Lifehistory sentence example

lifehistory
  • It is worse than useless to apply drastic remedies if the main facts cf the, lifehistory of the pest are not known; e.g.
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  • Swammerdam's Biblia naturae, issued in 1737, fifty years after its author's death, and containing observations on the structure and lifehistory of a series of insect types.
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  • The above sketch may be regarded as descriptive of the lifehistory of a great majority of species of caddis-flies.
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  • So in some respects is the lifehistory, with a true larval preparatory stage, unlike the parent form, and living an aquatic life, breathing dissolved air by means of a paired series of abdominal tracheal gills.
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  • They resemble the May-flies in their " hemimetabolous " lifehistory; the young insects are markedly unlike their parents, inhabiting fresh water and breathing dissolved air, either through tracheal gills at the tip of the abdomen, or by a branching system of air-tubes on the walls of the rectum into which water is periodically admitted.
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  • It is to be noted that all the forms exhibit the fusion of nuclei in the ascus, so that those with the normal or reduced sexual process described above have two nuclear fusions in their lifehistory.
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  • This is the lifehistory of the most complicated forms, of the so-called eu forms. In the opsis forms the uredospores are absent, the mycelium from the aecidiospores producing directly the teleutospores.
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  • (All after Migula.) certain number of forms may show different types of cell during the various phases of the life-history,' yet the majority of forms are uniform, showing one type of cell throughout their lifehistory.
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  • The question of species in the bacteria is essentially the same as in other groups of plants; before a form can be placed in a satisfactory classificatory position its whole lifehistory must be studied, so that all the phases may be known.
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  • The higher "warm-blooded" creatures appear to present the simplest case and in their lifehistory there seems to be a point at which we can say "that which was alive is now dead."
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  • Space will only permit of a brief general account of the more obvious features of the several genera, the structure and lifehistory of which are known in great detail.
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  • Although the antithetic theory is supported by many facts regarding the lifehistory and structure of the group of plants under consideration, it is quite possible that a stage in which the sporophyte was wholly dependent on the gametophyte may never have been passed through in their evolution.
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  • Brown writes: "If for the theory ` life without air ' is substituted the consideration that yeast cells can use oxygen in the manner of ordinary aerobic fungi, and probably do require it for the full completion of their lifehistory, but that the exhibition of their fermentative functions is independent of their environment with regard to free oxygen, it will be found that there is nothing contradictory in Pasteur's experiments to such a hypothesis."
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