Marya sentence example

marya
  • His most celebrated pieces are Hugo; Mnich (" The Monk"); Lambro, a Greek corsair, quite in the style of Byron; Anhelli, a very Dantesque poem expressing under the form of an allegory the sufferings of Poland; Krol duck (" The Spirit King"), another mysterious and allegorical poem; Waclaw, on the same subject as the Marya of Malczewski, to be afterwards noticed; Beniowski, a long poem in ottava rima on this strange adventurer, something in the style of Byron's humorous poems; Kordyan, of the same school as the English poet's Manfred; Lilla Weneda, a poem dealing with the early period of Slavonic history.
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  • Anton Malczewski (1793-1826) wrote one poem, Marya, a Ukrainian tale which passed School.
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  • Marya is a narrative in verse in the manner of Byron.
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  • Since the death of Asnyk and Ujejski the most prominent poet is Marya Konopnicka (1846).
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  • His last campaign (in 1690) was an utter failure, and the last years of his life were embittered by the violence and the intrigues of his dotingly beloved wife, Marya Kazimiera d'Arquien, by whom he had three sons, James, Alexander and Constantine.
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  • It was in July, 1805, and the speaker was the well-known Anna Pavlovna Scherer, maid of honor and favorite of the Empress Marya Fedorovna.
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  • He is a son of Marya Ivanovna Dolokhova, such a worthy woman, but there, just fancy!
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  • Marya Dmitrievna paused at the door.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna always spoke in Russian.
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  • At one end of the table sat the countess with Marya Dmitrievna on her right and Anna Mikhaylovna on her left, the other lady visitors were farther down.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna's deep voice suddenly inquired from the other end of the table.
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  • You know my son's going, Marya Dmitrievna?
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  • You may die in your bed or God may spare you in a battle, replied Marya Dmitrievna's deep voice, which easily carried the whole length of the table.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna shook her fat finger.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna and the countess burst out laughing, and all the guests joined in.
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  • First came Marya Dmitrievna and the count, both with merry countenances.
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  • What was expressed by the whole of the count's plump figure, in Marya Dmitrievna found expression only in her more and more beaming face and quivering nose.
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  • All were watching the count and Marya Dmitrievna.
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  • Marya Ignatevna Peronskaya, a thin and shallow maid of honor at the court of the Dowager Empress, who was a friend and relation of the countess and piloted the provincial Rostovs in Petersburg high society, was to accompany them to the ball.
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  • She is quite equal to Marya Antonovna.
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  • Yes, she is still the most beautiful of them all, our Marya Antonovna!
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  • The host followed with Marya Antonovna Naryshkina; then came ambassadors, ministers, and various generals, whom Peronskaya diligently named.
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  • Late one evening the Rostovs' four sleighs drove into Marya Dmitrievna's courtyard in the old Konyusheny street.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna lived alone.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna, with her spectacles hanging down on her nose and her head flung back, stood in the hall doorway looking with a stern, grim face at the new arrivals.
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  • When they came in to tea, having taken off their outdoor things and tidied themselves up after their journey, Marya Dmitrievna kissed them all in due order.
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  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna ordered almost the whole trousseau.
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  • Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna, who knew how the prince had received the Rostovs, pretended not to notice how upset Natasha was and jested resolutely and loudly at table with the count and the other guests.
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  • That evening the Rostovs went to the Opera, for which Marya Dmitrievna had taken a box.
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  • Natasha did not want to go, but could not refuse Marya Dmitrievna's kind offer which was intended expressly for her.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna talked to the count about something which they concealed from Natasha.
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  • On Sunday morning Marya Dmitrievna invited her visitors to Mass at her parish church--the Church of the Assumption built over the graves of victims of the plague.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna liked Sundays and knew how to keep them.
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  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna appeared, and they were called to breakfast.
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  • After breakfast, which was her best time, Marya Dmitrievna sat down in her armchair and called Natasha and the count to her.
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  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.
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  • That evening Marya Dmitrievna was going to the Akharovs' and proposed to take the girls with her.
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  • On the day the count left, Sonya and Natasha were invited to a big dinner party at the Karagins', and Marya Dmitrievna took them there.
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  • To tell Marya Dmitrievna who had such faith in Natasha seemed to Sonya terrible.
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  • He was met by Gabriel, Marya Dmitrievna's gigantic footman.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna, having found Sonya weeping in the corridor, made her confess everything, and intercepting the note to Natasha she read it and went into Natasha's room with it in her hand.
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  • She was in just the same position in which Marya Dmitrievna had left her.
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  • Very nice! said Marya Dmitrievna.
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  • And Marya Dmitrievna touched her arm.
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  • Both Marya Dmitrievna and Sonya were amazed when they saw how Natasha looked.
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  • I shall die! she muttered, wrenching herself from Marya Dmitrievna's hands with a vicious effort and sinking down again into her former position.
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  • Who asked you to? shouted Natasha, raising herself on the sofa and looking malignantly at Marya Dmitrievna.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna confirmed Natasha's assurances that nothing had happened.
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  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
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  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
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  • And what can they want with me? thought he as he dressed to go to Marya Dmitrievna's.
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  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.
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  • After hearing the details of Anatole's marriage from Pierre, and giving vent to her anger against Anatole in words of abuse, Marya Dmitrievna told Pierre why she had sent for him.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna is with her and she too asks you to come.
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  • Natasha, pale and stern, was sitting beside Marya Dmitrievna, and her eyes, glittering feverishly, met Pierre with a questioning look the moment he entered.
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  • Pierre drove to Marya Dmitrievna's to tell her of the fulfillment of her wish that Kuragin should be banished from Moscow.
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  • Natasha was in bed, the count at the club, and Pierre, after giving the letters to Sonya, went to Marya Dmitrievna who was interested to know how Prince Andrew had taken the news.
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  • Ten minutes later Sonya came to Marya Dmitrievna.
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  • Marya Dmitrievna only shrugged her shoulders.
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  • Only Marya Dmitrievna Akhrosimova, who had come to Petersburg that summer to see one of her sons, allowed herself plainly to express an opinion contrary to the general one.
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  • It is done in all the brothels, and with these words Marya Dmitrievna, turning up her wide sleeves with her usual threatening gesture and glancing sternly round, moved across the room.
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  • Though people were afraid of Marya Dmitrievna she was regarded in Petersburg as a buffoon, and so of what she had said they only noticed, and repeated in a whisper, the one coarse word she had used, supposing the whole sting of her remark to lie in that word.
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  • In Petersburg at that time a complicated struggle was being carried on with greater heat than ever in the highest circles, between the parties of Rumyantsev, the French, Marya Fedorovna, the Tsarevich, and others, drowned as usual by the buzzing of the court drones.
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