Mabillon sentence example

mabillon
  • 3 It is found, e.g., in the second of Mone's masses from the Reichenau palimpsest, and in Mabillon's Missale Gothicum, No.
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  • Another Itinerary, preserved at Einsiedeln, printed by Mabillon, dates from the latter half of the same century.
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  • Mabillon, Annales ordinis sancti Benedicti, lib.
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  • Paldo, Tuto and Vaso (according to Mabillon); Assumption of the Virgin; Combat between the Virtues and the Vices.
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  • See Mabillon, Acta sanct.
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  • The chief general authority for Benedictine history up to the middle of the 12th century is Mabillon's Annales, in 6 vols.
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  • So far as Spain is concerned there is evidence for it in the decrees of the 4th council of Toledo (633),(633), and for Rome that of the 8th century Ordo of Mabillon.
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  • In the 17th century the erudition of France is best represented by "Henricus Valesius," Du Cange and Mabillon.
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  • The Liber comitis formerly attributed to St Jerome must be three, or nearly three, centuries later than that saint, and the Luxeuil lectionary, or Lectionarium Gallicanum, which Mabillon attributed to the 7th, cannot be earlier than the 8th century; yet the oldest MSS.
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  • Mabillon and his Benedictines of SaintMaur paved the way for the systematic investigation of historical records.
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  • The Palaeographia graeca (1708), illustrating the whole history of Greek writing and the variations of the characters, has not yet been superseded; in its own field it is as original as the De re diplomatica of Mabillon.
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  • Benedicti (Paris, 1668-1701) of d'Achery and Mabillon, does not entirely escape this reproach.
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  • But when Luc d'Achery turned from exegetics to patristics and the lives of the saints, as a sort of Christian humanist, he led the way to that vast work of collection and comparison of texts which developed through Mabillon, Montfaucon, Ruinart, Martene, Bouquet and their associates, into the indispensable implements of modern historians.
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  • Jean Mabillon's treatise, De re diplomatica (1 681), was due to the criticisms of that group of Belgian Jesuits whose Acta Sanctorum quotquot toto orbe coluntur (1643, &c., see Bollandists) was destined to grow into the greatest repository of legend and biography the world has seen.
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  • Papebroch's criticisms of the chronicle of St Denis, Mabillon prepared this manual for the testing of medieval documents.
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  • The machinery of research, invented by the genius of men like Mabillon, was perfected and set going in all the archives of Europe.
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  • Tilpin was elected archbishop between 752 and 768, probably in 753; he died, if the evidence of a diploma alluded to by Mabillon may be trusted, in 794, although it has been stated that this event took place on the 2nd of September 800.
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  • The best known episode of his subsequent life was the "Contestation" with Mabillon on the lawfulness of monks devoting themselves to study, which De Rance denied.
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  • In Mabillon's Prefaces (reprinted separately) these lives were for the first time made to illustrate the ecclesiastical and civil history of the early middle ages.
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  • Mabillon's masterpiece was the De re diplomatica (1681; and supplement, 1704) in which were first laid down the principles for determining.
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  • Mabillon produced in all some twenty folio volumes and as many of lesser size, nearly all works of monumental erudition (the chief are named in the article Maurists).
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  • In 1819, after being temporarily deposited in a stone sarcophagus in the court of the Louvre during the Revolutionary epoch, they were transferred to St Germain-des-Pres, where they now repose between Montfaucon and Mabillon.
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  • In the course of the 8th and 9th centuries, by the operation 1 Of this proceeding an elaborate account exists in the very interesting document printed by Mabillon in his Museum Italicum as" Ordo Romanus I.; the small phials of wine which were brought were emptied into a large bowl, and the loaves of bread were collected in a bag.
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  • Mabillon never allowed his studies to interfere with his life as a monk; he was noted for his regular attendance at the choral recitation of the office and the other duties of the monastic life, and for his deep personal religion, as well as for a special charm of character.
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