Nagaoka sentence example

nagaoka
  • Nagaoka.
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  • Nagaoka, Phil.
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  • Nagaoka and K.
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  • Nagaoka, who also, in conjunction with K.
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  • Nagaoka and Honda, who employed a fluid dilatometer, found that the volume of several specimens of iron, steel and nickel was always slightly increased, no diminution being indicated in low fields; cobalt, on the other hand, was diminished in volume, and the amount of the change, though still very small, was greater than that shown by the other metals.
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  • Taylor Jones showed in 1897 that only a small proportion of the contraction exhibited by a nickel wire when magnetized could be accounted for on Kirchhoff's theory from the observed effects of pulling stress upon magnetization; and in a more extended series of observations Nagaoka and Honda found wide quantitative divergences between the results of experiment and calculation, though in nearly all cases there was agreement as to quality.
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  • Also Nagaoka and Jones, Phil.
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  • The effect of tension was subsequently studied by Nagaoka and Honda, who in 1902 confirmed, mutatis mutandis, the results obtained by Chree and Ewing for cast cobalt, while for annealed cobalt it turned out that tension always caused diminution of magnetization, the diminution increasing with increasing fields.
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  • Nagaoka and Honda (Phil.
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  • In the same paper Nagaoka and Honda describe an important experiment on the effect of transverse stress.
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  • Frisbie, 5 who found that for the magnetizing forces used by Nagaoka and Honda pressure produced a small increase of magnetization, a result which appears to be in accord with theory.
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  • Nagaoka and Honda have succeeded in showing that the observed relations between twist and magnetization are in qualitative agreement with an extension of Kirchhoff's theory of magnetostriction.
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  • 4 Nagaoka' has described the remarkable influence of combined torsion and 'tension upon the magnetic susceptibility of nickel, and has made the extraordinary observation that, under certain conditions of stress, the magnetization of a nickel wire may have a direction opposite to that of the magnetizing force.
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  • Rhoads obtained a cyclic curve for iron which indicated thermo-electric hysteresis of the kind exhibited by Nagaoka's curves for magnetic strain.
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  • More 3 that R ought to be 1 For a discussion of theories of magnetic stress, with copious references, see Nagaoka, Rap. du Congres International de Physique (Paris, 1900), ii.
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