Newburyport sentence example

newburyport
  • He graduated at Harvard in 1777, read law at Newburyport, Mass., with Theophilus Parsons, and was admitted to the bar in 1780.
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  • Graduating from Harvard in 1841, he was a schoolmaster for two years, studied theology at the Harvard Divinity School, and was pastor in1847-1850of the First Religious Society (Unitarian) of Newburyport, Massachusetts, and of the Free Church at Worcester in 1852-1858.
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  • Richard graduated at Harvard in 1826, and, after studying law at Newburyport, was admitted to the bar at Boston in 1830.
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  • LAWRENCE, a city, and one of the three county-seats (Salem and Newburyport are the others) of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on both sides of the Merrimac river, about 30 m.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1817, was tutor in mathematics there in 1820-1821, was admitted to practice in the court of common pleas in December 1821, and began the practice of law in Newburyport, Mass., in 1824.
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  • He died at Newburyport, Mass., on the 2nd of January 1879.
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  • He published History and Present State of the Town of Newburyport, Mass.
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  • Other ports of entry in the state in 1909 were Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, Marblehead, Plymouth, Barnstable, Nantucket, Edgartown, New Bedford and Fall River.
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  • NEWBURYPORT, a city and port of entry and one of the =county-seats of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on the S.
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  • from Newburyport in the township of West Newbury) Indian Hill Farm, the birthplace of the journalist Ben Perley Poore (1820-1887), author of Perley's Reminiscences of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis (1886).
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  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the Marine Museum, the Public Library (founded in 1854 by Josiah Little and containing about 45,000 volumes), the old Tracy mansion (built in 1771 or 1772), which forms part of the Public Library building, the Anna Jacques and Homoeopathic hospitals, homes for aged women and men, a Home for Destitute Children, Old South Church, in which is the tomb of George Whitefield, and the Young Men's Christian Association building, which is a memorial to George Henry Corliss (1817-1888), the inventor, erected by his widow, a native of Newburyport.
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  • The Putnam Free School, now part of the public school system, was endowed early in the 19th century by Oliver Putnam of Newburyport and afterwards of Hampstead, New Hampshire.
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  • A curious chain suspension bridge across the Merrimac, connecting Newburyport with Amesbury, was built in 1827, replacing a similar bridge built in 1810, which was one of the first suspension bridges in America.
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  • Newburyport in the early part of the 18th century was one of the most prosperous commercial centres in New England.
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  • After the Civil War manufacturing became Newburyport's chief interest.
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  • Newbury, including the site of the present Newburyport, was settled in 1635 by a company under the leadership of the Rev. Thomas Parker (1595-1677), who had taught in Newbury, England, in his youth.
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  • In 1639 a portion of the territory was set off to form the town of Rowley, and in 1764 about 647 acres were set off and incorporated as the town of Newburyport.
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  • Newburyport, with its area considerably enlarged, became a city in 1851.
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  • See Caleb Cushing, History and Present State of the Town of Newburyport (Newburyport, 1826); Joshua Coffin, History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, 1635-1845 (Boston, 1845); Mrs E.
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  • Smith, History of Newburyport (Boston, 1854); D.
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  • Currier, History of Newbury from the First Settlement of the Town to the Beginning of the Twentieth Century (Boston, 1902), History of Newburyport, 17641905 (Newburyport, 1906), and Ould Newbury, Historical and Biographical Sketches (Boston, 1898).
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  • JOHN LOWELL (1743-1802), American jurist, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on the 17th of June 1743, and was a son of the Reverend John Lowell, the first pastor of Newburyport, and a descendant of Perceval Lowle or Lowell (1571-1665), who emigrated from Somersetshire to Massachusetts Bay in 1639 and was the founder of the family in New England.
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  • John Lowell graduated at Harvard in 1760, was admitted to the bar in 1763, represented Newburyport (1776) and Boston (1778) in the Massachusetts Assembly, was a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of1779-1780and, as a member of the committee appointed to draft a constitution, secured the insertion of the clause, "all men are born free and equal," which was interpreted by the supreme court of the state in 1783 as abolishing slavery in the state.
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  • Another son of the first John Lowell, Francis Cabot Lowell (1775-1817), the founder in the United States of cotton manufacturing, was born in Newburyport on the 7th of April 1775, graduated at Harvard in 1793, became a merchant in Boston, and, during the war of 1812, with his cousin (who was also his brother-in-law), Patrick Tracy Jackson, made use of the knowledge of cotton-spinning gained by Lowell in England (whither he had gone for his health in 1810) and devised a power loom.
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  • JACOB PERKINS (1766-1849), American inventor and physicist, was born at Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1766, and was apprenticed to a goldsmith.
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  • His second SOD, Angier March Perkins (1799?-1881), also born at Newburyport, went to England in 1827, and was the author of a system of warming buildings by means of highpressure steam.
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  • WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON (1805-1879), the American anti-slavery leader, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on the 10th of December 1805.
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  • His mother first set him to learn the trade of a shoemaker, first at Newburyport, and then, after 1815, at Baltimore, Maryland, and, when she found that this did not suit him, let him try his hand at cabinet-making (at Haverhill, Mass.).
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  • Allen, proprietor of the Newburyport Herald, to learn the trade of a printer.
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  • The paper, whose motto was "Our Country, our Whole Country, and nothing but our Country," was full of spirit and intellectual force, but Newburyport was a sleepy place and the enterprise failed.
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  • A vessel owned in Newburyport having taken a cargo of slaves from Baltimore to New Orleans, he characterized the transaction as an act of "domestic piracy," and avowed his purpose to "cover with thick infamy" those engaged therein.
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  • Amesbury is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected by electric line with Haverhill and Newburyport, Mass., and with Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, and Salisbury Beach, Mass., two summer resorts.
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  • There was little art or inspiration in his boyish verse, but in his nineteenth year an older sister thought a specimen of it good enough for submission to the Free Press, a weekly paper which William Lloyd Garrison, the future emancipationist, had started in the town of Newburyport.
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  • He died on the 30th of September 1770 at Newburyport, Massachusetts, where he had arrived on the previous evening with the intention of preaching next day.
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  • Their son, Charles Adams, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and moved to Helena, Arkansas.
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  • Newburyport Blue is deep and rich, similar to a Williamsburg Blue.
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  • For a deep blue that is brighter than the grays in Newburyport Blue, look for Twilight Blue.
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  • FRAXA Research Foundation. 45 Pleasant Street, Newburyport, MA 01950.
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