Mamun sentence example

mamun
  • Mamun now no longer hesitated to take the title of caliph.
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  • ' Abul Hassan Ali, al Reza, commonly known as Imam Reza, the eighth imam of the Shiites, a son of Musa al Kazim, the seventh imam, was the leader from whom the party of the Alids (Shiites) had such hopes under the caliphate of Mamun.
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  • To the Shiites he is a martyr, being believed to have been poisoned by Mamun.
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  • Under the caliphate of Mamun, Saman, a Persian noble of Balkh, who was a close friend of the Arab governor of Khorasan, Asad b.
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  • Abdallah, had four sons who rendered distinguished services to Mamun.
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  • Ptolemy were translated into Arabic, and in 827, in the reign of the caliph Abdullah al Mamun, an arc of the meridian was measured in the plain of Mesopotamia.
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  • - Idrisi (1154) the world by Abu Jafar Mahommed ben Musa of Khiva, the librarian of the caliph el Mamun (833), declares them to be superior to the maps of Ptolemy or Marinus, but maps of a later date by Istakhri (950) or Ibn al Wardi (1349) are certainly of a most rudimentary type.
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  • The suburb of Rusafa, on the eastern bank, sprang up almost immediately, and after the siege and capture of the round city by Mamun, in 814, this became the most important part of the capital.
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  • The period of the greatest prosperity of Bagdad was the period from its foundation until the death of Mamun, the successor of Harun, in 833.
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  • Depending on coloured tiles and gorgeous fabrics for their rich effects, nothing of the buildings of the times of Harun al-Rashid or Mamun, once counted so magnificent, have come down to us.
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  • With the rise of the Turkish body-guard under Mamun's successor, Mo`tassim, began the downfall of the Abbasid dynasty, and with it of the Abbasid capital, Bagdad.
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  • Under the rule of the Abbasids, Bagdad became the centre of scientific thought; physicians and astronomers from India and Syria flocked to their court; Greek and Indian manuscripts were translated (a work commenced by the Caliph Mamun (813-833) and ably continued by his successors); and in about a century the Arabs were placed in possession of the vast stores of Greek and Indian learning.
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  • Euclid's Elements were first translated in the reign of Harun-al-Rashid (786-809), and revised by the order of Mamun.
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  • The first notable Arabian mathematician was Mahommed ben Musa al-Khwarizmi, who flourished in the reign of Mamun.
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  • In the contest between the two sons of Harun al Rashid all Arabia sided with Mamun (812).
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  • At Bagdad, in the reign of Mamun (813-833), the son of Harun al-Rashid, philosophical works were translated by Syrian Christians from Greek into Syriac and from Syriac into Arabic. It was in his reign that Aristotle was first translated into Arabic, and, shortly afterwards, we have Syriac and Arabic renderings of commentators on Aristotle, and of portions of Plato, Hippocrates and Galen; while in the 10th century new translations of Aristotle and his commentators were produced by the Nestorian Christians.
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  • Hindustan he had to march north into Khwarizm (Khiva) against his brother-in-law Mamun, who had refused to acknowledge Mahmud's supremacy.
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  • The result was as usual, and Mahmud, having committed Khwarizm to a new ruler, one of Mamun's chief officers, returned to his capital.
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  • South of the Middengebergte, however, the northern affluents of the Batang Hari, the Seliti, Gumanti, Si Potar, Mamun and Pangean, at least those in the west, again run in longitudinal valleys.
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  • Towards the beginning of the 3rd Islamic century the practice of giving Egypt in fief to a governor was resumed by the caliph Mamun, who bestowed this privilege on Abdallgh b.
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  • The rebellion broke out repeatedly in the following years, and in 831 the Copts joined with the Arabs against the government; the state of affairs became so serious that the caliph Mamun himself visited Egypt, arriving at Fostat in February 832; his general Afshin fought a decisive battle with the rebels at Bgshard in the IJauf region, at which the Copts were compelled to surrender; the males were massacred and the women and children sold as slaves.
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  • Mansur, the second of the house, who transferred the seat of government to Bagdad, fought successfully against the peoples of Asia Minor, and the reigns of Harun al-Rashid (786-809) and Mamun (813833) were periods of extraordinary splendour.
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  • Harun further stipulated that Mamun should have as his share during the lifetime of his brother the government of the eastern part of the empire.
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  • The caliph's hope that Rafi` would submit on condition of receiving a free pardon was not fulfilled, and he resolved to set out himself to Khorasan, taking with him his second son Mamun.
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  • He even, in direct violation of Harun's will, led back the corps which was intended to occupy Khorasan under the authority of Mamun.
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  • Aware, however, that in thus acting he was making Mamun his irreconcilable enemy, he persuaded Amin to exclude Mamun from the succession.
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  • Mamun, on receiving his brother's invitation to go to Bagdad, was greatly perplexed; but his tutor and later vizier, Fadl b.
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  • Mamun resolved to hold out, and found pretexts for remaining in Khorasan.
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  • Amin, in anger, caused the will of his father, which, as we have seen, was preserved in the Ka`ba, to be destroyed, declared on his own authority that Mamun's rights of succession were forfeited, and caused the army to swear allegiance to his own son Musa, a child of five, on whom he bestowed the title of an-N atiq bil-Haqq (" he who speaks according to truth"), A.H.
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  • On hearing the news, Mamun, strong in the rightfulness of his claim, retaliated by suppressing the caliph's name in all public acts.
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  • Zobaida, the mother of the caliph, entreated Ali to treat Mamun kindly when he should have made him captive.
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  • Mamun, on his side, sent in all haste an army of less than 4000 men of his faithful Khorasanians, and entrusted their command to Tahir b.
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  • His head was sent to Mamun (September 813).
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  • Mamun hid his joy beneath a feigned display of sorrow.
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  • On the day following the death of Amin Tahir caused Mamun to be proclaimed at Bagdad, and promised in his name a general amnesty.
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  • Mamun was in no haste to remove to Bagdad, but continued to reside at Merv.
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  • The Alids seized on the elevation of Mamun as a pretext for fresh revolts.
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  • Sahl, but proceeded towards Mer y with the purpose of telling Mamun that the state of affairs was not as Fadl b.
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  • Fadl, informed of his intentions, filled the caliph's mind with distrust against the old general, so that when Harthama arrived Mamun had him cast into prison, where he died shortly afterwards.
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  • Sahl, called by them the Majuzi ("the Zoroastrian"), who had chosen Madain for his residence, and put at their head Mansur, a son of Mandi, who refused to assume the title of caliph, but consented to be Mamun's vicegerent instead of Hasan b.
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  • Meanwhile, at Merv, Mamun was adopting a decision which fell like a thunderbolt on the Abbasids.
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  • Musa, declared Mamun deposed, and elected his uncle, Ibrahim, son of Mandi, to the Caliphate.'
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  • The historians bring no open accusation against Mamun, but it seems clear that the opportune removal of these men was not due to chance.
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  • Mamun appointed an officer to act as his lieutenant, and wrote that he was coming to Bagdad in a short time.
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  • Mamun had found out also that the general uneasiness was largely due to his treatment of Harthama and Tahir, the latter having been put in a rebellious country without the men and the money to maintain his authority.
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  • Having taken all precautions, Mamun now made his solemn entry into Bagdad, but, to show that he came as a master, he still displayed for several days the green colours, though at last, at the request of Tahir, he consented to resume the black.
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  • 204 (August 819), the real reign of Mamun began, freed as he now was from the tutelage of Faell.
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  • When welcoming Tahir, Mamun bade him ask for any reward he might desire.
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  • Tahir was a special favourite of Mamun.
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  • The pseudo-caliph, Ibrahim, who, since Mamun's entry into Bagdad, had led a wandering life, was eventually arrested.
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  • But Mamun generously pardoned him, as well as Fadl b.
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  • Tranquillity being now everywhere re-established, Mamun gave himself up to science and literature.
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  • Mamun interested himself too in questions of religious dogma.
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  • Mamun, being at Tarsus, received from the governor of Bagdad the report of the tribunal, and ordered that the culprits should be sent off to him.
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  • The two successors of Mamun maintained the edicts - Ahmad b.
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  • Hanbal, who obstinately refused to yield, was flogged in the year 834 - but it seems that Motasim did not himself take much interest in the question, which perhaps he hardly understood, and that the prosecution of the inquisition by him was due in great part to the charge which was left him in Mamun's will.
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  • In spite of these manifold activities Mamun did not forget the hereditary enemy of Islam.
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  • In the years 830, 831 and 832 he made expeditions into Asia Minor with such success that Theophilus, the Greek emperor, sued for peace, which Mamun 1 Cf.
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  • Mamun was a man of rare qualities, and one of the best rulers of the whole dynasty after Mansur.
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  • Every year he had bought Turkish slaves, and had with him in the last expedition of Mamun a bodyguard of 3 000.
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  • From the year 821 onwards Mamun had tried in vain to bring them to submission.
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  • The numerous efforts of Mamun to put them down had been all in vain, and they were now in alliance with the Byzantine emperor.
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  • Therefore, in the year 835, Motasim made Afshin, a Turkish prince who had distinguished himself already in the days of Mamun, governor of Media, with orders to take the lead of the war against Babak.
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  • During his return the caliph was informed of a conspiracy in the army in favour of 'Abbas the son of Mamun, of which `Ojaif b.
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  • - His son Wathiq, who succeeded, though not in the least to be compared with Mamun, had yet in common with him a thirst for knowledge - perhaps curiosity would be a more appropriate term - which prompted him, as soon as he became caliph, to send the famous astronomer Mahommed b.
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  • The caliph also shared Mamun's intolerance on the doctrinal question of the uncreated Koran.
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  • The upper cadi Ibn abi Da`ud, the leader of the movement against orthodoxy, who had stood in great esteem with Mamun and had fulfilled his high office under the reigns of Motasim and Wathiq, had a stroke of paralysis in the year 848.
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  • The Samanids had been governors of Transoxiana from the time of Mamun, and after the fall of the Tahirids, had been confirmed in this office by the caliph.
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  • Haruns sons Amin and Mamun quarrelled over the succession; Amin became caliph, but Mamun by the aid of Tahir b.
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  • Soon after this, in 820 (205 A.IL), Thhir, who aided MamUn to wrest the caliphate from his brother AmIn, succeeded in establishing the first semiindependent Persian dynasty in Khorksgn, which was overthrown ~n 872 (259 All.) by the ~affrids.
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  • Mamun affected the profoundest grief, and, in order to disarm suspicion, appointed as his prime minister the brother of Fadl, Hasan b.
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