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malmesbury

malmesbury

malmesbury Sentence Examples

  • The Lower or Bristol Avon rises on the eastern slope of the Cotteswold Hills in Gloucestershire, collecting the waters of several streams south of Tetbury and east of Malmesbury.

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  • from Malmesbury.

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  • The final rupture seems to have arisen on the question of the declaration of "the armed neutrality of the North;" but we know that Potemkin and the English ambassador, James Harris (afterwards 1st earl of Malmesbury), were both working against him some time before that.

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  • The Fructidorian Directors contemptuously rejected the overtures for peace which Pitt had recently made through the medium of Lord Malmesbury at Lille; and they further illustrated their desire for war and plunder by initiating a forward policy in central Italy and Switzerland which opened up a new cycle of war.

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  • That found in the works of William of Malmesbury (Hardy's ed.

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  • William of Malmesbury, about 1125, already treats Tinchebrai (1r06) as an English victory and the revenge for Hastings.

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  • Rule, Rolls Series, 1884); William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum and Historia novella (ed.

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  • Thus a well-marked depression in the Cotteswolds brings the head of the (Gloucestershire) Coln, one of the head-streams of the Thames, very close to that of the Isborne, a tributary of the upper Avon; the parting between the headstreams of the Thames and the Bristol Avon sinks at one point, near Malmesbury, below 300 ft.; and head-streams of the Great Ouse rise little more than two miles from, and only some 300 ft.

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  • But most notable is the Saxon church of St Lawrence, the foundation of which is generally attributed, according to William of Malmesbury (1125), to St Aldhelm, early in the 8th century.

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  • Thorpe, "Rolls" series, 2 vols., 1861, and also C. Plummer, 2 vols., Oxford, 1892-1899); William of Malmesbury's De gestis regum (ed.

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  • A few years later William of Malmesbury adds a love adventure at Cordova, a compact with the devil, the story of a speaking statue that foretold Gerbert's death at Jerusalem - a prophecy fulfilled, somewhat as in the case of Henry IV.

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  • (3) William of Malmesbury (De gestis pontificum anglorum, ed.

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  • Hamilton, Rolls Series, 1870, p. 406) suggested that he was abbot of Malmesbury and bishop of Crediton.

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  • Among the most notable examples of his work for the Rolls series are the prefaces to Roger of Hoveden, the Gesta regum of William of Malmesbury, the Gesta Henrici II., and the Memorials of St.

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  • JOHN AUBREY (1626-1697), English antiquary, was born at Easton Pierse or Percy, near Malmesbury, Wiltshire, on the 12th of March 1626, his father being a country gentleman of considerable fortune.

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  • He was educated at the Malmesbury grammar school under Robert Latimer, who had numbered Thomas Hobbes among his earlier pupils, and at his schoolmaster's house Aubrey first met the philosopher about whom he was to leave so many curious and interesting details.

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  • Beside the works already mentioned, his papers included: "Architectonica Sacra," notes on ecclesiastical antiquities; and "Life of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury," which served as the basis of Dr Blackburn's Latin life, and also of Wood's account.

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  • Ethelstan died at Gloucester in 940, and was buried at Malmesbury, an abbey which he had munificently endowed during his lifetime.

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  • Primary: The Saxon Chronicle, sub ann.; William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum, i.

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  • Stubbs, Rolls Series); William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum (ed.

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  • Four of the medieval historians from whom he quotes most frequently are Sigebert of Gembloux, Hugh of Fleury, Helinand of Froidmont, and William of Malmesbury, whom he uses for Continental as well as for English history.

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  • There was some talk of inducing d J Y Th f i $ g Glad stone to join the Tory government, and on the 29th of November Lord Malmesbury dubiously remarked, " I cannot make out Gladstone, who seems to me a dark horse."

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  • The first mention of his name is in a passage of William of Malmesbury, recording the discovery of his tomb in the province of Ros in Wales.

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  • Round, Feudal England; and, for original authorities, the works of Orderic Vitalis and William of Poitiers, and of Florence of Worcester; the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum, and Lanfranc's works, ed.

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  • 823, 894, 9 0 4, 9 1 3, 9 21, 994; William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum, Rolls Series (ed.

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  • William of Malmesbury mentions the existence of a bridge in 994 J.

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  • The life was largely used by subsequent chroniclers, among others by Florence of Worcester, Simeon of Durham, Roger of Hoveden, and William of Malmesbury.

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  • le Prevost, Paris, 1845); the first continuation of Symeon's Historia Ecclesiae Dunelmensis (Rolls ed., 1882); William of Malmesbury in the Gesta pontificum (Rolls ed., 1870); and the Peterborough Chronicle (Rolls ed., 1861).

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  • 901), of whom William of Malmesbury writes (Gesta Regum Anglorum, ii.

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  • MALMESBURY, a market town and municipal borough in the Chippenham parliamentary division of Wiltshire, England, 941 m.

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  • Malmesbury has an agricultural trade, with breweries, tanneries and manufactures of silk and pillow lace.

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  • Maildulphus, a Scottish or Irish monk, who came into England about 635, built a hermitage near the site of the modern Malmesbury (Maildulphi-urbs, Maldelmesburh, Malmesbiri) and gathered disciples round him, thus forming the nucleus of the later abbey of which Aldhelm his pupil became the first abbot.

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  • Round the abbey the town of Malmesbury grew up, and by the time of the Domesday Survey it had become one of the only two Wiltshire boroughs.

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  • The castle built at Malmesbury during the reign of Henry I.

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  • It was not incorporated, however, until 1645, when it was made a free borough under the title of "aldermen and burgesses of the borough of Malmesbury, County Wilts."

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  • In the middle ages Malmesbury possessed a considerable cloth manufacture, and at the Dissolution the abbey was bought by a rich clothier and fitted with looms for weaving.

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  • The earliest church altars were certainly made of wood; and it would appear from a passage in William of Malmesbury (De Gest.

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  • When William of Malmesbury describes the knighting of Athelstan by his grandfather Alfred the Great, that is, his investiture " with a purple garment set with gems and a Saxon sword with a golden sheath," there is no hint of any religious observance.

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  • According to William of Malmesbury the church was founded by St Aldhelm in the 7th century.

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  • THOMAS HOBBES (1588-1679), English philosopher, second son of Thomas Hobbes, was born at Westport (now part of Malmesbury, Wiltshire) on the 5th of April 1588.

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  • His father, vicar of Charlton and Westport, an illiterate and choleric man, quarrelled, it is said, with a brother clergyman at the church door, and was forced to decamp, leaving his three children to the care of an elder brother Francis, a flourishing glover at Malmesbury.

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  • Thomas Hobbes was put to school at Westport church at the age of four, passed to the Malmesbury school at eight, and was taught again in Westport later at a private school kept by a young man named Robert Latimer, fresh from Oxford and " a good Grecian."

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  • Original: William of Malmesbury, De gestis regum; the Gesta Stephani.

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  • He was employed in diplomatic business at the Hague in 1784; and in 1797 he accompanied Lord Malmesbury to Lille as secretary to the embassy.

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  • 4 Of his grandson Athelstan it is related by William of Malmesbury that after the victory of Brunanburgh he imposed upon the vanquished king of Wales a yearly tribute, which included a certain number of "hawks and sharp-scented dogs fit for hunting wild beasts."

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  • William of Malmesbury, again, when relating the crusade of Count Robert of Normandy (1096), transfers into his Gesta regum anglorum (iv.

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  • William of Malmesbury (De gest.

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  • On the other hand, William of Malmesbury prefers to read Heruligena, which would make Scotus a Pannonian, while Bale says he was born at St David's, Dempster connects him with Ayr, and Gale with Eriuven in Hereford.

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  • William of Malmesbury's amusing story illustrates both the character of Scotus and the position he occupied at the French court.

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  • The story that in 882 he was invited to Oxford by Alfred the Great, that he laboured there for many years, became abbot at Malmesbury, and was stabbed to death by his pupils with their "styles," is apparently without any satisfactory foundation, and doubtless refers to some other Johannes.

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  • The story of Scyld is related, with some details not found in Beowulf, by William of Malmesbury, and, less fully, by the loth-century English historian Ethelwerd, though it is told not of Scyld himself, but of his father Sceaf.

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  • The position of Sceldwea and Beaw (in Malmesbury's Latin called Sceldius and Beowius) in the genealogy as anterior to Woden would not of itself prove that they belong to divine mythology and not to heroic legend.

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  • William of Malmesbury gives a letter to Justus of the year 625, in which Canterbury is constituted the metropolitan see of Britain for ever.

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  • and the English Monasteries (1906), and The Last Abbot of Glastonbury (1895 and 1908); William of Malmesbury, "De antiq.

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  • WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY (c. lobo-c. 1143), English historian of the 12th century, was born about the year 1080, in the south country.

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  • He had French as well as English blood in his veins, but he appears to have spent his whole life in England, and the best years of it as a monk at Malmesbury.

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  • The education which he received at Malmesbury included a smattering of logic and physics; but moral philosophy and history, especially the latter, were the subjects to which he devoted most attention.

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  • William also formed an acquaintance with Bishop Roger of Salisbury, who had a castle at Malmesbury.

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  • It may have been due to these friends that he was offered the abbacy of Malmesbury in 1140.

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  • This work, like the Gesta regum, contains five books; the fifth relates the life and miracles of St Aldhelm of Malmesbury, and is based upon the biography by Abbot Faricius; it is less useful than books i.-iv., which are of the greatest value to the ecclesiastical historian.

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  • The historical works of William of Malmesbury were edited by Savile in his Scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596); but the text of that edition is full of errors.

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  • Through the interest of his guardians Lord Malmesbury and Lord Chichester, the duke of Portland made him one of the junior lords of the Admiralty on the formation of his administration in 1807.

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  • It may here be mentioned, as a remarkable instance of his foresight, that Palmerston told Lord Malmesbury, on his accession to the foreign office in 1858, that the chief reason of his opposition to the canal was this: he believed that, if the canal was made and proved successful, Great Britain, as the first mercantile state, and that most closely connected with the East, would be the power most interested in it; that England would therefore be drawn irresistibly into a more direct interference in Egypt, which it was desirable to avoid because England had already enough upon her hands, and because intervention might lead to a rupture with France.

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  • Thorpe (London, 1848-1849); William of Malmesbury, De testis Pontificum Anglorum, edited by N.

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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.

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  • This tradition - which is given only as such by Malmesbury himself - is not confirmed, and there is no mention of it in either Gildas or Bede.

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  • The rocks have been greatly changed by pressure in most cases and by the intrusion of great masses of igneous material, the Namaqualand schists and Malmesbury beds being most altered.

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  • They rest indifferently on the Ibiquas series or Malmesbury beds.

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  • Of the other towns Somerset West (2613), Somerset West Strand (3059), Stellenbosch (4969), Paarl (11,293), Wellington (4881), Ceres (2410), Malmesbury (3811), Caledon (3508), Worcester (7885), Robertson (3244) and Swellendam (2406) are named in the order of proximity to Cape Town, from which Swellendam is distant 134 m.

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  • The chief wine-producing districts are those of the Paarl, Worcester, Robertson, Malmesbury, Stellenbosch and the Cape, all in the south-western regions.

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  • via Malmesbury (47 m.), and Piquetberg (107 m.) to Graaf Water (176 m.).

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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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  • At last Pitt was forced to yield to the popular clamour, and in 1796 Lord Malmesbury was sent to France to treat fot peace.

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  • The mutiny at the Nore, the threat of rebellion in Ireland, the alarming fall in consols, argued strongly against continuing the war singlehanded, and in July Lord Malmesbury had been sent to Lille to open fresh negotiations with the plenipotentiaries of France.

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  • A generation of copious chroniclers was, moreover, springing up, and among them were Florence of Worcester, Henry of Huntingdon, Simeon of Durham and William of Malmesbury.

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  • William of Malmesbury, Eadmer and Ordericus Vitalis attain a higher historical standard than had yet been reached in England by any one, with the possible exception of Bede.

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  • There was a great deal too (though little to his blame) in Lord Malmesbury's observation that he was not only disliked in the House of Commons for his mysterious manner, but prejudiced by a pronounced foreign air and aspect.

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  • Lord Malmesbury does not put it quite as strongly as that, but he might have done so with truth.

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  • Smuts, member of the Legislative Assembly for Malmesbury, Cape Colony.

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  • There is also reason for thinking that Wace used the Gesta regum of William of Malmesbury.

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  • c. 675), who had settled in the British stronghold of Bladon or Bladow on the site of the town called Mailduberi, Maldubesburg, Meldunesburg, &c., and finally Malmesbury,' after him.

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  • Ill-health compelled him to leave Canterbury, and he returned to Malmesbury, where he was a monk under Maildulf for fourteen years, dating probably from 661, and including the period of his studies with Hadrian.

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  • When Maildulf died, Aldhelm was appointed in 675, according to a charter of doubtful authenticity cited by William of Malmesbury, by Leutherius, bishop of Dorchester from 671 to 676, to succeed to the direction of the monastery, of which he became the first abbot.

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  • The community at Malmesbury increased, and Aldhelm was able to found two other monasteries to be centres of learning at Frome and at Bradford on Avon.

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  • At Malmesbury he built a new church to replace Maildulf's modest building, and obtained considerable grants of land for the monastery.

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  • This he did in a long and rather acrimonious letter to their king Geraint (Geruntius), and their ultimate agreement with Rome is referred by William of Malmesbury to his efforts.

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  • Sherborne was the new see, of which Aldhelm reluctantly became the first bishop. He wished to resign the abbey of Malmesbury which he had governed for thirty years, but yielding to the remonstrances of the monks he continued to direct it until his death.

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  • The cathedral church which he built at Sherborne, though replaced later by a i For the disputed etymology of Malmesbury, which some connect with Aldhelm's name, see Bishop Browne, St Aldhelm: his Life and Times, p. 73.

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  • Norman church, is described by William of Malmesbury.

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  • The body was taken to Malmesbury, and crosses were set up by the pious care of his friend, Bishop Ecgwine of Worcester, at the various haltingplaces.

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  • of Malmesbury, Gesta Pontificum, p. 361), but was discovered with others of Aldhelm's in the correspondence of St Boniface, archbishop of Mainz.

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  • i I 17), an Italian monk of Malmesbury, afterwards abbot of Abingdon, wrote a Vita S.

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  • 4), printed by Giles and Migne, also in Original Lives of Anglo-Saxons (Caxton Soc., 1854); but the best authority is William of Malmesbury, who in the fifth book, devoted to St Aldhelm, of the Gesta Pontificum proposes to fill up the outline of Faritius, using the church records, the traditions of Aldhelm's miracles preserved by the monks of Malmesbury, and the lost "Handboc" or commonplace book of King Alfred.

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  • The life by John Capgrave in his Legenda Nova (1516) is chiefly an abridgment of Malmesbury's narrative.

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  • Bonhoff, Aldhelm von Malmesbury (Dresden, 1894); T.

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  • Malmesbury Victoria overpowered Easington Sports winning 6-1 with Alan Webb netting a hat trick.

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  • townspeople heard about this new dish and came to the Malmesbury Abbey to try it.

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  • Lord Malmesbury urged the Sardinian government to yield; but Cavour refused to disarm, or to accept the principle of a congress, unless Piedmont were admitted to it on equal terms with the other Powers.

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  • Lord Malmesbury now proposed that all three Powers should disarm simultaneously and that, as suggested by Austria, the precedent of Laibach should be followed and all the Italian states invited to plead their cause at the bar of the Great Powers.

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  • The Lower or Bristol Avon rises on the eastern slope of the Cotteswold Hills in Gloucestershire, collecting the waters of several streams south of Tetbury and east of Malmesbury.

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  • from Malmesbury.

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  • The final rupture seems to have arisen on the question of the declaration of "the armed neutrality of the North;" but we know that Potemkin and the English ambassador, James Harris (afterwards 1st earl of Malmesbury), were both working against him some time before that.

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  • The Fructidorian Directors contemptuously rejected the overtures for peace which Pitt had recently made through the medium of Lord Malmesbury at Lille; and they further illustrated their desire for war and plunder by initiating a forward policy in central Italy and Switzerland which opened up a new cycle of war.

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  • That found in the works of William of Malmesbury (Hardy's ed.

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  • William of Malmesbury, about 1125, already treats Tinchebrai (1r06) as an English victory and the revenge for Hastings.

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  • Rule, Rolls Series, 1884); William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum and Historia novella (ed.

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  • Thus a well-marked depression in the Cotteswolds brings the head of the (Gloucestershire) Coln, one of the head-streams of the Thames, very close to that of the Isborne, a tributary of the upper Avon; the parting between the headstreams of the Thames and the Bristol Avon sinks at one point, near Malmesbury, below 300 ft.; and head-streams of the Great Ouse rise little more than two miles from, and only some 300 ft.

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  • But most notable is the Saxon church of St Lawrence, the foundation of which is generally attributed, according to William of Malmesbury (1125), to St Aldhelm, early in the 8th century.

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  • Thorpe, "Rolls" series, 2 vols., 1861, and also C. Plummer, 2 vols., Oxford, 1892-1899); William of Malmesbury's De gestis regum (ed.

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  • Gerbert's letters contain more than one allusion to organs which he seems to have constructed, and William of Malmesbury has preserved an account of a wonderful musical instrument still to be seen in his days at Reims, which, so far as the English chronicler's words can be made out, seems to refer to an organ worked by steam.

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  • A few years later William of Malmesbury adds a love adventure at Cordova, a compact with the devil, the story of a speaking statue that foretold Gerbert's death at Jerusalem - a prophecy fulfilled, somewhat as in the case of Henry IV.

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  • (3) William of Malmesbury (De gestis pontificum anglorum, ed.

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  • Hamilton, Rolls Series, 1870, p. 406) suggested that he was abbot of Malmesbury and bishop of Crediton.

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  • Among the most notable examples of his work for the Rolls series are the prefaces to Roger of Hoveden, the Gesta regum of William of Malmesbury, the Gesta Henrici II., and the Memorials of St.

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  • JOHN AUBREY (1626-1697), English antiquary, was born at Easton Pierse or Percy, near Malmesbury, Wiltshire, on the 12th of March 1626, his father being a country gentleman of considerable fortune.

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  • He was educated at the Malmesbury grammar school under Robert Latimer, who had numbered Thomas Hobbes among his earlier pupils, and at his schoolmaster's house Aubrey first met the philosopher about whom he was to leave so many curious and interesting details.

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  • Beside the works already mentioned, his papers included: "Architectonica Sacra," notes on ecclesiastical antiquities; and "Life of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury," which served as the basis of Dr Blackburn's Latin life, and also of Wood's account.

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  • Ethelstan died at Gloucester in 940, and was buried at Malmesbury, an abbey which he had munificently endowed during his lifetime.

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  • Primary: The Saxon Chronicle, sub ann.; William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum, i.

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  • Stubbs, Rolls Series); William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum (ed.

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  • Four of the medieval historians from whom he quotes most frequently are Sigebert of Gembloux, Hugh of Fleury, Helinand of Froidmont, and William of Malmesbury, whom he uses for Continental as well as for English history.

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  • There was some talk of inducing d J Y Th f i $ g Glad stone to join the Tory government, and on the 29th of November Lord Malmesbury dubiously remarked, " I cannot make out Gladstone, who seems to me a dark horse."

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  • This famous work, which the author has the audacity to place on the same level with the histories of William of Malmesbury and Henry of Huntingdon, professes to be a translation from a Celtic source; "a very old book in the British tongue" which Walter, archdeacon of Oxford, had brought from Brittany.

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  • The first mention of his name is in a passage of William of Malmesbury, recording the discovery of his tomb in the province of Ros in Wales.

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  • Round, Feudal England; and, for original authorities, the works of Orderic Vitalis and William of Poitiers, and of Florence of Worcester; the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum, and Lanfranc's works, ed.

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  • 823, 894, 9 0 4, 9 1 3, 9 21, 994; William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum, Rolls Series (ed.

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  • William of Malmesbury mentions the existence of a bridge in 994 J.

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  • The life was largely used by subsequent chroniclers, among others by Florence of Worcester, Simeon of Durham, Roger of Hoveden, and William of Malmesbury.

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  • In England it is used by many chroniclers and historians, the best known of whom are William of Malmesbury (d.

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  • le Prevost, Paris, 1845); the first continuation of Symeon's Historia Ecclesiae Dunelmensis (Rolls ed., 1882); William of Malmesbury in the Gesta pontificum (Rolls ed., 1870); and the Peterborough Chronicle (Rolls ed., 1861).

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  • 901), of whom William of Malmesbury writes (Gesta Regum Anglorum, ii.

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  • MALMESBURY, a market town and municipal borough in the Chippenham parliamentary division of Wiltshire, England, 941 m.

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  • Malmesbury has an agricultural trade, with breweries, tanneries and manufactures of silk and pillow lace.

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  • Maildulphus, a Scottish or Irish monk, who came into England about 635, built a hermitage near the site of the modern Malmesbury (Maildulphi-urbs, Maldelmesburh, Malmesbiri) and gathered disciples round him, thus forming the nucleus of the later abbey of which Aldhelm his pupil became the first abbot.

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  • Round the abbey the town of Malmesbury grew up, and by the time of the Domesday Survey it had become one of the only two Wiltshire boroughs.

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  • The castle built at Malmesbury during the reign of Henry I.

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  • It was not incorporated, however, until 1645, when it was made a free borough under the title of "aldermen and burgesses of the borough of Malmesbury, County Wilts."

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  • In the middle ages Malmesbury possessed a considerable cloth manufacture, and at the Dissolution the abbey was bought by a rich clothier and fitted with looms for weaving.

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  • 1 lost of these were translated from William of Malmesbury (t1143?) by Adgar in the 12th century ("Adgar's Marien-Legenden," Altfr.

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  • The earliest church altars were certainly made of wood; and it would appear from a passage in William of Malmesbury (De Gest.

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  • When William of Malmesbury describes the knighting of Athelstan by his grandfather Alfred the Great, that is, his investiture " with a purple garment set with gems and a Saxon sword with a golden sheath," there is no hint of any religious observance.

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  • According to William of Malmesbury the church was founded by St Aldhelm in the 7th century.

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  • THOMAS HOBBES (1588-1679), English philosopher, second son of Thomas Hobbes, was born at Westport (now part of Malmesbury, Wiltshire) on the 5th of April 1588.

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  • His father, vicar of Charlton and Westport, an illiterate and choleric man, quarrelled, it is said, with a brother clergyman at the church door, and was forced to decamp, leaving his three children to the care of an elder brother Francis, a flourishing glover at Malmesbury.

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  • Thomas Hobbes was put to school at Westport church at the age of four, passed to the Malmesbury school at eight, and was taught again in Westport later at a private school kept by a young man named Robert Latimer, fresh from Oxford and " a good Grecian."

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  • Original: William of Malmesbury, De gestis regum; the Gesta Stephani.

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  • He was employed in diplomatic business at the Hague in 1784; and in 1797 he accompanied Lord Malmesbury to Lille as secretary to the embassy.

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  • 4 Of his grandson Athelstan it is related by William of Malmesbury that after the victory of Brunanburgh he imposed upon the vanquished king of Wales a yearly tribute, which included a certain number of "hawks and sharp-scented dogs fit for hunting wild beasts."

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  • William of Malmesbury, again, when relating the crusade of Count Robert of Normandy (1096), transfers into his Gesta regum anglorum (iv.

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  • William of Malmesbury (De gest.

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  • On the other hand, William of Malmesbury prefers to read Heruligena, which would make Scotus a Pannonian, while Bale says he was born at St David's, Dempster connects him with Ayr, and Gale with Eriuven in Hereford.

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  • William of Malmesbury's amusing story illustrates both the character of Scotus and the position he occupied at the French court.

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  • The story that in 882 he was invited to Oxford by Alfred the Great, that he laboured there for many years, became abbot at Malmesbury, and was stabbed to death by his pupils with their "styles," is apparently without any satisfactory foundation, and doubtless refers to some other Johannes.

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  • The story of Scyld is related, with some details not found in Beowulf, by William of Malmesbury, and, less fully, by the loth-century English historian Ethelwerd, though it is told not of Scyld himself, but of his father Sceaf.

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  • The position of Sceldwea and Beaw (in Malmesbury's Latin called Sceldius and Beowius) in the genealogy as anterior to Woden would not of itself prove that they belong to divine mythology and not to heroic legend.

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  • William of Malmesbury gives a letter to Justus of the year 625, in which Canterbury is constituted the metropolitan see of Britain for ever.

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  • and the English Monasteries (1906), and The Last Abbot of Glastonbury (1895 and 1908); William of Malmesbury, "De antiq.

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  • WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY (c. lobo-c. 1143), English historian of the 12th century, was born about the year 1080, in the south country.

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  • He had French as well as English blood in his veins, but he appears to have spent his whole life in England, and the best years of it as a monk at Malmesbury.

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  • The education which he received at Malmesbury included a smattering of logic and physics; but moral philosophy and history, especially the latter, were the subjects to which he devoted most attention.

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  • William also formed an acquaintance with Bishop Roger of Salisbury, who had a castle at Malmesbury.

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  • It may have been due to these friends that he was offered the abbacy of Malmesbury in 1140.

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  • This work, like the Gesta regum, contains five books; the fifth relates the life and miracles of St Aldhelm of Malmesbury, and is based upon the biography by Abbot Faricius; it is less useful than books i.-iv., which are of the greatest value to the ecclesiastical historian.

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  • The historical works of William of Malmesbury were edited by Savile in his Scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596); but the text of that edition is full of errors.

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  • Through the interest of his guardians Lord Malmesbury and Lord Chichester, the duke of Portland made him one of the junior lords of the Admiralty on the formation of his administration in 1807.

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  • It may here be mentioned, as a remarkable instance of his foresight, that Palmerston told Lord Malmesbury, on his accession to the foreign office in 1858, that the chief reason of his opposition to the canal was this: he believed that, if the canal was made and proved successful, Great Britain, as the first mercantile state, and that most closely connected with the East, would be the power most interested in it; that England would therefore be drawn irresistibly into a more direct interference in Egypt, which it was desirable to avoid because England had already enough upon her hands, and because intervention might lead to a rupture with France.

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  • Thorpe (London, 1848-1849); William of Malmesbury, De testis Pontificum Anglorum, edited by N.

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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.

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  • This tradition - which is given only as such by Malmesbury himself - is not confirmed, and there is no mention of it in either Gildas or Bede.

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  • The rocks have been greatly changed by pressure in most cases and by the intrusion of great masses of igneous material, the Namaqualand schists and Malmesbury beds being most altered.

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  • They rest indifferently on the Ibiquas series or Malmesbury beds.

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  • Of the other towns Somerset West (2613), Somerset West Strand (3059), Stellenbosch (4969), Paarl (11,293), Wellington (4881), Ceres (2410), Malmesbury (3811), Caledon (3508), Worcester (7885), Robertson (3244) and Swellendam (2406) are named in the order of proximity to Cape Town, from which Swellendam is distant 134 m.

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  • The chief wine-producing districts are those of the Paarl, Worcester, Robertson, Malmesbury, Stellenbosch and the Cape, all in the south-western regions.

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  • via Malmesbury (47 m.), and Piquetberg (107 m.) to Graaf Water (176 m.).

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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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  • At last Pitt was forced to yield to the popular clamour, and in 1796 Lord Malmesbury was sent to France to treat fot peace.

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  • The mutiny at the Nore, the threat of rebellion in Ireland, the alarming fall in consols, argued strongly against continuing the war singlehanded, and in July Lord Malmesbury had been sent to Lille to open fresh negotiations with the plenipotentiaries of France.

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  • A generation of copious chroniclers was, moreover, springing up, and among them were Florence of Worcester, Henry of Huntingdon, Simeon of Durham and William of Malmesbury.

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  • William of Malmesbury, Eadmer and Ordericus Vitalis attain a higher historical standard than had yet been reached in England by any one, with the possible exception of Bede.

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  • There was a great deal too (though little to his blame) in Lord Malmesbury's observation that he was not only disliked in the House of Commons for his mysterious manner, but prejudiced by a pronounced foreign air and aspect.

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  • Lord Malmesbury does not put it quite as strongly as that, but he might have done so with truth.

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  • Smuts, member of the Legislative Assembly for Malmesbury, Cape Colony.

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  • There is also reason for thinking that Wace used the Gesta regum of William of Malmesbury.

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  • c. 675), who had settled in the British stronghold of Bladon or Bladow on the site of the town called Mailduberi, Maldubesburg, Meldunesburg, &c., and finally Malmesbury,' after him.

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  • Ill-health compelled him to leave Canterbury, and he returned to Malmesbury, where he was a monk under Maildulf for fourteen years, dating probably from 661, and including the period of his studies with Hadrian.

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  • When Maildulf died, Aldhelm was appointed in 675, according to a charter of doubtful authenticity cited by William of Malmesbury, by Leutherius, bishop of Dorchester from 671 to 676, to succeed to the direction of the monastery, of which he became the first abbot.

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  • The community at Malmesbury increased, and Aldhelm was able to found two other monasteries to be centres of learning at Frome and at Bradford on Avon.

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  • At Malmesbury he built a new church to replace Maildulf's modest building, and obtained considerable grants of land for the monastery.

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  • This he did in a long and rather acrimonious letter to their king Geraint (Geruntius), and their ultimate agreement with Rome is referred by William of Malmesbury to his efforts.

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  • Sherborne was the new see, of which Aldhelm reluctantly became the first bishop. He wished to resign the abbey of Malmesbury which he had governed for thirty years, but yielding to the remonstrances of the monks he continued to direct it until his death.

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  • The cathedral church which he built at Sherborne, though replaced later by a i For the disputed etymology of Malmesbury, which some connect with Aldhelm's name, see Bishop Browne, St Aldhelm: his Life and Times, p. 73.

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  • Norman church, is described by William of Malmesbury.

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  • The body was taken to Malmesbury, and crosses were set up by the pious care of his friend, Bishop Ecgwine of Worcester, at the various haltingplaces.

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  • of Malmesbury, Gesta Pontificum, p. 361), but was discovered with others of Aldhelm's in the correspondence of St Boniface, archbishop of Mainz.

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  • i I 17), an Italian monk of Malmesbury, afterwards abbot of Abingdon, wrote a Vita S.

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  • 4), printed by Giles and Migne, also in Original Lives of Anglo-Saxons (Caxton Soc., 1854); but the best authority is William of Malmesbury, who in the fifth book, devoted to St Aldhelm, of the Gesta Pontificum proposes to fill up the outline of Faritius, using the church records, the traditions of Aldhelm's miracles preserved by the monks of Malmesbury, and the lost "Handboc" or commonplace book of King Alfred.

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  • The life by John Capgrave in his Legenda Nova (1516) is chiefly an abridgment of Malmesbury's narrative.

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  • Bonhoff, Aldhelm von Malmesbury (Dresden, 1894); T.

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  • Malmesbury has always been the focus of its surrounding district.

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  • The townspeople heard about this new dish and came to the Malmesbury Abbey to try it.

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