Manetho sentence example

manetho
  • It is instructive to observe in Egypt the form which old traditions have taken in Manetho (Maspero, Rec. de travaux, xxvii., 1905, 1.22 seq.); cf.
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  • The same fate has befallen the works of Berossus and Manetho, Eratosthenes and Apollodorus.
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  • Manetho, likewise a priest, living at Sebennytus in Lower Egypt in the 3rd century B.C., wrote in Greek a history of Egypt, with an account of its thirty dynasties of sovereigns, which he professed to have drawn from genuine archives in the keeping of the priests.
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  • Lists of kings found on the temple wall at Abydos, in the fragments of the Turin papyrus and elsewhere, have cleared up many doubtful points in the lists of Manetho, and at the same time, as Professor Petrie has pointed out, have proved to us how true a historian that much-discussed writer was.
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  • Manetho, it will be recalled, was the Egyptian who wrote the history of Egypt in Greek in the time of the Ptolemies.
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  • Until corroboration was found in the Egyptian inscriptions themselves, not only were Manetho's lists in doubt, but scepticism had been carried to the point of denying that Manetho himself had ever existed.
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  • Manetho correctly places the great Pyramid kings in Dynasty IV.
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  • In Egyptian the name of Cheops (Chemmisor Chembisin Diodorus Siculus, Suphis in Manetho) is spelt Hwfw (Khufu), but the pronunciation, in late times perhaps Khoouf, is uncertain.
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  • By Manetho his worship is said to have been instituted by Kaiechos of the Second Dynasty.
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  • He appears at the head of the lists not only in Herodotus and Manetho, but also in the native Turin Papyrus of Kings and the lists of Abydos, while the list of Sakkara begins with the sixth king of the 1st Dynasty, a fact which may throw some doubt on the supposed foundation of Memphis by Menes.
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  • After the end of the Old Kingdom Thebes grew from an obscure provincial town to be the seat of a strong line of princes who contended for supremacy with Heracleopolis and eventually triumphed in the XIth Dynasty of Manetho.
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  • (It may be that Josephus had it, not direct from Manetho's writings, but through the garbled version of some Alexandrine compiler.) In outline it is as follows.
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  • In Manetho's list of kings, the six above named (with many variations in detail) form the XVth dynasty, and are called "six foreign Phoenician kings."
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  • From the remains of fortifications there he argues that the Hyksos were uncivilized desert people, skilled in the use of the bow, and must thus have destroyed by their archery the Egyptian armies trained to fight hand-tohand; further;, that their hordes were centered in Syria, but were driven thence by a superior force in the East to take refuge in the islands and became a sea-power--whence the strange description "Hellenic" in Manetho, which most editors have corrected to CtXAoi, "others."
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  • They comprise fragments of the native historian Manetho, the descriptions of Egypt in Herodotus and Diodorus, the geographical accounts of Strabo and Ptolemy, the treatise of Plutarch on Isis and Osiris and other monographs or scattered notices of less importance.
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  • The latter were not wholly mythical personages, though they were regarded as demigods (Manetho calls them the dead, P~Kves); they have been shown to be none other than the dim rulers of the predynastic age.
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  • Manetho alone of all authorities offers a complete chronology from the 1st Dynasty to the XXXth.
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  • It seems, therefore, that the known texts of Manetho, serviceable as they have been in the reconstruction of Egyptian.
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  • Prob 160 3687 ably most of the reigns were short, as 000 3459 Manetho also decidedly indicates.
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  • Petrie considers that one of the kings buried at Abydos, provisionally called Nar-mer and whose real name may be Mer or Beza, preceded Menes; of him there are several inscribed records, notably a magnificent carved and inscribed remembered that even Manetho attributes to him ninety-four years; its length probably caused the ruin of the dynasty.
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  • In Manetho he is identified with Sesostris (see, above), but Senwosri I., and still more Senwosri III., have a better claim to this distinction.
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  • Manetho gives us the XIIIth (Diospolite) Dynasty, the XIVth (Xoite from Xois in Lower Egypt), the XVth and XVIth (Hyksos) and the XVIIth (Diospolite), but his names are lost except for the Hyksos kings.
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  • The Hyksos names can in some cases be recognized by their foreign aspect, the peculiar style of the scarabs on which they are engraved or by resemblances to those recorded in Manetho.
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  • Manetho says that the Hyksos (q.v.) gained Egypt without a blow.
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  • From this brief re-establishment of Persian dominion (counted by Manetho as Dynasty XXXI.) no document survives except one papyrus that appears to be dated in,the reign of Darius III.
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  • In Manetho, however, he occupied the place of the second Senwosri (formerly read Usertesen) of the XIIth Dynasty, and his name is now usually viewed as a corruption of Senwosri.
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  • Genealogies also pass from the bald verse, which was the vehicle for oral transmission, to such elaborate tables as those in which Manetho has preserved the dynasties of Egyptian Pharaohs.
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  • Manetho indicates marvellous crowding for the XIIIth and XIVth Dynasties, but it seems better to suggest a total duration of ~oo or 400 years for the whole period than to adopt Meyers estimate of about 210 years (see above, Chronology).
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