginning of 3rd century), Palmyra received the Jus italicum and the status of a colony; the executive officials of the council and people were called strategoi, equivalent to the Roman duumviri (NSI.

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    0
  • 21, NSI.

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  • 230-231; his son again, Septimius Hairan, seems to have been the first of the family to receive the title of Ras Tadmor (" chief of Tadmor ") in addition to his Roman rank (NSI.

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  • 258, in the reign of Valerian (NSI.

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  • Their opportunity came with the disaster which befell the Roman army under Valerian (q.v.) at Edessa, a disaster, says ' The full text, both Greek and Palmyrene, with an English translation, is given in NSI, pp. 313-340.

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  • 262-267) that Palmyra was administered by his deputy Septimius Worod, " procurator ducenarius of Caesar our lord," also styled " commandant," as being Odenathus' viceroy (eci yairETrts, NSI.

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  • In Palmyra Zenobia is still called "queen" ((aaLAcvoa, NSI.

    0
    0
  • 92 (a Latin inscription of the time of Marcus Aurelius), and NSI.

    0
    0
  • The South Shields inscription, now in the Free Library of the town, was found in the neighbouring Roman camp; it is given in NSI.

    0
    0
  • Another interesting divine name, lately discovered, is that of a distinctly Arabic deity " She`aalqum the good and bountiful god who does not drink wine " (NSI.

    0
    0
  • 5), almost all the inscriptions are subsequent 1 Cooke, North-Semitic Inscriptions (elsewhere abbreviated NSI.), No.

    0
    0
  • Much later, in the 3rd century B.C., an inscription from Tyre mentions a suffete (NSI.

    0
    0
  • Carthage, of course, was governed by two suffetes, and these officers are frequently named in connexion with the Carthaginian colonies (NSI.

    0
    0
  • from Tyre may be read, " `Abd ba'al chief of the Hundred," NSI.

    0
    0
  • i = NSI.

    0
    0
  • A special interest attaches to these silver tetradrachms and didrachms (staters and halfstaters), because they were used by the Jews for the payment of the temple tax as " shekels of the sanctuary " (NSI.

    0
    0
  • For at the end of the 4th and the beginning of the 3rd century we have evidence of a native dynasty in the important inscriptions of Tabnith, Eshmun-`azar and Bod-`ashtart, and in the series of inscriptions (repeating the same text) discovered at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon (NSI.

    0
    0
  • With Bod-`ashtart, so far as we know, the dynasty came to an end, say about 250 B.C.; and it is not unlikely that the Sidonians reckoned an era of independence from this event (NSI.

    0
    0
  • Laodicea of Libanus was founded by Seleucus Nicator on the plain south-east of Hemesa (Horns) in the region of the upper Orontes, and became an important city; its coins of the 2nd century B.C. bear the interesting legend in Phoenician, " Of Laodicea which is in Canaan " (NSI.

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    0
  • 7 = NSI.

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    0
  • In the inscriptions of the 4th to 3rd centuries, the Phoenician potentates in the island call themselves " kings of Kition and Idalion " (NSI.

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    0
  • Carthage), Hippo, Kition, Tyre " (NSI.

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    0
  • Not a vestige remains of the great sanctuary of Melqarth at Tyre; a few traces of the temple of Adonis near Byblus were discovered by Renan, and a peculiar mausoleum, Burj alBezzaq, is still to be seen near Amrit; recent excavations at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon have unearthed parts of the enclosure or foundations of the temple of Eshmun (NSI.

    0
    0
  • These plurals go back to the singular form 'El, the common Semitic name for God; but neither the singular nor the plural is at all common in the inscriptions (NSI.

    0
    0
  • his manifestation, though this rendering is disputed, and some scholars prefer " Ashtart of the heaven of Ba'al " (NSI.

    0
    0
  • The influence of Egypt was specially strong (NSI.

    0
    0
  • The Phoenician settlers at the Peiraeus worshipped the Assyrian Nergal, and their proper names are compounded with the names of Babylonian and Arabian deities (NSI.

    0
    0
  • Stone or bronze images of the gods were set up in the sanctuaries (NSI.

    0
    0
  • Other persons attached to a temple were priests, augurs, sacrificers, barbers, officials in charge of the curtains, masons, &c. (NSI.

    0
    0
  • The curious notion prevailed, as it did also among the Greeks and Romans, that it was possible to communicate with the gods of the underworld by dropping into a grave a small roll of lead (tabella devotionis, NSI.

    0
    0
  • 442; NSI.

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  • p. 268 and Cooke, NSI.

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    0
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