Minghetti sentence example

minghetti
  • In August Marco Minghetti succeeded in forming a military league and a customs union between Tuscany, Romagna and the duchies, and in procuring the adoption of the Piedmontese codes; and envoys were sent to Paris to mollify Napoleon.
    0
    0
  • But for the tactics of Rattazzi, leader of the Left, who, by basing his opposition on party considerations, impeded the secession of Minghetti and a part of the Right from the ministerial majority, Sella would have been defeated.
    0
    0
  • Sella, uncertain of the loyalty of the Right, challenged a vote on the immediate discussion of further financial reforms, and on the 23rd of June was overthrown by a coalition of the Left under Depretis with a part of the Right under Minghetti and the Tuscan Centre under Correnti.
    0
    0
  • Practically, therefore, the Right, of which the Minghetti cabinet was the last representative administration, left Italian finance with a surplus of 80,000.
    0
    0
  • Outside the all-important domain of finance, the attention of Minghetti and his colleagues was principally absorbed by strife between church and state, army reform and railway redemption.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • More noteworthy than its management of internal affairs were the efforts of the Minghetti cabinet to strengthen and consolidate national defence.
    0
    0
  • Perceiving the advantage of a visit to the imperial and apostolic court after the Italian occupation of Rome and the suppression of the religious orders, and convinced of the value of more cordial intercourse with the German empire, Visconti-Venosta and Minghetti advised their sovereign to accept both the Austrian and the subsequent German invitations.
    0
    0
  • This process of transformation was not exclusively the work of Depretis, but had been initiated as early as 1873, when a portion of the Right under Minghetti had, by joining the Left, overturned the Lanza-Sella cabinet.
    0
    0
  • In 1876 Minghetti himself had fallen a victim to a similar defection of Conservative deputies.
    0
    0
  • In 1869 he was appointed by Minghetti under secretary of state to the ministry of agriculture and commerce, in which capacity he abolished government control over commercial companies and promoted a state inquiry into the conditions of industry.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Entering the Ricasoli cabinet of 1861 as minister of marine, he held the portfolio of public works until 1864 in the succeeding Farini and Minghetti cabinets.
    0
    0
  • In the first constitutional cabinet, presided over by Cardinal Antonelli, Minghetti held the portfolio of public works, but after the allocution by Pius IX.
    0
    0
  • The convention excited violent opposition at Turin, in consequence of which Minghetti was obliged to resign office.
    0
    0
  • After the advent of the Left, Minghetti remained for some years in Opposition, but towards 1884 joined Depretis in creating the "Trasformismo," which consisted in bringing Conservative support to Liberal cabinets.
    0
    0
  • Minghetti, however, drew from it no personal advantage, and died at Rome on the 10th of December 1886 without having returned to power.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In October 1869 he became minister of the interior in the Menabrea cabinet, but he fell with that cabinet a few months later, and although elected member of parliament for Canicatti held no important position until, upon the death of Minghetti in 1886, he became leader of the Right.
    0
    0
  • The princess, an accomplished pianist and pupil of Liszt, was a step-daughter of the Italian statesman Minghetti.
    0
    0
  • Having reconstriicted the Piedmontese army, he took part in the war of 1859 against Austria; and in July of that year succeeded Cavour in the premiership. In 1860 he was sent to Berlin and St Petersburg to arrange for the recognition of the kingdom of Italy, and subsequently he held the offices of governor of Milan and royal lieutenant at Naples, until, in September 1864, he succeeded Minghetti as premier.
    0
    0
  • Popular enthusiasm induced the Conservative Minghetti cabinet to propose that a sum of 40,000 with an annual pension of 2000 be conferred upon him as a recompense for his services, but the proposal, though adopted by parliament (27th May 1875), was indignantly refused by Garibaldi.
    0
    0
  • ViscontiVenosta, who had retained the portfolio for foreign affairs in the Minghetti cabinet, at once drew the attention of the European powers to this proof of the popes spiritual freedom and of the imaginary nature of his imprisonment in the Vatican.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • ViscontiVenosta and Minghetti, moreover, wisely resisted the chancellors pressure to override the Law of Guarantees and to engage in an Italian Kulturkampf.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, the redemption of the railways by the statecontracts for which had been signed by Sella in 1875 on behalf of the Minghetti cabinet with Rothschild at Basel and with the Austrian government at Viennahad been fiercely opposed by the Left, although its members were for the most part convinced of the utility of the operation.
    0
    0
  • When, at the beginning of March 1876, these contracts were submitted to parliament, a group of Tuscan deputies, under Cesare Correnti, joined the opposition, and on the 18th of March took advantage of a chance motion concerning the date of discussion of an interpellation on the grist tax to place the Minghetti cabinet in a minority.
    0
    0
  • Visconti-Ven.osta and Minghetti, partly from aversion to a Jacobin policy, and partly from a conviction that Bismarck sooner or later would undertake his Gang nach Canossa, regardless of any tacit engagement he might have assumed towards Italy, had wisely declined to be drawn into any infraction of the Law of Guarantees.
    0
    0
  • Peruzzi, Lanza and Bonghi pleaded for equal friendship with all powers, and especially with France; Crispi, Minghetti, Cadorna and others, including Blanc, secretary-general to the foreign office, openly favored a pro-Austrian policy.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • When, in course of time, the extended suffrage increased the Republican and Extreme Radical elements in the Chamber, and the Liberal Pentarchy (composed of Crispi, Cairoli, Nicotera, Zanardelli and Baccarini) assumed an attitude of bitter hostility to Depretis, the Right, obeying the impulse of Minghetti, rallied openly to Depretis, lending him aid without which his prolonged term of office would have been impossible.
    0
    0