Mattioli sentence example

mattioli
  • The "man in the mask" was either (1) Count Mattioli, who became the prisoner of Saint-Mars at Pignerol in 1679, or (2) the person called Eustache Dauger, who was imprisoned in July 1669 in the same fortress.
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  • But while we know who Mattioli was, and why he was imprisoned, a further question still remains for supporters of Dauger, because his identity and the reason for his incarceration are quite obscure.
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  • But Jung's arguments, though strong destructively against the Mattioli theory, break down as regards any valid proof either that the prisoner arrested at Peronne was a Bastille prisoner in 1673 or that he was ever at Pignerol, where indeed we find no trace of him.
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  • But on the eve of the occupation of Casale by the French, Mattioli - actuated by a tardy sense of patriotism or by the hope of further gain - betrayed the transaction to the governments of Austria, Spain, Venice and Savoy.
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  • This kidnapping of Mattioli, however, was no secret, and it was openly discussed in La Prudenza trionfante di Casale (Cologne, 1682), where it was stated that Mattioli was masked when he was arrested.
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  • When Saint-Mars was made governor of Exiles in 1681 we know from one of his letters that Mattioli was left at Pignerol; but in March 1694, Pignerol being about to be given up by France to Savoy, he and two other prisoners were removed with much secrecy to Ste Marguerite, where Saint-Mars had been governor since 1687.
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  • Now Mattioli undoubtedly had a valet at Pignerol, and nobody else at Ste Marguerite is known at this time to have had one; so that he may well have been the prisoner who died.
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  • In any case the age stated in the burial register, "about 45," was fictitious, whether for Mattioli (63) or Dauger (at least 53) and, as Lair points out, Saint-Mars is known to have given false names at the burial of other prisoners.
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  • Monsignor Barnes, in The Man of the Mask (1908), takes the entry "Marchioly" as making it certain that the prisoner was not Mattioli, on the ground (r) that the law explicitly ordered a false name to be given, and (2) that after hiding his identity so carefully the authorities were not likely to give away the secret by means of a burial register.
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  • In spite of Funck-Brentano it appears practically certain that Mattioli must be ruled out.
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  • If he was the individual who died in 1703 at the Bastille, the obscurity which gathered round the nameless masked prisoner is almost incomprehensible, for there was no real secret about Mattioli's incarceration.
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  • Any one who accepts the Mattioli theory must be driven, as Lang suggests, to suppose that the mystery which grew up about the unknown prisoner was somehow transferred to Mattioli from Dauger.
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  • When Saint-Mars is transferred to Exiles, he is ordered to take these two with him, as too important to be in other hands; Mattioli is left behind.
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  • In 1691 Louvois's successor, Barbezieux, writes to him about his "prisonnier de vingt ans" (Dauger was first imprisoned in 1669, Mattioli in 1679), and Saint-Mars replies that "nobody has seen him but myself."
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  • Mattioli's prison name was Lestang.
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  • There is at least good ground for supposing Mattioli's death to have been indicated in 1694, but nothing is known that would imply Dauger's, unless it was he who died in 1703.
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  • Here we find not only sufficient indication of the growth of a legend as to Dauger, but also the existence in fact of a real mystery as to who he was and what he had done, two things both absent in Mattioli's case.
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  • Funck-Brentano also insists that the references to the "ancien prisonnier" in 1696 and 1697 must be to Mattioli, giving ancien the meaning of "late" or "former" (as in the phrase "ancien ministre"), and regarding it as an expression pertinent to Mattioli, who had been at Pignerol with Saint-Mars but not at Exiles, and not to Dauger, who had always been with SaintMars.
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  • FunckBrentano's attempt to prove that Mattioli did not die in 1694 is far from convincing; but the assumption that he did is inferential, and to that extent arguable.
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