Merrimac sentence example

merrimac
  • Terry, against Fort Fisher, in 1865; within sight of its parapets was fought the famous duel between the "Monitor" and the "Merrimac" (March 9, 1862).
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  • In June the Confederates set to work to raise one of these abandoned vessels, the frigate "Merrimac" of 3500 tons and 40 guns, and to rebuild it as an iron-clad.
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  • Dahlgren guns; her crew numbered 58, while that of the "Merrimac" numbered about 300.
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  • Actual firing began about 2 o'clock, when the "Merrimac" was nearly a mile from the "Congress" and the "Cumberland."
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  • Passing the first of these vessels with terrific broadsides, the "Merrimac" rammed the "Cumberland" and then turned her fire again on the "Congress," which in an attempt to escape ran aground and was there under fire from three other Confederate gun-boats which had meanwhile joined the "Merrimac."
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  • Between 4 and 4.30 the "Congress," having been raked fore and aft for nearly an hour by the "Merrimac," was forced to surrender.
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  • While directing a fire of hot shot to burn the "Congress," Commodore Buchanan of the "Merrimac" was severely wounded and was succeeded in the command by Lieutenant Catesby ap Roger Jones.
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  • When the "Merrimac" advanced to attack the "Minnesota," the "Monitor" went out to meet her, and the battle between the iron-clads began about 9 a.m.
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  • When the battle was renewed (about 11.30) the "Merrimac" began firing at the "Monitor's" pilot house; and a little after noon a shot struck the sight-hole of the pilot house and blinded Lieut.
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  • The "Monitor" withdrew in the confusion consequent upon the wounding of her commanding officer; and the "Merrimac" after a short wait for her adversary steamed back to Norfolk.
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  • After the evacuation of Norfolk by the Confederates on the 9th of May Commodore Josiah Tattnall, then in command of the "Merrimac," being unable to take her up the James, sank her.
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  • The Merrimac, the second stream of the state in volume, runs in a charming valley through the extreme northeast corner, and affords immensely valuable water-power at Lowell, Lawrence and Haverhill.
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  • Vast water-power is developed on the Merrimac at Lawrence and Lowell, and on the Connecticut at South Hadley, and to a less extent at scores of other cities on many streams and artificial ponds; many of the machines that have revolutionized industrial conditions since the beginning of the factory system have been invented by Massachusetts men; and the state contains various technical schools of great importance.
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  • He returned to America in 1840, was a tutor for a few months (1840-1841) at Bowdoin, and in 1842, shut out from any better place by distrust of his German training and by his frank opposition to Unitarianism, he became pastor of the Congregational Church of West Amesbury (now Merrimac), Massachusetts.
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  • The Amoskeag bridge over the Merrimac at Manchester, N.H., U.S.A., built in 1792, had 6 spans of 92 ft.
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  • The James river, afterwards so much used for the Federal operations, was not yet clear, and it was here, in Hampton Roads, that the famous fight took place between the ironclads "Merrimac" (or "Virginia") and "Monitor" (March 8-9, 1862).
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  • Between the Merrimac Valley and the sea is the only low surface in the state; a considerable portion of this region is less than 500 ft.
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  • The rivers with their numerous falls and the lakes with their high altitudes furnish a vast amount of water power for manufacturing, the Merrimac, in particular, into which many of the larger lakes, including Winnepesaukee, find an outlet, is one of the greatest power-yielding streams of the world.
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  • Fertile soil in New Hampshire is confined largely to the bottom-lands of the Merrimac and Connecticut rivers, where on deposits of glacial drift, which are generally quite deep in the southern half of the state, there is considerable alluvium.
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  • The valley of the Merrimac is the leading section for the production of hay, small fruits and dairy products.
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  • In the bottom lands of the Merrimac and of the Connecticut, south of the White Mountains, a large part of the Indian corn and vegetables is grown.
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  • Manufactures.-The heavy precipitation on the elevated central and northern parts, and the hundreds of lakes and ponds which serve as reservoirs, give to the lower southern part of the state on the Merrimac and other rivers such an abundant and constant water-power that southern New Hampshire has become an important manufacturing district, and manufacturing has become the leading industry of the state.
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  • The charter of that colony was drafted under the impression that the Merrimac flowed east for its entire course, but now an investigation was in progress which was to show that its source in Lake Winnepesaukee was several miles north of any of the four settlements in New Hampshire.
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  • Both parties then appealed to the king, and in 1741 the king in council confirmed the decision of the commission in regard to the eastern boundary and decided that the southern boundary should be a line corresponding to the course of the Merrimac from 3 m.
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  • A curious chain suspension bridge across the Merrimac, connecting Newburyport with Amesbury, was built in 1827, replacing a similar bridge built in 1810, which was one of the first suspension bridges in America.
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  • Here was constructed the iron-clad "Virginia" (the old "Merrimac"), which on the 9th of March 1862 fought in Hampton Roads the famous engagement with the "Monitor."
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  • The famous contest between the new ironclads "Monitor" and "Merrimac" (9th April), though indecisive, effectually stopped the career of the Confederate vessel, which was later destroyed by the Confederates themselves.
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  • Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated on the Merrimac river, about 6 m.
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  • In 1876 Merrimac township was created out of the territory of Amesbury; in 1886 the west part of the old township of Salisbury was united to Amesbury.
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  • In March 1622 Mason obtained from the Council for New England, of which Gorges was the most influential member, a grant of the territory (which he named Mariana) between the Naumkeag or Salem river and the Merrimac, and in the following August he and Gorges together received a grant of the region between the Merrimac and Kennebec rivers, and extending 60 m.
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  • Towards the close of 1629 Mason and Gorges agreed upon a division of the territory held jointly by them, and on the 7th of November 1629 Mason received from the Council a separate grant of the tract between the Merrimac and the Piscataqua, which he now named New Hampshire.
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  • The American Civil War, and the report that the Confederates were converting the "Merrimac" into an ironclad, caused the navy department to invite proposals for the construction of armoured ships.
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  • Among others, Ericsson replied, and as it was thought that his design might be serviceable in inland waters, the first armoured turret ship, the "Monitor," was ordered; she was launched on the 30th of January 1862, and on the 9th of March she fought the celebrated action with the Confederate ram "Merrimac."
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  • Though the battle between the two vessels was indecisive, its effect was to "neutralize" the "Merrimac," which had caused great alarm in Washington, and to prevent the breaking of the Federal blockade at Hampton Roads; in the history of naval warfare it may be regarded as marking the opening of a new era - the era of the armoured warship. On the 3rd of February 1865 near Fortress Monroe on board a steamer occurred the meeting of President Lincoln and Secretary Seward with Confederate commissioners which is known as the Hampton Roads Conference (see Lincoln, Abraham).
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  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
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