Marcion sentence example

marcion
  • It purports to be by Paul, and was held to be his by Marcion and in the Muratorian canon, and by Irenaeus, Tertullian and Clement of Alexandria, all writing at the end of the 2nd century.
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  • The earlier fathers, Irenaeus, Hippolytus, Tertullian, believed in chiliasm simply because it was a part of the tradition of the church and because Marcion and the Gnostics would have nothing to do with it.
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  • The brevity of the note and its lack of doctrinal significance prevented it from gaining frequent quotation in the early Christian literature, but it appears in Marcion's canon as well as in the Muratorian, whilst Tertullian mentions, and Origen expressly quotes it.
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  • There are many references in Tertullian to the teaching of the Gnostic Marcion, whose breach with the Roman Church may be dated A.D.
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  • In his revised New Testament Marcion speaks of " the covenant which is the mother of us all, which begets us in the holy Church, to which we have vowed allegiance."
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  • 1 McGiffert, on the other hand, argues that the Roman Creed was composed to meet the errors of Marcion, p. 58 ff.
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  • To this principle Marcion's Pauline Canon is a witness, though in too one-sided a spirit.
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  • The views of the Gnostics, and of Marcion as well, seemed to the majority of Christians destructive of the gospel, and it was widely felt that they were too dangerous to be tolerated.
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  • But it is highly probable that the collection went back a full generation before Marcion.
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  • This is the general view of the Church of his time, except the little clique known as the Alogi who rejected the Fourth Gospel, and Marcion who only recognized St Luke.
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  • There are many indications early in the 2nd century of a tendency towards the recognition of a single Gospel; for instance, there are the local Gospels according to Hebrews, according to Egyptians; Marcion had but one Gospel, St Luke, the Valentinians preferred St John and so on; Tatian reduced the Four Gospels to one by means of a Harmony, and it is possible that something of the kind may have existed before he did this.
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  • The list recognized four Gospels, Acts, thirteen epistles of Paul, two epistles of John, Jude, Apocalypse of John and (as the text stands) of Peter; there is no mention of Hebrews or (apparently) of 3 John or Epistles of Peter, where it is possible - we cannot say more - that the silence as to t Peter is accidental; the Shepherd of Hermas on account of its date is admitted to private, but not public, reading; various writings associated with Marcion, Valentinus, Basilides and Montanus are condemned.
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  • All writers earlier than the 5th century are valuable, but particularly important are the following groups: (1) Greek writers in the West, especially Justin Martyr, Tatian, Marcion, Irenaeus and Hippolytus; (2) Latin writers in Italy, especially Novatian, the author of the de Rebaptismate and Ambrosiaster; (3) Latin writers in Africa, especially Tertullian and Cyprian; (4) Greek writers in Alexandria, especially Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Athanasius and Cyril; (5) Greek writers in the East, especially Methodius of Lycia and Eusebius of Caesarea; (6) Syriac writers, especially Aphraates and Ephraem; it is doubtful whether the Diatessaron of Tatian ought to be reckoned in this group or in (1).
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  • The Apotheosis and Hamartigenia are polemic, the first against the disclaimers of the divinity of Christ, the latter against the gnostic dualism of Marcion and his followers.
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  • The true Basilides, perhaps also Satornil, Marcion and a part of his disciples, Bardesanes and others, were frankly dualists.
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  • The Gnostic Marcion has been rightly characterized as a direct disciple of Paul.
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  • Finally, apart from all other Gnostics stands Marcion.
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  • Between these two powers Marcion affirms a sharp and, as it appears, originally irreconcilable dualism which with him rests moreover on a speculative basis.
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  • Thanks to the noble simplicity and specifically religious character of his ideas, Marcion was able to found not only schools, but a community, a church of his own, which gave trouble to the Church longer than any other Gnostic sect.
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  • So Marcion argued that Christ's body was not really flesh and blood, or he could not have called it bread and wine.
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  • Absent from Marcion's canon, they were included in the Muratorian, where they appear as private letters ("pro affectu et dilectione").
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  • There is a mention of Marcion in the same context, but it is unintelligible.
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  • This presentation of it as an ethical system of universal import was the joint work of Paul and Marcion.
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  • We may thus hope to recover some priceless monuments of early Christianity, hymns and treatises perhaps of Marcion and Bardesanes, the Gospel of Peter, and even the Diatessaron.
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  • Not only was he master of the contents of the Bible: he also read carefully the works of Hermas, Justin, Tatian, Miltiades, Melito, Irenaeus, Proculus, Clement, as well as many Gnostic treatises, the writings of Marcion in particular.
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  • 3) was common to Marcion and Apelles, while the injunction of fasting $ is attributed to the Encratites (Iren.
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  • In pictures and sculptures of the 15th century and earlier, we often find represented this idea, originated by Marcion in the 2nd century.
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  • Among his other publications are: A Dialogue between a Christian and a Jew (1888); a translation (with introduction and notes) of Eusebius's Church History (1890); and The Apostles' Creed (1902), in which he attempted to prove that the old Roman creed was formulated as a protest against the dualism of Marcion and his denial of the reality of Jesus's life on earth.
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  • The heretic Marcion taught a variant, namely, the existence of two Gods, one of the Old Testament of law, the other of the New Testament of grace.
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  • From Anselm's time (12th century A.D.) this theory of Marcion's is held as orthodox in substance but is made monotheistic in form.
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  • As evidence for the Third Gospel holds equally for Acts, its existence in Marcion's day (120-140) is now assured.
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  • He regarded it as his special task to combat the views of Marcion, of Bardaisan and of Mani.
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  • The earliest allusion to the epistle 11 is the notice of its inclusion in Marcion's canon, but almost verbal echoes of iii.
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  • Marc. 2-4) removed what he judged to be some interpolations, but van Manen's attempt to prove that Marcion's text is more original than the canonical (Theolog.
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  • The pure gospel, however, Marcion found to be everywhere more or less corrupted and mutilated in the Christian circles of his time.
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  • This reformation was to deliver Christendom from false Jewish doctrines by restoring the Pauline conception of the gospel, - Paul being, according to Marcion, the only apostle who had.
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  • In Marcion's own view, therefore, the founding of his church - to which he was first driven by opposition - amounts to a reformation of Christendom through a return to the gospel of Christ and to Paul; nothing was to be accepted beyond that.
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  • This of itself shows that it is a mistake to reckon Marcion among the Gnostics.
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  • It is true that in many features his Christian system - if we may use the expression - resembles the so-called Gnostic systems; but the first duty of the historian is to point out what Marcion plainly aimed at; only in the second place *have we to inquire how far the result corresponded with those purposes.
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  • The doctrines of Marcion and the history of his churches from the and to the 7th century are known to us from the controversial works of the Catholic fathers.
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  • From Justin onwards, almost every eminent Church teacher takes some notice of Marcion, while very many write extensive treatises against him.
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  • From these works the contents of the Marcionite Gospel, and also the text of Paul's epistles in Marcion's recension, can be settled with tolerable accuracy.
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  • His opponents, moreover, have preserved some expressions of his, with extracts from his principal work; so that our knowledge of Marcion's views is in part derived from the best sources.
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  • Marcion was a wealthy shipowner, belonging to Sinope in Pontus.
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  • Marcion took up his residence permanently in Rome, but still undertook journeys for the propagation of his opinions.
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  • Still Marcion seems never to have abandoned his design of gaining over the whole Church to his gospel.
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  • The distinctive teaching of Marcion originated in a comparison of the Old Testament with the gospel of Christ and the theology of the apostle Paul.
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  • Overpowered by the majesty and novelty of the Christian message of salvation, too conscientious to rest satisfied with the ordinary attempts at the solution of difficulties, while prevented by the limitations of his time from reaching an historical insight into the relation of Christianity to the Old Testament and to Judaism, he believed that he expressed Paul's view by the 1 Esnik's presentation of the Marcionite system is a late production, and contains many speculations that cannot be charged upon Marcion himself.
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  • Paradoxes in the history of religion and revelation which Paul draws out, and which Marcion's contemporaries passed by as utterly incomprehensible, are here made the foundation of an ethico-dualistic conception of history and of religion.
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  • It may be said that in the and century only one Christian - Marcion - took the trouble to understand Paul; but it must be added that he misunderstood him.
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  • Marcion alone perceived their decisive religious importance, and with them confronted the legalizing, and in this sense judaizing, tendencies of his Christian contemporaries.
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  • Under the influence of Cerdo, Marcion carried out his ethical dualism in the sphere of cosmology; but the fact that his system is not free from contradictions is the best proof that all along religious knowledge, and not philosophical, had the chief values in his eyes.
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  • He sent his Son (whom Marcion probably regarded as a manifestation of the supreme God Himself) 3 down to this earth in order to redeem men.
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  • Marcion himself was the next raised up by the good God, to proclaim once more the true gospel.
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  • This he did by setting aside the spurious gospels, purging the real gospel (the Gospel of Luke) from supposed judaizing interpolations, and restoring the true text of 2 On the relation of matter to the Creator, Marcion himself seems not to have speculated, though his followers may have done so.
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  • On the basis of these writings Marcion proclaimed the true Christianity, and founded churches.
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  • But he taught further - and here we trace the influence of the current gnosticism on Marcion - that only the spirit of man is saved by the good God; the body, because material, perishes.
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  • For, since, according to Marcion, the spirit of man is derived, not from the good, but from the just God, it is impossible to see why the spiritual should yet be more closely related to the good God than the material.
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  • According to Marcion, the good God never judges, but everywhere manifests His goodness - is, therefore, not to be feared, but simply to be loved, as a father.
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  • Marcion answers, The good God does not judge them, but merely removes them from His presence.
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  • No, says Marcion, but on the contrary - punishes them in his hell !
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  • It is not surprising, therefore, that even in the 2nd century the disciples of Marcion diverged in several directions.
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  • But it was unquestionably from Marcionite impulses that the new sects of the Paulicians and Bogomils arose; and in so far as the western Cathari, and the antinomian and anticlerical sects ' Marcion was the earliest critical student of the New Testament canon and text.
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  • Foakes Jackson's Christian Difficulties of the Second and Twentieth Centuries, is a study of Marcion and his relation to modern thought.
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  • Most of what the Fathers narrate of Cerdo's tenets has probably been transferred to him from his famous pupil Marcion, like whom he is said to have rejected the Old Testament and the New, except part of Luke's Gospel and of Paul's Epistles.
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  • (See MARCION, and GNOSTICISM.)
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  • After Menander Justin proceeds to speak of Marcion, who was still teaching at the time.
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  • The followers of Simon Magus, of Menander and of Marcion, he says, were all called Christians, but so also Epicureans and Stoics were alike called philosophers.
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  • He puts Simon after Marcion, and yet refers in the same breath to his acceptance of Peter's preaching.
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  • There are other features in the portrait which remind us strongly of Marcion.
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  • To this class belonged Dositheus, Saturninus, Cerdo, Marcion and their followers, the Ophites, Manichaeans and others.
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  • Marcion, for example, regarded the body of Christ merely as an "umbra," a "phantasms."
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  • Tertullian and others attest this custom among the followers of Cerinthus and Marcion.
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  • While they did not delimit the canon as Marcion did, the Gnostics also performed a catalytic function in the formation of the canon.
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  • One of the first heretics went by the name of Marcion.
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  • It is true that certain heretics in the 2nd century like Marcion rejected them.
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  • Marcion and His Theology Marcion was a native of Pontus, born late in the first century, who became a wealthy shipowner.
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  • Such an identification doubtless led Marcion to alter the title in his copies.
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  • An attempt has been made in some quarters to prove that certain allusions in the epistle imply the rise of the heresy of Marcion and that it cannot therefore be placed earlier than 140.
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  • Marcion's reaction, too, against the Judaic temper in the Church as a whole, in the interests of an extravagant Paulinism, while it suggests that Paul's doctrines of grace generally were inadequately realized in the sub-apostolic age, points also to the prevalence of such moralism in particular.
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  • This distinction agrees with that made by the gnostic Basilides no less strikingly than the Manichaean criticism of the Old Testament does with that propounded by the Marcionites (see the Acta Archelai, in which Mani is made to utter the antitheses of Marcion).
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