Merchiston sentence example

merchiston
  • The first Napier of Merchiston, "Alexander Napare," acquired the Merchiston estate before the year 1438, from James I.
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  • His son, John Napier of Rusky, the third of Merchiston, belonged to the royal household in the lifetime of his father.
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  • He also was provost of Edinburgh at various times, and it is a remarkable instance of the esteem in which the lairds of Merchiston were held that three of them in immediate lineal succession repeatedly filled so important an office during perhaps the most memorable period in the history of the city.
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  • His eldest son, Archibald Napier of Edinbellie, the fourth of Merchiston, belonged to the household of James IV.
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  • He fought at Flodden and escaped with his life, but his eldest son Alexander, (fifth of Merchiston) was killed.
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  • Alexander's eldest son (Alexander, sixth of Merchiston) was born in 1513, and fell at the battle of Pinkie in 1547.
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  • His eldest son was Archibald, seventh of Merchiston, and the father of John Napier, the subject of this article.
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  • He did not, however, as has been supposed, spend the best years of his manhood abroad, for he was certainly at home in 1571, when the preliminaries of his marriage were arranged at Merchiston; and in 1572 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Stirling of Keir.
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  • A few years afterwards he married again, his second wife being Agnes, daughter of Sir James 1 The descent of the first Napier of Merchiston has been traced to "Johan le Naper del Counte de Dunbretan," who was one of those who swore fealty to Edward I.
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  • This committee consisted of six members, two barons, two ministers and two burgesses - the two barons selected being John Napier of Merchiston and James Maxwell of Calderwood.
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  • Briggs was greatly excited by Napier's invention and visited him at Merchiston in 1615, staying with him a whole month; he repeated his visit in 1616 and, as he states, "would have been glad to make him a third visit if it had pleased God to spare him so long."
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  • Of this singular contract, which is signed, "Robert Logane of Restalrige" and "Jhone Neper, Fear of Merchiston," and is dated July 1594, a facsimile is given in Mark Napier's Memoirs.
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  • Among the Merchiston papers is a thin quarto volume in Robert Napier's writing containing a digest of the principles of alchemy; it is addressed to his son, and on the first leaf there are directions that it is to remain in his charter-chest and be kept secret except from a few.
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  • The form "Neper" is the oldest, as John, third Napier of Merchiston, so spelt it in the 15th century.
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  • Napier frequently signed his name "Jhone Neper, Fear of Merchiston."
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  • Merchiston Academy, housed in the old castle of Napier, the inventor of logarithms, is another institution conducted on English public school lines.
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  • William Lilly's account of the meeting of Napier and Briggs at Merchiston is quoted in the article NA Pier.
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  • The leading public schools on the English model are Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire; Loretto School, Musselburgh, and Fettes College, Merchiston Castle and the Academy inEdinburgh.
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  • W., being the site of a Roman settlement; Merchiston Hall, to the N.W., was the birthplace of Admiral Sir Charles Napier.
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  • Additional probability is given to Hume's assertion by the fact that Merchiston is situated in St Cuthbert's parish.
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  • The hereditary office of king's poulterer (Pultrie Regis) was for many generations in the family of Merchiston, and descended to John Napier.
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  • He was "Fear of Merchiston" because, more majorum, he had been invested with the fee of his paternal barony during the lifetime of his father, who retained the liferent.
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  • He has been sometimes erroneously called "Peer of Merchiston," and in the 1645 edition of the Flamm Discovery he is so styled (see Mark Napier's Memoirs, pp. 9 and 173, and Libri qui supersunt, p. xciv.).
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  • We may infer therefore that as early as 1594 Napier had communicated to some one, probably John Craig, his hope of being able to effect a simplification in the processes of arithmetic. Everything tends to show that the invention of logarithms 2 See Mark Napier's Memoirs of John Napier of Merchiston (1834), p. 362.
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