Manin sentence example

manin
  • Venice; but on the 7th of July the assembly declared in favor of fusion with Piedmont, and Manin, who had been elected president resigned his powers to the royal com- Danicle Mania and missioners.
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  • Venice alone still held out; after Novara the Piedmontcse commissioners withdrew and Manin again took charge of the government.
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  • The decline of Mazzinis influence was accompanied by the rise of a new movement in favor of Italian unity under Victor Emmanuel, inspired by the Milanese marquis Giorgio New Pallavicini, who had spent 14 years in the Spielberg, Unio~lsi and by Manin, living in exile in Paris, both of them moveex-republicans who had become monarchists.
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  • The government resolved to offer no resistance to the conqueror, and the doge Lodovico Manin abdicated on the 12th of May 1797.
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  • In 1848 a revolution broke out and a provisional republican government under Daniele Manin maintained itself for a brief space.
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  • Among other modern thoroughfares, the Via di Circonvallazione a Monte, laid out since 1876 on the hills at the back of the town, leads by many curves from the Piazza Manin along the hill-tops westward, and finally descends into the Piazza Acquaverde; its entire length is traversed by an electric tramway, and it commands magnificent views of the town.
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  • After a good deal of fighting in Venetia, he joined Manin in Venice and took command of the defending army.
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  • When the city was forced by hunger to surrender to the Austrians, Pepe and Manin were among those excluded from the amnesty; he again went into exile and died in Turin in 1855.
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  • Among his minor works may be mentioned: - De la France, de son genie et de ses destinees (1847); Daniel Manin (1860), La Russie et l'Europe (1866); Etudes d'archeologie celtique (1872); Les Napoleon et les frontieres de la France (1874).
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  • He was the son of a converted Jew, who took the name of Manin because that patrician family stood sponsors to him, as the custom then was.
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  • The heroic but foolhardy attempt of the brothers Bandiera, Venetians who had served in the Austrian navy against the Neapolitan Bourbons in 1844, was the first event to cause an awakening of Venetian patriotism, and in 1847 Manin presented a petition to the Venetian congregation, a shadowy consultative assembly tolerated by Austria but without any power, informing the emperor of the wants of the nation.
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  • The Austrians soon lost all control of the city, the arsenal was seized by the revolutionists, and under the direction of Manin a civic guard and a provisional government were instituted.
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  • The Austrians evacuated Venice on the 26th of March, and Manin became president of the Venetian republic. He was already in favour of Italian unity, and though not anxious for annexation to Piedmont (he would have preferred to invoke French aid), he gave way to the will of the majority, and resigned his powers to the Piedmontese commissioners on the 7th of August.
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  • But after the Piedmontese defeats in Lombardy, and the armistice by which King Charles Albert abandoned Lombardy and Venetia to Austria, the Venetians attempted to lynch the royal commissioners, whose lives Manin saved with difficulty; an assembly was summoned, and a triumvirate formed with Manin at its head.
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  • Early in 1849 Manin was again chosen president of the republic, and conducted the defence of the city with great ability.
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  • Meanwhile the Austrian forces closed round the city; but Manin showed an astonishing power of organization, in which he was ably seconded by the Neapolitan general, Guglielmo Pepe.
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  • At last, on the 24th of August 1849, when all provisions and ammunition were exhausted, Manin, who had courted death in vain, succeeded in negotiating an honourable capitulation, on terms of amnesty to all save Manin himself, Pepe and some others, who were to go into exile.
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  • On the 27th Manin left Venice for ever on board a French ship. His wife died at Marseilles, and he himself reached Paris broken in health and almost destitute, having spent all his fortune for Venice.
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  • Manin was a man of the greatest honesty, and possessed genuinely statesmanlike qualities.
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  • In Venice the people, under the leadership of Manin, rose in arms and forced the military and civil governors (Counts Zichy and Palify) to sign a capitulation on the 22nd of March, after which the republic was proclaimed.
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  • On the 24th the city, reduced by famine, capitulated on favorable terms. Manin, Pepa and a few others were excluded from the amnesty and went into exile.
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