Mannhardt sentence example

mannhardt
  • At the festival Chthonia, a cow (representing, according to Mannhardt, the spirit of vegetation), which voluntarily presented itself, was sacrificed by three old women.
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  • The union of Poseidon and Demeter is thus explained by Mannhardt.
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  • Mannhardt collected a mass of information proving that the life of the corn is supposed to exist apart from the corn itself and to take the form, sometimes of an animal, sometimes of a man or woman, sometimes of a child.
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  • All over the world agricultural peoples practise elaborate ceremonies explicable, as Mannhardt has shown, on animistic principles.
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  • Mannhardt and others regard Odysseus as a solar or summer divinity, who withdraws to the underworld during the winter, and returns in spring to free his wife from the suitors (the powers of winter).
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  • The semi-personification of eiresione will be noticed; and, according to Mannhardt, the branch "embodies the tree-spirit conceived as the spirit of vegetation in general, whose vivifying and - fructifying influence is thus brought to bear upon the corn in particular."
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  • Mannhardt, and a lower stratum of beliefs and rites began to emerge into view beneath the poetic forms of the more developed mythologies.
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  • Mannhardt sees in the ceremony an allusion to certain agricultural rites, the object of which was to prevent the failure of the crops and to avert pestilence (or to protect them and the flocks against the ravages of wolves).
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  • The ceremony of the Adonia was intended as a charm to promote the growth of vegetation, the throwing of the gardens and images into the water being supposed to procure a supply of rain (for European parallels see Mannhardt).
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  • Mannhardt, and on the facts of ritual, which preserve these ideas and represent them in a kind of mystery plays.
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  • Mannhardt, who by comparing numerous examples of similar customs among other European peoples arrived at the conclusion that the rite was of extreme antiquity and of dramatic rather than sacrificial character, and that its object was possibly to procure rain; (2) that of Wissowa, who refuses to date it farther back than the latter half of the 3rd century B.C., and sees in it the yearly representation of an original sacrifice of twentyseven captive Greeks (taking Argei as a Latin form of 'Ap-yE701) by drowning in the Tiber.
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